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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    3,210

    Get a Skylight UV filter

    I already posted this in another Forum - but thought I should share this here too: -
    OK - here's a seasoned photographer who's casually dabbled for more years than he'd like to admit to.
    However - no one is immune to overlooking basics sometimes!.
    After I got my initial dSLR settup just over a year ago - I found a minute mark on my Sigma 17 - 70
    lens.
    Horrified I remembered I hadn't purchased a protective UV filter.
    Fortunately there is no visible effect and the mark is tiny.
    So both the 17 - 70 & the 70 - 300 were duly fitted with UV filters.
    I always used UV filters or skylight filters on my lenses in my fSLR days - so why did I forget?...
    Now - I just purchased an inbetween lens which could turn out to be used more than I thought it would be
    the 28 - 200, which I found has been discontinued - I got the Sigma so at least I have a matching set (not that it really matters).
    Taking some comparison shots at the same focal lenths I noticed outside that the 28 - 200 had a slightly, almost soft, haze to the fine detail - I figured it was just not quite as sharp as the 17 - 70 (which it probably isn't). Then it dawned on my tiny old brain cell - I haven't got a UV filter on it!!!!
    How stupid can I be and still be alive??
    My advice?
    Buy a filter to protect your lens - make it a good one - not a cheapo one - they are more likely to cause reflections off the digital sensor. I am very pleased with the Sigma DG one I got (to match the lens) other makes, like Hoya, for example are good too.
    BTW - shop around - prices for the same thing vary quite a lot!!
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Geoff Chandler; 02-27-2008 at 09:26 AM.
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    I noticed in my 35mm days that a good SMC UV filter would sharpen a picture somewhat.

    I echo what Geoff says - use a good one. I used to use Hoya. Lots of people sniffed at Hoya saying B&W was better. Quite honestly I don't think it really matters as long as the filter isn't a cheapie (store brand or off brand).

    As an example of a bad filter, I bought a Jessops uncoated 1A filter and that worked better as a light diffuser than as anything else.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    3,210
    Spot on Rhys!
    Whilst trying to find a good price - I casually glanced at a cheap Jessops one - and thought [I]'Nahh!'[/] - Don't misunderstand - Jessops are great at times.
    One reputable site had my Sigma DG at 34.99 - there are some much more expensive prices around - Some Nikon filters at as much as 50= - then I stumbled on one site selling my DG (72mm) at 99=...can't top that yet. The 34.99 one was OK and with 4.99 P&P there's not much change from 40=...So you can see why I was Tempted by some cheaper ones at 15= to 25= !! However, spending a little more time I found Bristol Cameras did my Sigma UV DG 72mm for: -
    "Sub-Total: 23.00
    Regions (Shipping to Surrey, United Kingdom ): 2.50
    Total: 25.50"

    again - I can't emphasise enough - shop around, the first site is often a good one - but not everything is cheapest at one place.
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Mattoon, IL USA
    Posts
    143
    But what about the claim that some make: adding a UV filter softens the focus of your lens? I too, always keep some type of filter on my lenses. But I do wonder if there is any truth the the claim that some make. Anyone have any thoughts on this?

    Have a good day.
    Respectfully,

    Mike Sneddon
    Mattoon, IL USA

    Canon SD1000, S3, 20D & 5D; Panasonic LX2. Canon lenses: 50mm f1.4, 16-35mm f2.8, 28-70mm f2.8 and 70-200mm f2.8 IS Also have two film cameras: Canon Elan 7E and a Yashica TL Super (which I purchased in Vietnam in 1969 for $106).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by mjsneddon View Post
    But what about the claim that some make: adding a UV filter softens the focus of your lens? I too, always keep some type of filter on my lenses. But I do wonder if there is any truth the the claim that some make. Anyone have any thoughts on this?

    Have a good day.
    Low quality filter act as diffusers. Sad but true!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    3,210
    Use a low quality filter and you will see a degradation of photo quality.
    Use a high quality filter and you will struggle to see any degradation - and sometimes you may even find a bit of an improvement - like when it filters out a little haze to reveal some fine detail.
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    There have been several threads on this already. You'll hear arguments for both sides. Personally I don't believe in them. I'll just stick to my lens hoods.
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Wild, Wonderful, Wyoming
    Posts
    1,043
    Yep, a lot of posts on this subject, you are not going to change anyone's mind on this. Naked here, my hood does fine protecting my lenses.
    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    Ansel Adams

    Rule books are paper, they will not cushion a sudden meeting of stone and metal.
    Ernest K. Gann-Fate is the Hunter.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    So Calif
    Posts
    3,226
    Hopefully this will stick a fork in it - again.

    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27381
    Pentax K20D/K5/15/21/40/70/10-17/12-24, Sigma 17-70 2.8-4.5/150-500, Tamron 90 Macro/70-200 2.8, Canon SX20 IS/Elph 500HS
    (formerly Pentax 50 1.4/50-200/55-300/K100D, Sigma 18-50 2.8/70-300 APO, Tamron 28-75, Viv 800, Tele-Tokina 800, Canon S3 IS, Samsung L210)
    http://s133.photobucket.com/albums/q78/KylePix/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Surrey, England
    Posts
    3,210
    Quote Originally Posted by SpecialK View Post
    Hopefully this will stick a fork in it - again.

    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27381
    Ha Ha - I see this is a real jar of worms here, but I am still sticking to my opinion - but respect those who feel different. The lens hood, for me, doesn't cut it - it's for a different purpose - besides - if I use fill in flash and a bit of zoom - the lens hood casts a shadow.
    I have used UV or Skylight filters for years and never had anything negative to report from using them - only posative
    Nuff said
    Geoff Chandler. UK/England/Surrey
    NIKON D90 / D80. Nikon 16 - 85 VR, Tamron 28-200,
    Sigma 70-300APO, Tokina 100 AT-X Pro D.
    SB600 flash. Panasonic DMC-TZ25

    http://geof777.multiply.com

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