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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Talking B & W Imaging

    Quote Originally Posted by scott630 View Post
    how would this pic look in B&W?
    It would probably look a lot like this:

    Name:  Montana-B&W.jpg
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Size:  37.6 KB Name:  Montana1.jpg
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    But don't take my word for it. LOL
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-10-2008 at 12:39 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Goodyear,AZ
    Posts
    15
    is it just me or does the B&W draw you towards her eyes. Thanks for the B&W. sould I upgrade the software? or stick with the sony?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Photoshop CS3 offers more ...

    For better control of B&W toning from color ... you are probably going to need to go to Photoshop CS3. It has a special adjustment layer that allows for more control over B&W shots ... here's a sample of the difference


    The first image is a desaturated color image ... the second with the new CS3 B&W filtering by color:

    DESATURATED . . . . . . . . . B&W tone control
    Name:  Montana-desat.jpg
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Size:  59.5 KB Name:  Montana-B&W.jpg
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    In the above: You can see, by reducing the green tones of the grass and varying the yellow and cyan .. we get a contrast shift ... and she stands out against the background better. Adjusting red ... her paw picks loses some contrast and looks more defined in the lighter areas. It's subtle, but makes for a more "balanced" exposure appearance.

    THE CONTROL PANEL

    Name:  B&W tone control.JPG
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    ABOVE: You have sliders available to control the six colors (RED, GREEN, BLUE, YELLOW, CYAN & MAGENTA) involved in the shot, where with standard desaturation ... it drains all the colors equally, with no selective control.

    BELOW: COLOR SLIDERS AFTER B&W TONAL ADJUSTMENT
    Name:  B&W after adjust.JPG
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Size:  48.0 KB
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-10-2008 at 08:57 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Goodyear,AZ
    Posts
    15
    you can definitely see in the second photo she pops out. Guess I know
    where my tax money going.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Every photographer needs a "darkroom"

    Basically ... it is using the tools to refine your work. It is a rare thing, indeed, to get it all in one shot or without at least some "dark room" touch-up. You ask much.

    My feeling is to try and get the "best shot" you can, with what you have ... then work it up a bit in Photoshop to:
    • clean out defects (color cast corrections, barrel distortions, etc)
    • item interference (stuff that shouldn't be in the image)
    • cropping (extra image that serves no "story-telling" purpose)
    • exposure adjustments (to enhance and refine the light used to describe the subject)


    Practice is necessary. You need to inspect and manipulate to an extreme ... use the sliders all the way ... to see what they can do to and for the image ... then back them down to what you want to see. Then do it one more time ... to be sure you have gotten your balanced look.

    Anyway ... investing in good software for your camera is essential to producing improved work, digitally. It is your digital "darkroom" ... where the miracles happen. LOL Good luck!
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-10-2008 at 11:23 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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