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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Sydney, Australia
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    4,428
    Yes Chris8105. Indoors shots are considered low light; don't worry - no one misunderstood you here.

    The link provided by KCook also mentions Fuji F30. Unfortunately, Fuji discontinued it and replaced with the disappointing F50fd. For normal use 6MP should be sufficient unless you print life size posters and the F50fd suffers because of this MP race and boosts F50 to 12MP.

    Your budget will get you a good camera but like all cameras, they suffer in lower light; especially PnS cameras. F40fd still perform better than the rest, in my opinion.
    Last edited by tim11; 01-22-2008 at 02:39 AM.
    Nikon D90, D80
    Nikkor 16-85mm AF-S DX F/3.5-5.6G ED VR, Tamron SP AF 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) macro, Nikkor 50mm F/1.4D, Nikkor 50mm F/1.8D, Nikkor AF-S VR 70-300mm F/4.5-5.6G IF-ED, Sigma 105mm F/2.8 EX DG Macro ||| 2x SB800 | SB600 ||| Manfrotto 190XB

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    western US
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    1,218

    Cool

    The question of "low light" is useful, I think. Often discussions about the best low light cameras are at the extreme. Where the light is so low that everybody is banging away at ISO 800 or higher.

    However, in the real world there can be lots of indoor situations where the light level is not all that low. You can shoot at ISO 400, or even ISO 200. Especially if the subject is a still life and you're using a tripod or have the benefit of effective IS. As for example a product shoot for an e-bay listing.

    I will fearlessly submit that at ISO 200 there are a great many cameras that can match the IQ of the low light stars like the Fuji jobs. Ditto ISO 400, though that would shrink the population some.

    So, yeah, good question about just what low light means.

    Kelly

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    10
    Once again, thanks for the info. Even with a 300 dollar budget, you still recomend that I get the F40?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    Quote Originally Posted by chris8105 View Post
    Once again, thanks for the info. Even with a 300 dollar budget, you still recomend that I get the F40?
    If low light no flash shooting is very important to you, there simply isn't a better camera in that range.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    10
    Low light isnt as important as I made it out to sound in my first post. What I am looking for is the best all around camera I can get for 250-300 dollars. Mainly being used for taking pictures on vacations and family get togethers.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South West Florida
    Posts
    52
    You still won't be disappointed. The F40fd is a good all around pocket cam in regards to image quality. It's metering does well low light and outdoors daylight, unlike my F30, which I'm always adjusting EV- outdoors to not blow highlights.
    Steve
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Fujifilm Finepix F30
    Olympus E-510
    14-42 f3.5-5.6, 40-150 f4-5.6, Sigma 135-400 f4.5-5.6 APO DG

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,173
    If you want to use manual controls (the F40 is a pure P&S) then I'd look at the Canon A720. It'll give you IS, more zoom, and full manual controls.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
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    4,428
    Quote Originally Posted by KCook View Post
    The question of "low light" is useful, I think. Often discussions about the best low light cameras are at the extreme. Where the light is so low that everybody is banging away at ISO 800 or higher.

    However, in the real world there can be lots of indoor situations where the light level is not all that low. You can shoot at ISO 400, or even ISO 200. Especially if the subject is a still life and you're using a tripod or have the benefit of effective IS. As for example a product shoot for an e-bay listing.

    ---
    I have to disagree on that point. For still objects- Yes you maybe able to hold the camera still or use a tripod. However for moving subjects, it doesn't take much to raise ISO to 800 or above. For indoors, ISO400 can be used only during a bright day when there is plenty of light coming in through the windows; otherwise it's has to be 800. Indoors at night, anything less than 800 isn't possible and the house has to be brightly lit for that. I'm talking about (2x) 100W light bulbs if you are to use ISO800. I often use ISO1600 to take pictures of the kids. If you don't want to use the flash; of course.

    chris8105, like David said, if no flash is important then nothing beat F40fd in that price range. However, if low light no flash isn't that important then there are so many to choose from. One of my favourites is A720 IS. Its image quality at higher ISO is not as good as F40fd but you can use manual controls and tripod to take low light still objects and limit the ISO level.
    Nikon D90, D80
    Nikkor 16-85mm AF-S DX F/3.5-5.6G ED VR, Tamron SP AF 28-75mm F/2.8 XR Di LD Aspherical (IF) macro, Nikkor 50mm F/1.4D, Nikkor 50mm F/1.8D, Nikkor AF-S VR 70-300mm F/4.5-5.6G IF-ED, Sigma 105mm F/2.8 EX DG Macro ||| 2x SB800 | SB600 ||| Manfrotto 190XB

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    western US
    Posts
    1,218

    Smile

    Oh, I agree completely that either flash or high ISO settings are needed for action photography indoors. But what the post starting this thread said was -
    I occasionaly sell items on ebay, so good up close pictures under artificial light is a must.
    Which I take to be a still life situation?

    Kelly

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    10
    I cant take much more of this, I am about to pull my hair out. I never knew buying a camera could be so stressfull. I was just about ready to pull the trigger on the F40 but I want to go with a camera with manual controls. I would prefer a camera that uses a lithium ion battery pack, but if I have to go with AA batteries then so be it.

    Every camera I am about ready to buy I check the user reviews and find some people complaining about it. I know that you cant please everyone and there will always be someone complaining. For example I was looking at the Panasonic Lumix DMC TZ3 and found that alot of people was having problem with the flash not working correctly and the camera only taking good pictures outside. For all I know this guy doesnt know how to operate the camera. I just dont want to buy a camera and not be happy with it. Buying a new car isnt this stressful.

    I just want a camera with manual controls, takes good pictures indoors and outdoors, $250-$300 range, and preferably lithium ion battery pack. And using the flash for indoor shots are no problem. Sorry if I am being a pain I just want to be happy with what I buy.

    Thanks
    Last edited by chris8105; 01-23-2008 at 02:04 AM.

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