Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554
    Frank ... I think that because you are shooting square to the side of the building, it accentuates the flatness to the image. Try moving to a position that allows the rear wall and left rear corner to show up, also. More of the three-dimensional approach and one that makes the cabin look like it is looking out across the lake. It would leave the viewer wondering, "Hey, what's out there? What did the owner see when you open the door?" Kind of a "stroy-telling" shot.

    The sky is also rather lackluster ... and so bright, it tends to dominate the shot. That is where you might get some improvement with placing a circular polarizer on your lens. This adjustable filter tends to sharpen the image by only allowing direct light into the camera and rejects glare and reflections, because they are coming in at different angles. The blue sky becomes more defined ... as cloud glare is reduced. When you are doing outdoor-type shots, during the day, a CP can really make quite a difference and is hard to duplicate in software post processing (Photoshop) without a lot of work cutting, masking and pasting.

    You could also try waiting until the sun it setting ... and create drama with shadows and a more colorful sky. With the sky being so huge and plain ... it's just not helping. It's what they term, "negative space" ... and that usally means composition work.

    Because this image is rather ... gray, for lack of a better term, you might accentuate that with the idea of rendering it in black & white. Just for grins, slip the desaturation slider all the way to the left and see if that renders a more ... compelling image. I guess the idea goes that is the color is not necessary for improving the image ... why not delete it?

    Cabin - Desaturated

    Name:  Cabin-desat.jpg
Views: 96
Size:  226.7 KB

    See how that bright sky doesn't seem to matter as much, in the B&W version? It just seems more effective ... and tolerable.

    As far as the α100 is concerned ... you could try reviewing the histogram for each shot, making sure you get a balanced spectrum for it. That bright sky has to be heavily weighted in this image. I'm doing this from work ... so I have no real way of reviewing it, at this time. Still, a slightly different angle ... implying and suggesting interest in something other than just the wall. Although, the B&W does make it look more interesting. The texture is apparently more pronounced.

    This one just lacks that 3-D aspect ... to give the structure ... definition. I just looks flat ... perhaps just a hint of the rear wall ... like the first one had with the front wall.

    Cabin - desaturated with a hint of tint

    Name:  Cabin-scene-toned.jpg
Views: 97
Size:  230.6 KB

    Another aspect that will help enormously is when you submit an image for critique is to also supply the standard EXIF data (camera, lens, focal length, aperture, shutter-speed, ISO, lighting, special functions used and any other useful information) for each shot. It can be pulled off the image, usually, but having it right up front helps out. That imformation simply allows the person offering an opinion a better understanding of how the image was taken. It's not the be all, end all ... but, offers a solid baseline to work from and easily read from the image's properties on the computer.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-09-2008 at 08:26 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Don

    Thanks for all the time and effort you put into my picture. I will try some of the things you mentioned and repost. Is there any books that i can read on how to compose my shots better. This site has been a great help. It makes me enjoy taking pictures all the more.

    Rooz you have been a great help also.
    Thanks again Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554
    Composition has some rudementary rules, like:

    • Am I chopping off someone's head? Not a good practice ... recompose.
    • Can I put some distance between my real subject and the "background elements" (Doing this with DOF-aperture techniques, zooming in or out, trying a different angle, something to keep from using Photoshop as your touch-up solution)?
    • Uniform flow in the image ... grouping by size or height. Example: There is nothing worse than having a "gravity-challenged" individual standing next to a light and aery model-formed cutie, in a big group. This takes work ... but it WILL be appreciated, later, when viewed.
    • Overall lighting ... balanced for shadows and highlights. (We're not talking "mood-lighting")
    • Depict some depth to three dimensional objects. Pick a good corner to concentrate on and work around it, unless you are trying to show a specific subject not related to the "background."
    • Look at the surroundings before you concentrate completely on the subject. Ask yourself .... "What's in my viewfinder?" and then look to see what it is. If it cannot be moved, stretch your shot-framing out a bit to have enough of something to paste over it later, in Photoshop, to make your image more ... appealing. By having this extra image (which you can easily crop away) ... you maintain shadows, lighting and observational angle without much work in post-processing.


    Off the cuff, these are just some of the foundational compositional elements I use in my own photography ... and probably what I have seen in many others. I've also made my share of mistakes, as have others. We all learn ... and we all should keep learning.

    Someone else may suggest some reading material ... I haven't really anything outside of school, on this. Composition is relationship you have to have a feel for, when it comes to art. There are some rules, but talent is measured in appeal ... not always following the rules.

    Good luck and keep taking images, getting constructive critiques, and measure yourself to get your feel.

    As my ART 105 instructor offered:

    "How do you get better at Art? Look at it ... and do it."
    Last edited by DonSchap; 01-14-2008 at 11:05 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,562
    Don
    Thanks once again I am going to cut and past that somewhere where I can read it over and over. I now don't leave home without my camera. So I will be taking alot of pictures. I hope the site has enough band width to handle them. LOL Just kidding.
    Thanks
    Frank
    Sony A77
    Sony A580
    Sony A 100
    Maxxum 400si.
    Sony 18-70 Kit Lens
    Minolta AF 35-70
    Minolta AF 50 f/1.7
    Tamron 70-300 f/4-5.6 Di LD
    Tamron 60mm Macro
    Tamron 17-50 f/2.8
    Tamron 2x Converter
    Sony HVL-F42AM
    Quantaray 70-300 4.5-5.6 Macro
    Slingshot 200 Bag



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/22083244@N06/

    http://s305.photobucket.com/albums/nn219/sparkie1263/

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    God's Country - Australia
    Posts
    10,421
    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie1263 View Post
    Don

    Thanks for all the time and effort you put into my picture. I will try some of the things you mentioned and repost. Is there any books that i can read on how to compose my shots better. This site has been a great help. It makes me enjoy taking pictures all the more.

    Rooz you have been a great help also.
    Thanks again Frank
    Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is a great book. as for composition, the best way is to look at heaps of photos on flickr and when you see photos you like...think about how the person composed the shot. it just comes with time and its also quite personal. what one person considers great composition, others consider not so great.
    D800e l V3 l AW1 l 16-35 l 35 l 50 l 85 l 105 l EM1 l 7.5 l 12-40 l 14 l 17 l 25 l 45 l 60 l 75
    flickr

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sverige
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    nicer composition, how about a landscape crop ?

    upped the levels and curves and some unsharp mask. you need to work on your camera settings. the pics are way too soft and flat. maybe Don can help you get the most out of your in cam settings.
    I like that composition too, but I would only make the original picture slightly brigther. Your revision looks good too, but after having seen the original yours in comparison looks a bit 'harsh' (contrast?) and a tad too color saturated. The original looks more real, or something.

    Just an opinion, of course. I know I like color saturation less than most people.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •