Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: using adobe RGB

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    20

    using adobe RGB

    hello all,

    i'm curious to know what advantages/disadvantages there is to using Adobe RGB in the dec function on the alpha 100. From the quick bit of research it seems that Adobe RGB covers more colours in the cyan quadrant than sRGB, so I'm wondering why wouldn't we use this all of the time? is there a drastic disadvantage? I have never actually used it, I normally leave mine on standard or vivid.

    anyone? dust? anyone?
    Sony DSLRA100 w/ SAL18200
    Sony DSCW7B
    Sony DSCW80

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,560

    Lightbulb Give me some space!

    Quote Originally Posted by shanks View Post
    hello all,

    i'm curious to know what advantages/disadvantages there is to using AdobeRGB in the dec function on the alpha 100. From the quick bit of research it seems that AdobeRGB covers more colours in the cyan quadrant than sRGB, so I'm wondering why wouldn't we use this all of the time? is there a drastic disadvantage? I have never actually used it, I normally leave mine on standard or vivid.

    anyone? dust? anyone?
    AdobeRGB is used more for printing than for the Web. If all you are going to do is post your images, then select sRGB for the closest match to the color gamut that the Web uses. You won't lose any color when you transfer your images.

    When you color manage, though, you are trying to match the output of your printer to the image you have taken. AdobeRGB offers a wider range of color, as you have sighted, in the blue, cyan and green areas of the colorspace.

    Name:  adobeRGB.JPG
Views: 461
Size:  44.2 KBName:  sRGB.JPG
Views: 385
Size:  43.6 KB

    Unfortunately, this nice range of color is not usually duplicated on the Web, so here you have this wonderfully deep color spectrum getting literally chopped off, because the web won't reproduce it. Your posted blues and green lack zest, because the highlighted part of the gamut has been truncated. Your printer will reproduce these colors, though, if you select it with your color management controls.

    So while your images lack the kick of AdobeRGB when posted, they will look far more superior when you make that print.

    Remember, Adobe Photoshop CS2/3 will allow converting from AdobeRGB -> sRGB ...

    BUT MAKE A COPY OF THE CONVERSION FILE CREATED

    ... never destroy the original image file by overwriting it. Converting from AdobeRGB to sRGB is a lot better than going the other way, because no matter how hard you may try, you cannot create colors you never had in the first place. If you shoot in sRGB ... you've already limited the range the camera had to capture the image with.

    WORKFLOW:
    1. shoot in AdobeRGB ...
    2. In Photoshop Elements Menu ... Go to "EDIT" > "Color Settings..." > "Full Color Management" (This starts using AdobeRGB in Photoshop Elements and reduces the number of colorspace messages you will get from the PSE program when you start editting your AdobeRGB-images from your camera)
    3. remember to store your original images safely (back them up ... because they are in their biggest and unadulterated form - no information has been lost)
    4. when you are ready to post on the Web, CONVERT the file to a new sRGB-file, preserving and compressing the colors into that smaller colorspace and save it to a separate filename.
    5. post the new sRGB-file
    6. When you decide to print, make sure the printer's colorspace is also set to AdobeRGB ... to maximize its interpretation of your "original" image file. Do not print the sRGB conversion file you made for posting ... it is usually the poorer looking of the two.


    I hope this has not been too confusing. There is a bit of an understanding learning curve here, but nothing monumental.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 09-25-2007 at 03:43 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •