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Thread: Dim Sum

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    2,175

    Dim Sum

    All dim sum sort of stuff that I ate yesterday. For those of you in the area, I ate at Koi Palace.


    1: Egg Tart

    2: Sticky Rice with Chinese Sausage, Egg, and Dried Shrimp

    3: Roasted Pork with Crispy Skin

    4: Shrimp Dumplings topped with XO Sauce

    - Jon
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Awesome photos as always, Jon. The color and exposure are just great.

    I'm just a little curious though, what's it about food that makes it so enjoyable for you to photograph it?
    -Drew

    The world gives me subjects, I just arrange them in a viewfinder.

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  3. #3
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    The short answer is simply because I like food and talking about food. The longer answer follows.

    Part of what I enjoy so much about photographing food in a non-studio setting is that I'm able to share the experience with others and to file it away for myself, so that I can remember the meal.

    A lot of food photography out there is either done in studios, where a lot of faking goes on to make it look the way it does, or is snapped by folks who do it out of custom with a cell phone camera but don't really care for how the shot appears.

    I don't know exactly what you call my style of photography, but I have an interest in capturing presentable photos of food which isn't traditionally taken, namely Chinese food. I also try to put a little bit of effort into my photos given the limitations of the environment (bad lighting, crowded table, 10-15 seconds per dish so that it doesn't go cold!), and I do this to get a decent shot that I can share with others and talk about. After all, it's no fun talking about something if you can't see it!

    I really like talking about food and educating those interested in learning more about how a dish is made, why it tastes like it does, and talking about a cuisine in much detail.

    I hope this answers your question.

    - Jon

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Mhm it does. And I always enjoy your photos so I'm glad you have this particular interest. It's different from what you usually see and that's a great thing in my opinion.
    -Drew

    The world gives me subjects, I just arrange them in a viewfinder.

    Nikon D80
    Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5
    Nikon 50mm f/1.8
    Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 D
    Nikon SB-600 [NEW!]

    New Gallery:
    http://drewsherlock.deviantart.com/



  5. #5
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    Jan 2006
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    I'm very impressed with pics 2 and 3. Very well done.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    35
    [QUOTE=Rex914;252060 I really like talking about food and educating those interested in learning more about how a dish is made, why it tastes like it does, and talking about a cuisine in much detail.- Jon[/QUOTE]

    First and foremost Jon, Awesome Shots!!! It's so lively that I could almost dig in my spoon and fork!

    How about a really serious student? Can I have some info regarding the recipe of Sticky Rice and Rosted Pork dish? You can send me a private message as this might be not be a proper palce to talk regarding this. Look forward.
    Cheers!! - Subrata
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Unfortunately, that happens to be a dish that I do not know the preparation method to. Very few restaurants around here seem to serve it. Many serve the simple leaf-wrapped version though, but I don't know the technique behind making that one either.

    Roasted pork involves purchasing and entire pig (a suckling pig is advised), seasoning it, and then roasting it at a high temperature until the skin turns crispy. This is hard to do at home unless you have a large enough oven. The reason why it has to be a whole pig is because roasting one part would render the meat dry and tough whereas roasting it whole would leave the inside moist and tender thanks to the insulation provided by the skin.

    - Jon

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