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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    SW Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    26

    Overexposed? Critique please!

    Hey everyone, other than my shots being blury or fuzzy, does anyone notice if they are overexposed? These were all shot with my XSI and the 55-250mm lens i just bought, I mostly used the fully automatic shooting mode.





    couple pic
    Canon xsi
    F/4
    1/100 sec
    ISO 100
    55mm focal length



    duck photo:
    Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XSi
    F/7.1
    1/200 sec exposure
    ISO 200
    135mm length



    please let me know what you think, if i should adjust settings (if possible) or what things i should change

    thanks

    -Aaron

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL USA
    Posts
    935
    They are maybe 1/3 stop over, but not too out of the norm. A lot of cameras require a bit of exposure compensation. Many do require -1/3 stop to get them more in like with reality. A lot of it has to do with what metering mode you were in. If it were matrix metering (or metering the whole frame) the camera may have noticed that things were relatively dark, so it ups the exposure. If you were using centerweighted metering )or metering just the center of the frame) the camera may have noticed that what you were focusing on was a bit dark and ups the exposure.

    There is a bit of trial and error that comes with shooting an slr camera, even in the auto modes. But that's the fun of it all.

    Do you know how to read histograms? If not I'm sure everyone here would be glad to explain how to understand them so your exposure can get better.
    Nikon D300 | MB-D10 | Nikkor 12-24/4 | Nikkor 50/1.8 | Nikkor 70-200/2.8 VRI | Sigma 18-50/2.8 | SB-800 | SB-80DX (x4) | Radiopopper JrX Studio |

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    3,209
    not for me...not the bird anyway
    40d | 5d mk II | 2.8/16 zenitar fisheye | 16-35L | 35L | sigma 1.4/50 | sigma 2.8/50 Macro | sigma 1.4/85 | 70-200L IS
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    disclaimer: posts are for personal entertainment only...not to be taken seriously...ever.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Amherst, MA
    Posts
    3,249
    The problem with the first shot is that if you expose for the background sky then the bird will be underexposed. So either the sky is blown or the bird is underexposed - too much dynamic range for your sensor to handle - not much you can do about it.

    The other shots look a little overexposed to me, except for the last. I would reduce the exposure a bit, increase contrast and saturation. If you have Lightroom increase the blacks a bit - that does wonders for washed out pics.
    Michael B.
    Canon 5D2, 550D, Sony NEX 5N, Sigma 15mm fish, 24L mkI, 35L, 40mm f/2.8, 50 1.8 II, Sigma 50 1.4, Sigma 50mm f/2.8 macro, 60mm macro, 100mm f/2, 70-200 f/4, 200 f/2.8 mk I, Tamron 28-75 f/2.8, 430EX. Growing list of MF lenses!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    SW Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    26
    very interesting, almost depressing.

    can these shots be doctored or fixed in an image editing software such as photoshop??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kitchener, ONT, Canada
    Posts
    1,225
    They definitely can be fixed... I'll do a tweak tonight when I'm home with some instructions.

    The bird ones, that is why many birders use a flash. The other alternative is to choose a better shooting position, so the sun is at your back and the bird is well lit on the front side.

    The other suggestion is that a lot of green in a shot will fool your camera's meter into overexposing the shot. So for shots like the one of the couple, you need to knock down your exposure compensation by 2/3 of a stop or so, and they will come out better.

    Michaelb's tip about bringing up the blacks is right on for these photos.
    My best pics on Flickr

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kitchener, ONT, Canada
    Posts
    1,225
    For each of these images, I followed a process similar to what I do for mine... This is done in Photoshop Elements 4.0 (yeah, its old)...

    - Adjust 'Levels'. Pull up the blacks to give the photo more contrast, and move the midtone slider to the right also.

    - Adjust saturation. I wanted to up the colours, as they were a bit flat out of the camera (I think that is a Canon standard).

    - Unsharp Mask filter, to sharpen them at bit since they are sized for the web. 100,.3,0 is what I use for web-photos, and adjust slightly based on the image.

    In the small bird photos, I also did a bit of lightening with the 'dodge' brush to bring out the bird a bit. They were a bit dark compared to the rest.

    All 5 images took under 2 minutes to adjust, once you get used it, it goes pretty fast.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    My best pics on Flickr

    Follow me on Twitter: twitter.com/garysimmons
    Like me on Facebook: facebook.com/GarySimmonsPhotography

    Gear: Canon 60D, Sigma 18-50 f2.8 EX DC Macro, Sigma 50-150 f2.8 EX DC II, Canon 50 f1.8, Sigma 10-20 f4-5.6 EX DC, Sigma 120-400 DG OS. 1 430EX, 1 430EXII, 1 580EXII, ST-E2, Manfrotto 190XPROB (soon to be replaced by the carbon version)
    Plus filters, wireless triggers and other junk...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    SW Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    26
    damn gary! that looks great!

    so for software, ill look for elements, and and lightroom, thanks for the tips!

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