Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    14

    New to Digital Cams

    When I take photos, general photos like just say of the kids playing or something, I tend to take a lot of motion blurred images. I try to stay as still as I possibly can but I still have that problem, I do however get a few good pictures but it is after several tries. Landscape pictures are awesome though. Anyway, I was wondering if there is a possibility it is the camera perhaps or maybe its adjustments, for now I usually try to use the defaults in Auto Mode. Or should I just face that my hands are probably not steady enough for the digital camera?

    Some advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Monterey Bay
    Posts
    6,029
    Quote Originally Posted by ruben
    When I take photos, general photos like just say of the kids playing or something, I tend to take a lot of motion blurred images. I try to stay as still as I possibly can but I still have that problem, I do however get a few good pictures but it is after several tries. Landscape pictures are awesome though. Anyway, I was wondering if there is a possibility it is the camera perhaps or maybe its adjustments, for now I usually try to use the defaults in Auto Mode. Or should I just face that my hands are probably not steady enough for the digital camera?

    Some advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks.
    Hi Ruben, we need to know which camera, otherwise we are flying blind.
    D7000, D70, CP990, CP900, FE.
    50mm f/1.8, Sigma 18-125, Sigma 24-70 f/2.8, Nikon 18-105 VR, Nikon 55-200 VR, Nikon 43-86 f/3.5 AiS, Vivitar 28-90 F/2.8-3.5 Macro, Vivitar 75-205 F/3.8-4.8, SB800.
    Ha! See, I can change...


    http://d70fan.smugmug.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    14
    Oh sorry. Toshiba PDR-M81 I traded for a PC lol.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    14
    Anyone? lol

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    901
    Besides being a Toshiba PDR-M81, a little more information such as what shutter speed and ISO setting you are using would be helpful.

    With the little information you are giving, I would think that your shutter speed is pretty slow and your ISO is set to 100. Being in auto mode, 1 way to speed up your shutter speed without using flash is to set your ISO to 200 or 400. This will give you a faster shutter, reducing motion blur.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    2,635

    Re: New to Digital Cams

    Quote Originally Posted by ruben
    When I take photos, general photos like just say of the kids playing or something, I tend to take a lot of motion blurred images. I try to stay as still as I possibly can but I still have that problem, I do however get a few good pictures but it is after several tries. Landscape pictures are awesome though. Anyway, I was wondering if there is a possibility it is the camera perhaps or maybe its adjustments, for now I usually try to use the defaults in Auto Mode. Or should I just face that my hands are probably not steady enough for the digital camera?

    Some advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks.
    Two kinds of blur: Image motion while shutter is open, unsteady camera while shutter is open. Do you get both?
    The first type can be corrected, or at least helped with, as Ray suggested, faster shutter speeds, higher ISO (although raising ISO beyond 100 tends to increase "noise" levels, or "graininess" in your images), wider aperture.
    The second type of blur, unsteady camera blur, and be fixed with a tripod or other stabilizing element like a beanbag or the back of a bench, etc. Or, you can do like I do and use a camera with an image stabilizer, a sort of "electronic tripod." Before these came along, I'd have concluded like you said, "my hands are probably not steady enough for the digital camera," but I'm constantly amazed at how well the "e-tripod" works.
    Let a be your umbrella!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    14
    Good information, ok I did not supply a lot of info, as I said I am fairly new with my digicam, but the information you provided makes sense. Let me change the settings around a bit, I do not know any of the specific settings since I used automode and focus is set to infinity. Let me try a few different settings and see what my results are, thanks guys for the information

    Oh btw, e-tripod LOL! I did not know that existed, I will definetly look into that, tell me, do those do any good for night shots?

    Regards.

    -----------------------

    Ok I just checked, so far I found the ISO setting, it was at 2x. Maybe I need to read more about my camera than I thought :S.
    Last edited by ruben; 08-03-2004 at 12:29 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    14
    Ok I have been playing with it and I set the ISO to normal instead of 2x or 4x. Also I think I am coming to the conclusion that the blurriness is from the poor light conditions. I see that when I use the flash it does not happen. I just do not like using flash because the images usually apear too shiny especially people. I can not find anywhere in the manual that lets me lower the flash intensity so im not too sure about that one. Anymore input would be nice, but you guys have helped lots already :P thanks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    901
    If this is from poor lighting conditions, the only thing you can do to correct this is to get more light to the sensor, make the sensor more sensitive to the available light, or a combination of both with result of making the shutter speed faster.

    To get more light to the sensor, you can either open up the aperture or make more light available. Since you don't want to use the flash, try using the camera in aperture mode if you have it. Set the aperture to the lowest value, probably anywhere from 2 to 5. As you change the aperture to a lower number, you should see the shutter speed get faster. If opening up the aperture doesn't make the shutter speed fast enough to stop the blur, you will either have to increase the available light, or increase the ISO. The available ISO values for you camera are 100, 200 and 400. If you are taking photos at ISO 100, try ISO 200. As you increase ISO, though, beware of the added noise that may be visible in your photos.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    2,635

    re: e-Tripod

    Quote Originally Posted by ruben
    Oh btw, e-tripod LOL! I did not know that existed, I will definetly look into that, tell me, do those do any good for night shots?
    Ruben, "e-Tripod" was my euphemism for "Image Stabilizer." 3 different camera makes right now, Canon (in its S1), Konica Minolta (in their A1, A2, and coming Z3), and Panasonic (in their FZ1, FZ10, and coming FZ3, FZ15, FZ20) offer "image stabilization," or "shake reduction," whichever they choose to call it. Either way, it works to stabilize the camera itself to lower shutter speeds than you can normally get "hand-held," that's why I called it an "e-Tripod," and why I was asking the question about whether your shots were blurred because of subject motion, or shooter motion. Everything that's already been said here still applies towards getting sharper pictures; the image stabilizer just helps that much more for low shutter speeds.
    Let a be your umbrella!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •