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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,456

    Xti + 28-105/f3.5-4.5 lens: first pix try

    my first try with 28-105/f3.5-4.5, and i like this lens a lot.

    as for photos, yep i am novice in this DSLR world and this was a bit rainy day in mountains.

    welcome to give your judgement.
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,456

    here embeded shots data for pix above

    i nearly forgot to add embeded data in my photo.

    1PIX
    Exposure Program: Aperture Priority
    ISO Speed: 100
    Shutter Speed: 1/80.00
    Aperture: f/4.50
    Exposure Bias: 0.00
    Flash Fired: No
    Flash Mode: Off
    Focal Length (mm): 28.00
    Color Space: sRGB

    2PIX
    Exposure Program: Aperture Priority
    ISO Speed: 100
    Shutter Speed: 1/80.00
    Aperture: f/4.50
    Exposure Bias: 0.00
    Flash Fired: No
    Flash Mode: Off
    Focal Length (mm): 28.00
    Color Space: sRGB

    3PIX
    Exposure Program: Aperture Priority
    ISO Speed: 100
    Shutter Speed: 1/400.00
    Aperture: f/5.60
    Exposure Bias: 0.00
    Flash Fired: No
    Flash Mode: Off
    Focal Length (mm): 38.00
    Color Space: sRGB

    4PIX
    Exposure Program: Aperture Priority
    ISO Speed: 200
    Shutter Speed: 1/100.00
    Aperture: f/4.50
    Exposure Bias: 0.00
    Flash Fired: No
    Flash Mode: Off
    Focal Length (mm): 96.00
    Color Space: sRGB

    5PIX
    Exposure Program: Shutter Priority
    ISO Speed: 200
    Shutter Speed: 1/20.00
    Aperture: f/10.00
    Exposure Bias: 0.00
    Flash Fired: No
    Flash Mode: Off
    Focal Length (mm): 105.00

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    476
    Very nice... was that at lake george?
    Tim
    Canon 5D Mark II, 1D Mark II, Rebel XS
    50 F1.4, 85 F1.8, 100 2.8 Macro 70-200 F4L 580EX, 24-70 F2.8L

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,456

    @te1221

    PHP Code:
    Very nice... was that at lake george
    I am in Europe, Austria. The lake is Erlauf lake about 90 miles drive from Vienna. Nice area, actually close to forefront Alps. Shot taken from the boat.

    As DSLR amateur I would appreciate critical comments on my shots. On the lake my main challenge was shooting against water glare and cloudy sky. I wasted about ten shots before came to rather acceptable result. On macro, was just a minute try while sipping coffee on the terrace, and I am not good in macro.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    3,109
    Photos look good (though the last one is soft).

    This is perhaps my most-used lens - Canon 28-105 USM II
    Canon A720 IS, 40D w/ BG-E2N, 28 1.8, 50 1.4, Sigma 70 2.8 macro, 17-40 F4 L, 24-105 F4 L IS, 70-200 F4 L IS, 430 EX, Kenko 2X TC & Ext Tubes, AB strobes and more...
    View my photo galleries here: imageevent.com/24peter

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,456

    more photos, Xti & 28-105 II

    today had a chance to take my little XTi friend to the park, lovely warm day, clear sky. played a bit with exposure and apperture. here is the result.
    Attached Images Attached Images         

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,498
    I know that Don S. suggested a circular polarizer in a different thread.

    I would also like to suggest that you get, and learn to use, a graduated neutral density filter. See how in the two shots of the castle that you took at different exposures where in the first shot the foreground looks too dark but the sky is properly exposed...and then in the next shot, the foreground is properly exposed but the sky is blown out? Well, if you had used a ND grad filter you could have metered for the foreground, but held the sky back two or three stops (depending on the filter) and the entire image would have been properly exposed.

    To pick up on a theme from the other thread: Sometimes gear...and how to use it...does matter!
    Last edited by JTL; 08-01-2007 at 04:23 PM.
    Some Gear: Nikon D700; Nikkor AF-S 50 f/1.4 G; Nikkor AF-S 24-85 3.f/5-4.5 G ED; Tamron 28-300 f/3.5-6.3 VC; Nikon SB-800; Velbon Maxi-F; Canon Pixma Pro 9000; Canon S3IS, Canon SD500; Epson 4990; Epson P5000; Wacom Intuos 3

    Main Software: Capture NX2; Adobe PhotoShop CS2; Corel Paintshop Pro X2 Ultimate

    Sold: Canon XT/350D, EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro; EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5, Sigma 18-200 OS; Canon ET EF 25II; Kenko Pro 300 DG, Canon 430EX, Canon BG-E3.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,456

    @jtl

    wow, i have seen ND filters but could not figure how exactly they could help me. i thought i need only CP...

    thanks a lot, i take a look at this. btw, for filter itself, which brand would you recomnend. in my city most of camera equipment dealers offer Hoya. i had good experience with CP Digital Pro1 but what about their ND? Also, are there different ND filters except for the size?

    sorry i am asking too amateurish questions.
    i am also confused seeing my status changed to Member instead of Junior member which i am in fact. weird...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,498
    Here's a link to a recent post of mine on this topic:

    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/sho...6&postcount=11

    I use both a rectangular and circular ND grad based on the situation. I like the rectangular one that I refer to in link because it is big enough to easily hand-hold and also provide enough coverage for my Canon 10-22mm wide angle lens. For a circular one, I highly recommend the B+W 501 (one stop) and B+W 502 (2 stops). Mine (B+W 502) is 77mm to fit both my 10-22mm and 24-105mm lenes...

    As far as retangular ones go...I've heard good things regarding the Cokin and also the Lee ND grads, but I've never used them so I can't say personally...

    Also, remember, ND filters usally come in hard and soft transition. I find the soft type more flexible, but there are times when a hard transition may be useful as with a sunrise or sunset scene with a relatively unobstructed horizon. Singh-Ray even makes one with a dark line in the middle specially desinged for sunrises and sunsets.
    Last edited by JTL; 08-02-2007 at 06:39 AM.
    Some Gear: Nikon D700; Nikkor AF-S 50 f/1.4 G; Nikkor AF-S 24-85 3.f/5-4.5 G ED; Tamron 28-300 f/3.5-6.3 VC; Nikon SB-800; Velbon Maxi-F; Canon Pixma Pro 9000; Canon S3IS, Canon SD500; Epson 4990; Epson P5000; Wacom Intuos 3

    Main Software: Capture NX2; Adobe PhotoShop CS2; Corel Paintshop Pro X2 Ultimate

    Sold: Canon XT/350D, EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro; EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5, Sigma 18-200 OS; Canon ET EF 25II; Kenko Pro 300 DG, Canon 430EX, Canon BG-E3.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554

    Lightbulb Filter choices abound ...

    While everything has its limitations, the grad filter is a "real time" solution, like the circular polarizer. Post-processing can offer a more controlled "darkening" of the sky than the ND can, but only the polarizer will restore the contrast and highlights lost to glare and mixed light.

    I suppose we all have our own way of doing a shot ... that's why there are all sorts of options. The fun part is ... you can do them all (given the time), using the various filters and see which one offers you the desired effect.

    I usually carry a ten-pack of Cokin filters with me. The durable plastic utility box offers room for ten regular filters or five of the double-width kind (Multi-image and such). You could easily place a grad ND, a CP, ND2, ND4, and whatever else you feel would enhance your shots. Cokin filters are available in two practical sizes (but, there are others): A & P. The "A"-size is used for sub-62mm filter-ring lenses ... the "P" for over 62mm filter ring size lenses. Through a series of filter-ring adapters that fit into the two different sized frames, these frames hold the filter for very quick change-out.

    Good luck with your imaging
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

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