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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens question

    I was wondering if anyone is using this Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens. If so, how do you like it?

    I see they make two lens with almost the same name to them. One is the EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens, and the other is the EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III lens. One lens doesn't have the USM to it. What's the difference between the two and what one is the better of the two?

  2. #2
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    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old-Man View Post
    I was wondering if anyone is using this Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens. If so, how do you like it?

    I see they make two lens with almost the same name to them. One is the EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens, and the other is the EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III lens. One lens doesn't have the USM to it. What's the difference between the two and what one is the better of the two?
    I have the IS version of the lens. USM is so much better than the other AF motors. It's faster and more accurate. I used a 17-85 IS USM after dusk and it would snap into focus - my non USM lenses would not have done so.

  3. #3
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    The 75-300 III is/are not a great lens(es). Not very sharp at the long end.
    It will pay to save up a bit to get an EF 70-300 f4-5.6 IS USM. That lens is very sharp over the entire range, into the corners, contrasty and good colour, all in all a great lens that puts all former 75-300 lenses to shame.
    Canon EOS 350D, Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 macro, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 DC EX, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM, Tokina AT-X124 Pro 12-24mm F4, Soligor 1.7x C/D4 DG Teleconvertor, Manfrotto 724B tripod, Canon Powershot S30

  4. #4
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    I have this lens from when I was using it on a Canon Elan 7 film camera. On the film camera I can't complain because you can't pixel peep with film like you can with digital. When I migrated to the digital realm I still used this lens and as long as I didn't look at 100% crops, the images were passable. I purchased a Sigma 70-200 f/2.8 along with a 1.4x Tele-Extender as it's replacement. For the money the Canon 75-300 was OK, but certainly not in the league of more expensive glass.
    A friend of mine has the EF 70-300 f4-5.6 IS USM that Coldrain mentioned and it does capture some images that are sharp and with good contrast.

    http://www.fredmiranda.com/reviews/s...&cat=27&page=3

  5. #5
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    May 2007
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    25
    Quote Originally Posted by coldrain View Post
    The 75-300 III is/are not a great lens(es). Not very sharp at the long end.
    It will pay to save up a bit to get an EF 70-300 f4-5.6 IS USM. That lens is very sharp over the entire range, into the corners, contrasty and good colour, all in all a great lens that puts all former 75-300 lenses to shame.
    So tell me what does the IS do? And you're saying it's worth the extra $400+ over the none IS?

    Since I'm just getting into this, would it be a bad thing to get a used EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens for now, then up grade as I get better with the camera? I can get a real nice used EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM lens for about $130. I'm sure after a year I can get my money back on it by selling it. Then maybe up-grade to the IS.

    I would love to hear your thoughts on this!

    Just want to let you know, I just got a Canon XTI yesterday, so I have never used a SLR camera like this. I do want to learn how to use it, and become a person that loves to take pictures of what I love. What I love is life, so I want to catch every part of it on a camera, so it will be around for years to come.

    Thanks!

    Old-Man

  6. #6
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    The IS refers to the lens having "Image Stabilization" built into it. If you are handholding the lens the IS will compensate for shaking motion of you not being able to hold the camera/lens steady. By doing this it enables you to also use a slower shutter speed which can be an advantage in lower light situations.

    Here's a link that may explain it better than I do...
    http://www.dcviews.com/tutors-t.htm?tt53012

    The 75-300 lens for $130 doesn't sound too bad, at least for a lens to start and learn with, particularly since you're new to SLR's. And as you said, you can always sell it later on. Since it's used make darn sure it works before you buy it. If the seller is willing, maybe you could try it out for a day before making a purchase.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Sydney, Australia
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    Slower Shutter speeds yes...and

    Another thing that is rarely mentioned as an advantage of the "IS", is during focusing.

    When you are looking through the lens at 300mm focal length, and therefore the tendancy for the lens view to move about is at it's greatest, locking on to your subject with Auto Focus becomes easier.
    Canon 5D MKlll & Canon 50D
    Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM | Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM | Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM | Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro | Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM | Canon 50mm f/1.8 | Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 | Canon 430EX Flash | Lowepro Mini Trekker AW | Lowepro Toploader 65 AW | Lowepro Slingshot 200AW | Kata 3n1-10

    Panasonic Lumix FZ200
    Panasonic Lumix TZ7 (aka ZS3)
    Panasonic Lumix FT3 (aka TS3)

    Ali Baba.....the Thief of Bad Gags

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    25
    I think the IS will be a real good thing for me. Does it help a lot on action shots? I will be using this lens for taking picture of moving things a lot. Like kids playing soccer, and kids riding motorcycles.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    Mode 1 is for static objects. Mode 2 is for moving objects so yes - it will cope with moving objects.

    This is a samplefrom my 17-85 IS. See how the IS has steadied the lens enough to get a streak from car lights while keeping the image sharp.
    Last edited by Rhys; 06-04-2007 at 12:32 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    It is not just the IS that is different to the lens, the optics alone are worth the extra in my opinion. They are just a LOT better.
    The IS may help in the long end, since 300mm x 1.6 = 480mm.
    So, anything below 1/500th of a sec will benifit from the IS at the long end of the zoom, and if you have problems holding a camera still, even shutter speeds above 1/500th may benifit.
    Canon EOS 350D, Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 macro, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 DC EX, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM, Tokina AT-X124 Pro 12-24mm F4, Soligor 1.7x C/D4 DG Teleconvertor, Manfrotto 724B tripod, Canon Powershot S30

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