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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    2,889

    Red and Blues...


    EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, 18.0 mm, 30Sec, f5.0, ISO 100


    EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, 18.0 mm, 33Sec, f3.5, ISO 100


    EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, 18.0 mm, 60Sec, f3.5, ISO 100

    What have I done wrong on all the above pics to give me this redness....is it because of the long shutter speed..??


    EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, 18.0 mm, 30Sec, f5.0, ISO 100

    And here...why are the stars blue???
    Film
    Nikon EM, Series E lenses 50mm f1.8|28mm f1.8|100mm f2.8, Sigma 80-200mm f4.5-5.6
    Minolta Riva 100AF, Sinpo PQ-3, Olympus mju-III wide 100, Yashica 635
    Digital
    Sony cybershot W90, cybershot T90
    Canon A720i|400D|7D|5DMKII|85mm f1.8|24-105mm f4|135mm f2|40mm f2.8|430EX II*2|BG-E3|BG-E7
    Sigma 24mm f1.8|50mm f2.8|105mm f2.8 Samyang 8mm fisheye
    Portfolio

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,129
    Pick up a gray card and set your white balance manually. Or shoot raw and change it after the fact.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    180
    The redness comes from the white balance. Lights shine differently depending on the temperature of the light they produce. Often with night shots the auto white balance functions of your camera won't balance well for the lights. You could either select a specific white balance mode, such as tungsten. Or, you could adjust the white balance in post processing.

    With the stars, they look pretty white to me. Though, stars to tend to pick up a little color dew to the light passing through our atmosphere.

    50D, Rebel XT, 70-200mm F4L IS, 17-85mm IS, 50mm F1.8, 28-135mm IS, 18-55mm, 75-300mm, 580 EX II, 480 EX II, Opus speedlight umbrella kit.
    Aron de Haan: Photography

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dubai, UAE
    Posts
    2,889
    so its all to do with my White balance and not the shutter speed..hmm...good that I shot these in RAW....thanks

    @griptape....a grey card...so can it be any grey colored thing like a grey cardboard??

    @Zoniac....The stars that are not soo bright are the ones that look blueish...
    Film
    Nikon EM, Series E lenses 50mm f1.8|28mm f1.8|100mm f2.8, Sigma 80-200mm f4.5-5.6
    Minolta Riva 100AF, Sinpo PQ-3, Olympus mju-III wide 100, Yashica 635
    Digital
    Sony cybershot W90, cybershot T90
    Canon A720i|400D|7D|5DMKII|85mm f1.8|24-105mm f4|135mm f2|40mm f2.8|430EX II*2|BG-E3|BG-E7
    Sigma 24mm f1.8|50mm f2.8|105mm f2.8 Samyang 8mm fisheye
    Portfolio

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Amherst, MA
    Posts
    3,249
    Quote Originally Posted by faisal View Post
    ... good that I shot these in RAW....
    That's why I shoot mostly in RAW; so easy to adjust WB.
    Michael B.
    Canon 5D2, 550D, Sony NEX 5N, Sigma 15mm fish, 24L mkI, 35L, 40mm f/2.8, 50 1.8 II, Sigma 50 1.4, Sigma 50mm f/2.8 macro, 60mm macro, 100mm f/2, 70-200 f/4, 200 f/2.8 mk I, Tamron 28-75 f/2.8, 430EX. Growing list of MF lenses!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    It actually may be the use of the long shutter speeds. It looks to me as if there is a little more going on than just white balance off. Back in the film days there was a thing called color reciprocity failure where you would get color shifts in exposures generally longer than 1 second. I'm not sure if this still applies to the digital realm or not. Maybe someone else will know.
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest (US)
    Posts
    128
    Quote Originally Posted by D Thompson View Post
    It actually may be the use of the long shutter speeds. It looks to me as if there is a little more going on than just white balance off. Back in the film days there was a thing called color reciprocity failure where you would get color shifts in exposures generally longer than 1 second. I'm not sure if this still applies to the digital realm or not. Maybe someone else will know.
    I thought reciprocity failure was not an issue with digital sensors, but I could be wrong.
    Digital:
    Canon PowerShot A570 IS

    Nikon D5000

    Film:
    Fujica ST605n
    Olympus XA


    Cameras from my past:
    Fujifilm S6000fd; Canon PowerShot S50; Canon PowerShot A40; Nikon N8008s; Pentax Spotmatic F; Fujica ST605; Canon Canonet GIII QL19

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    Quote Originally Posted by seo View Post
    I thought reciprocity failure was not an issue with digital sensors, but I could be wrong.
    I don't know, just thought I'd throw it out there. Hopefully someone smarter will know.
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    180
    I'm pretty sure that it's a chemical thing that causes the failure. I was taught aswell that digital doesn't suffer from that. I do get pixels that will go solid one color on long exposures.. if it's a star shot I just count them as red or blue stars. :-p

    50D, Rebel XT, 70-200mm F4L IS, 17-85mm IS, 50mm F1.8, 28-135mm IS, 18-55mm, 75-300mm, 580 EX II, 480 EX II, Opus speedlight umbrella kit.
    Aron de Haan: Photography

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lex-vegas
    Posts
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by faisal View Post
    @griptape....a grey card...so can it be any grey colored thing like a grey cardboard??
    no, not any ole grey card....google grey card and there are samples you can download and instructions...

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