Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 59
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kitchener, ONT, Canada
    Posts
    1,225
    Rooz makes a very good point above. Don't get this camera at the last minute, get it as soon as you can make your choice.

    I've had my dSLR for over a month now, and I'm only now getting really comfortable with it. You need to practice before you can count on your camera to do what you expect.....
    My best pics on Flickr

    Follow me on Twitter: twitter.com/garysimmons
    Like me on Facebook: facebook.com/GarySimmonsPhotography

    Gear: Canon 60D, Sigma 18-50 f2.8 EX DC Macro, Sigma 50-150 f2.8 EX DC II, Canon 50 f1.8, Sigma 10-20 f4-5.6 EX DC, Sigma 120-400 DG OS. 1 430EX, 1 430EXII, 1 580EXII, ST-E2, Manfrotto 190XPROB (soon to be replaced by the carbon version)
    Plus filters, wireless triggers and other junk...

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    24

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by dustyporch View Post
    Rooz makes a very good point above. Don't get this camera at the last minute, get it as soon as you can make your choice.

    I've had my dSLR for over a month now, and I'm only now getting really comfortable with it. You need to practice before you can count on your camera to do what you expect.....
    O please, you are making me feel really impatient to go out and get my D-SLR camera and lens now!!! :P:P:P

    I know that I "MUST" be getting the items real soon, but nevertheless, I guess I still have to be careful with my selections first right?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    24

    Exclamation If I am not mistaken...

    Quote Originally Posted by coldrain View Post
    The Canon is actually really weather sealed. So if you put it on an 1D, you can put the combination into the streaming rain without any worry. It is not just a rubber ring at the lens mount.

    What is the big plus of the 17-40 is the USM, which makes it focus silent and fast.

    The Sigma is sharper, and the lenses are similar in size and weight.

    Of course, at the wider end you will almost never want to use f2.8. That depth of field is just not useful at the wide end.
    The extra 40-50mm range if the Sigma will get to be useful with for instance portraits, where also the f2.8 starts to be useful.

    All in all, both lenses have their virtues, and I can not tell you which one would be the best choice.
    I think I would prefer the Canon's operation, and the Sigma's optics. But I can only tell for certain if I would be able to use both lenses.
    The Tamron AF 17-50mm f/2.8 SP Di II XR is sharper than the Canon EF 17-40mm f/4 USM L at ALL aperture values including at the MAX F/2.8 aperture right? (According to PhotoZone)

    If the Sigma AF 18-50mm f/2.8 DC EX macro can be better than the Tamron one (above) optically, then I guess that the Sigma lens must be terrific indeed!

    I hope you can understand what I am trying to get across here.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,590
    Maybe you have a store nearby where you can try them both, to get an impression.
    Canon EOS 350D, Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 macro, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 DC EX, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM, Tokina AT-X124 Pro 12-24mm F4, Soligor 1.7x C/D4 DG Teleconvertor, Manfrotto 724B tripod, Canon Powershot S30

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    24

    Post Just to summarize;

    Now I have the Canon EOS 30D with the Sigma AF 18-50mm f/2.8 DC EX macro in mind; modified from the earlier Canon EOS 30D + the Tamron AF 17-50mm f/2.8 SP Di II XR combination.

    Anyway, I am still opened to other suggestions.

    All the best.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    I use Canon lenses. I used to use Tamron lenses. I have the Tamron 28-75 and 17-35. My Canon 17-85 will run rings around them.

    Tamron - slow focussing - inaccurate focussing
    Canon - snaps into focus - very accurate focussing.

    I sold some Tamron glass as it did not perform as well as Canon.

    Don't think every Canon lens is perfect though. The 18-55 kit lens is not great neither is the much vaunted 50mm f1.8. I find both of those to be soft, inaccurate with focus and slow focussing on both my 30D and XT.

    My Canon 17-85 and Canon 70-300 (both IS) just work. They do the job, focussing accurately, precisely and quickly.

    I might eventually get more Canon glass - potentially the 10-22 and something a lot longer than my 70-300.

    To claim Sigma and Tamron are great is pushing it a bit. They're good but not as good as Canon - hence they're cheaper. You pay for what you get with lenses. Pay cheap prices for lenses and you get poor images, get despondent and blame the camera when in fact the lenses are poor.

    Incidentally, I found the same thing with Nikon, years ago. Their lenses were far superior to the likes of Tamron, Tokina etc.

    Let me ask you this question - if Sigma and Tamron were good, how come no pro photographers actually use them?

    Another point.... Jamison started wedding photography. He used to use a Tamron lens but now uses Canon...
    Last edited by Jeff Keller; 07-12-2007 at 09:54 AM. Reason: personal attack removed

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    24

    Post

    Of course, at the wider end you will almost never want to use f2.8. That depth of field is just not useful at the wide end.
    I forgot to respond to this.

    The F/2.8 aperture at the wide end would be invaluable IMO, if I need to use the wide end under less than ideal lighting conditions. (Indoor photography without a flash for example.)

    All the best.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kitchener, ONT, Canada
    Posts
    1,225
    I respect Rhys opinion here, but I disagree with his thinking. You can't just compare one manufacturer against another, blinding saying that everything they make is better (Rhys alludes to this when discussing the kit lens). Just because something is more expensive, that doesn't make it better.... Features and price always play into it too. Everything is a trade-off.

    Think of this. The iPhone is the most expensive mobile phone out there right now. It may or may not be the best phone. But if phone call quality and wide coverage is your primary need, then a $100 on a different carrier would be a FAR better choice.

    Many Canon lenses have IS. IS is expensive and if you need it, its a great feature. But if its not important to you, then spend your money elsewhere.

    Lets do a comparison with the Canon 17-85 and the Sigma 18-50, since they are similar focal lengths and price. The Sigma is faster, the Canon has IS. The Sigma is reported to have better optics. So which do you get? If IS is important to you, Canon. The Canon has more reach too. If you always use a tripod, or don't care about IS on a short lens, then the Sigma is better.

    L lenses are trade-offs too... They are more expensive, and for that you are getting build-quality. Some of them are fantastic performers... Some are just good...

    All I'm trying to say is this: Look at what you want to photograph, and then choose the features of lenses that meet your needs. If Canon is the answer for you, thats great. But the others can be great too.
    My best pics on Flickr

    Follow me on Twitter: twitter.com/garysimmons
    Like me on Facebook: facebook.com/GarySimmonsPhotography

    Gear: Canon 60D, Sigma 18-50 f2.8 EX DC Macro, Sigma 50-150 f2.8 EX DC II, Canon 50 f1.8, Sigma 10-20 f4-5.6 EX DC, Sigma 120-400 DG OS. 1 430EX, 1 430EXII, 1 580EXII, ST-E2, Manfrotto 190XPROB (soon to be replaced by the carbon version)
    Plus filters, wireless triggers and other junk...

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    24

    Question Just curious;

    Will I be able to use the auto-ISO feature of the Canon EOS 30D in it's aperture priority mode, shutter priority mode, and program mode?

    Another question;

    Does the auto-ISO feature of the Canon EOS 30D works from ISO 100 - ISO 3200?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hong Kong, China
    Posts
    32
    Auto-ISO isn't available for the 30D in PASM. I'm not sure if Auto ISO in the scene modes goes to ISO3200, but I would suspect it doesn't (given that 3200 can only be unlocked via a custom function, it appears that Canon wants to conceal this functionality from "greener" photographers).
    S: Panasonic LX1 and LX3
    M: Konica Minolta Dimage A2
    L: Canon EOS 30D with Canon EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM and Sigma 30 f/1.4 HSM
    Zooomr page

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •