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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Thumbs up α700 & SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di-II LD

    Okay ... so yeah, I liked the lens so much, after I sold my Canon version, I purchased a replacement one for my SONY α700.

    One of the first things that I noticed was that there is a difference in focal length at the long end. The TAMRON really doesn't quite make it to 50mm. It get's to about 45-47mm. The wide-end I will still have to test, but it looks pretty close to 17mm.

    Still, it is one of the sharpest zoom lenses you can mount on a SONY. It delivers a superior shot and should probably be the zoom lens you select for indoor shots, more than anything else.

    A lot has been said about the TAMRON SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di-II LD Aspherical, most of it good. My personal experiences with the lens on my old Canon EOS 20D were nothing but positive, other than its lack of IS. Well, the SONY solves that issue, obviously, with in-the-body-IS.

    Name:  A700+17-50f28.jpg
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    By having the range of 17 to uh ... 47mm, it is effectively seeing the same thing you'd get using a 26.5-70.5mm lens on a 35mm-film camera. But, to be honest, this DCF conversion idea is wearing a little thin, because (insert drumroll) ... you can only mount this lens on a APS-C sensor camera. In other words ... their is no 35mm-film or full frame sensor capability with it, so why bother? You get framed what you get framed.

    In fact ... this particular mount ONLY fits on the α100 or α700 camera. You cannot use it on a Minolta film camera ... and I'm not completely sure about the Minolta 5D or 7D. Perhaps another user can fill in that informational opportunity.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 11-09-2007 at 06:25 AM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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