Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    24

    Depth of Field on a point-and-shoot

    Hi, I read that combining a telephoto lens with a wide aperture gives the narrowest depth of field in a D-SLR, but with a point-and-shoot camera (such as my Canon A620), what can I do to achieve (or at least, approach) that kind of narrow depth of field?

    I've tried zooming in with my A620, but the more I zoom in the bigger the aperture number gets, so it really defeats the purpose. For example, with no zoom, I can get an aperture of F/2.7, but if I zoom in to the maximum, the max aperture decreases to F/4.

    Some people told me to attach a macro filter. Do macro filters reduce the depth of field? What about a telephoto filter? Please help me as I'm really confused...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,590
    I can point and shoot with my DSLR, and I can set shot settings up manually with my compact digital, so I prefer to use the term "compact digital" over "point and shoot", the A6XX are more than just point and shoot..

    What really limits a shallow depth of field with a compact digital is the small sensor size, and the matching small focal lengths of the lenses that come with them. Small focal lengths just have a big depth of field.

    So, increasing the focal length will increase shallowness of the depth of field. A macro lens does not do the trick, it just allows you to get closer?
    A tele adapter should give you a more shallow depth of field, since it makes the focal length of the lens system longer.

    Getting quite close with a tele focal length will give you a more shallow depth of field. And using the Av mode, and selecting the biggest aperture (smallest f-number) of course.
    Last edited by coldrain; 07-27-2007 at 03:21 AM.
    Canon EOS 350D, Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 macro, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 DC EX, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM, Tokina AT-X124 Pro 12-24mm F4, Soligor 1.7x C/D4 DG Teleconvertor, Manfrotto 724B tripod, Canon Powershot S30

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Great White North
    Posts
    1,313
    There are 4 things which affect DOF.

    1 - Focal length. The longer the focal length, the shallower the DOF and vice-versa.

    2 - Aperture - The larger the aperture (smaller f number), the shallower the DOF and vice-versa.

    3 - Distance to your subject. The closer the subject, the shallower the DOF and vice-versa.

    4 - Receptor size. The larger the receptor (film or sensor), the shallower the DOF and vice-versa.

    The biggest hurdle that you face is your sensor size. Sometimes it is tough enough getting a shallow DOF with a 1.6x crop sensor DSLR. With a compact digital (just for you Coldy ) it can be downright impossible. The sensor is just too small to narrow the DOF. On the upside, the DOF you get with the small sensor makes for some good macro opportunities. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Newton ,Massachusetts
    Posts
    500
    A shallow depth of field can be achieved with none DLS cameras. The first was taken with Kodak 4800 with a 7X and a 10X close up lenses. The second with Panasonic FZ20. In both cases I used macro mode. No post processing other than sizing and signature.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Panasonic FZ20, Kodak DC4800, Canon SD850 for when I don't want to carry a camera
    http://JLVACCARO.4T.COM

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Tampa, FL, USA
    Posts
    105
    ^^ nice shots. love the first one.
    Canon XTi & SD600

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    Digital compacts have sensors that are very small. It's not indicated on the camera what size the sensor is which does complicate matters.

    Visit DOFmaster.com to see how DOF changes with different sensor sizes.

    With small sensors, DOF is much greater than with larger sensors such as those used on DSLRs.

    It is possible to get shallow DOF but it's hard and dependent entirely for possibility on the camera used. Basically, trial and error!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Newton ,Massachusetts
    Posts
    500
    Quote Originally Posted by cwat212 View Post
    ^^ nice shots. love the first one.
    Thank you. I am amazed at how many of that one I have sold.
    Panasonic FZ20, Kodak DC4800, Canon SD850 for when I don't want to carry a camera
    http://JLVACCARO.4T.COM

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    461

    P&S Supertele "Bokeh"

    Quote Originally Posted by bchen View Post
    Hi, I read that combining a telephoto lens with a wide aperture gives the narrowest depth of field in a D-SLR, but with a point-and-shoot camera (such as my Canon A620), what can I do to achieve (or at least, approach) that kind of narrow depth of field?

    I've tried zooming in with my A620, but the more I zoom in the bigger the aperture number gets, so it really defeats the purpose. For example, with no zoom, I can get an aperture of F/2.7, but if I zoom in to the maximum, the max aperture decreases to F/4.

    Some people told me to attach a macro filter. Do macro filters reduce the depth of field? What about a telephoto filter? Please help me as I'm really confused...
    Go here to see one shot:
    http://new.photos.yahoo.com/amerbiod...804295629828/2
    (Cannot insert Photo)

    and the set: http://new.photos.yahoo.com/amerbiod...0762386256122#
    to see my entire "Bokeh" experiment.

    Each frame is the same mirror ball shot @ camera’s minimum focal length.
    Each focal length gives you a different quality of "Bokeh" but as you can see, some far better than the others. Moving east or west of the ball gave me the different backgrounds.
    Camera: Panasonic DMC-FZ20, all shots @ f/2.8-hand held

    Tricks: get as close to subject as you can while still being able to focus.
    Operate in full manual mode, image stabilizer on (mine was on mode 2)
    Nothing in your background gives you full “Bokeh” (i.e.: had there been no backgrounds in those shots the “Bokeh” would have been astounding.)
    A plain white/pale wall is excellent “Bokeh” background but your subject must not be near the wall.
    Barring a “busy", nearby background, hot-shoe flash does a “good” job with Bokeh.
    The same techniques outlined above in conjunction with the use of TTL hot shoe or on-board flash will simply "blow" out the background, turning it black.
    Last edited by Razr; 07-27-2007 at 08:23 PM. Reason: Failure to load images

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Newton ,Massachusetts
    Posts
    500
    The photo I have attached was taken at maximum zoom. I donít recall if I used Digital zoom also. The butterflies did not want me too close. The lens was set for macro. Even with full zoom I was able to blur the background.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Panasonic FZ20, Kodak DC4800, Canon SD850 for when I don't want to carry a camera
    http://JLVACCARO.4T.COM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •