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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Canon Rebel XTI I'm very unhappy with it

    I got a Canon Rebel XTI a month or so ago. I have to say I'm very unhappy with it. The pictures come out real dark in most of the settings. I posted this a few weeks ago and I also called Canon. I was told to adjust the setting on it. My understand is you can only adjust the setting on AV, P, and TV mode. You can't change them in full auto, portrait, landscape, close-up sports, or night portait. If this is true what a waste of a camera. In full sun the pictures come out a lot darker then they are. Can this be fixed in the full auto, portrait, landscape, close-up sports, or night portait mode?

    I just got back from my first nice vacation in over 5 years. This was the main reason for this camera. I have to say 80% of the picture looked like crap if you ask me. I don't know if it's the person behind the camera or the camera. Then to top it the camera stopped working 4 days into the trip. I had to pull out my $120 Nikon camera to finish off the trip.

    I think tomorrow will be another day on the phone with Canon. I'm wonder how many other people have the issue with the dark pictures. I know a number of you have posted you have the same issue.

    Here's a picture in this thread showing how dark they are. This picture was taken in full sun. http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31460

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    God's Country - Australia
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    to have the cam stop working 4 days into the trip is a seperate issue and is obviously a faulty product. just unlucky and this is covered under warranty for sure.

    the photo outcomes are another matter. i suppose to set your mind at ease, the xti is one of the best performing dslr's on the market so its certainly the user and not the camera. you can see from these forums that the xti can produce stunning photos with a little practice and know how.

    the setting adjustability you commented on is common to all cameras, not just the canon.

    Av allows you to adjust aperture
    Tv allows you to adjust shutter speed
    P only allows you to adjust flash essentially

    every manufacturer uses the exact same variables sometimes under slightly different names but these have been around for decades. i had the same settings on my old canon eos500 film camera.

    all other modes, (auto and scene modes), determine settings for the user but often times the results aren;t as good as people expect. there is a significant learning curve going from p&s to dslr. the other thing is that people who buy a dslr just assume that cos its a much better more expensive camera, they don;t have to do anything cos the camera does it all. unfortunately it doesn;t work that way.

    i have noticed a number of people are getting ordinary results and some quite peculiar settings from the 400D's auto settings so maybe the auto adjustments aren't as "novice" friendly as the nikons. i don't know the answer really.

    the most common thing people new to dslr's get wrong is the lighting and exposure. the most common are where the beautiful sunny sky turns out perfect and the people in front are grossly underexpsosed and in shadow. thats a matter of the light and the camera expsoing for the background and not the subjects in the foreground.

    interestingly, the nikons have a tendancy to overexpose and from what coldy is saying the canons underexpose. so the first thing you may need to do is adjust your EV to +0.3 or +0.7 to try and set it right. alternatelty, shoot it in raw and then in post processing, adjust your EV value manually to see how much difference it makes in your photos.

    the other recommendation is to use Av whenever possible and use the smallest number aperture setting, (the widest aperture). look at your shutter speed, if it drops below say 50, then bump your iso up to compensate. Av will produce better results than auto in probably 90% of occasions.

    would also strognly suggest you practice and check what settings other people are using to achieve the results they are getting and replicate those settings.

    it would be really helpful if you posted some of your vacation pics that went wrong for some further help. pics of a fishbowl make it hard to see what may be done to improve. lots of people here who can help and make recommendations to try and get you to enjoy the camera more.

    BTW: its a common issue to have a nikon finish the job a canon couldn't do so don;t be too surprised at that.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    25
    Rooz, thanks for the info. I will post up some picture tomorrow, it's a little to late to do it tonight, will I guess it's morning now (12:16am). LOL

    Thanks for all the other great info. I guess when I was looking at SLR cameras the guy at the store filled me with a bunch of BS when he said anyone can take great pictures with it. I had no idea I was going to have to play with the settings all the time. He said it's a click and shoot camera.

    Talk to you guys tomorrow!

    Old-Man

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rooz View Post
    BTW: its a common issue to have a nikon finish the job a canon couldn't do so don;t be too surprised at that.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Illinois, USA
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    Shooting in raw is a great way to save a picture that was improperly exposed. The software that comes with the camera will let you adjust batches of pictures at the time, so anything in the same lighting that was shot with the same wrong settings can be adjusted with a couple clicks all at once instead of one at a time.

    And if the person selling you a DSLR said it was as easy as a point in shoot... Well technically you CAN just point and shoot. You'll just end up with very mediocre results. Especially with the kit lens.

    Understanding exposure isn't as hard as you might think though. It just takes a little time and experimentation.
    I have a camera. It takes pictures.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Illinois, USA
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    I posted this before, but I think it might be worth posting again in this situation:

    The most simple way to explain shutter speed and aperture; Aperture is almost identical to your pupil. In bright light it gets smaller so your brain receives less signals of light. In the dark, it gets bigger so your brain receives more signals of light. In a camera, the shutter needs to open wider (smaller number, see chart below) to let more light pass to the sensor in dark situations, and open less wide (larger number) when there's more light than the sensor needs to receive.

    Shutter speed is like closing your eyes, and then opening them (then closing them again). If your eyes are closed and you open them for a half second, they won't take in as much light and information as they would if you left them open for say 2 seconds. But any information that is taken in on a camera will simply overlap itself (blurring) for as long as the shutter is open instead of discarding the extra information like our brain does.

    It's just a matter of combining the two (along with ISO, but that's easy enough to figure out on your own aside from the technical aspects of it) at the right combination of taking in the right amount of light, for the right amount of time. For instance, you could have a 20 second exposure at f/22 that turns out with the same exposure as a 1/1500 exposure at f/1.8. There's no set formula for it, it all depends on the lighting. So there's a little bit of trial and error, but hopefully this will give you a basic understanding.

    And here's a picture of various apertures:
    I have a camera. It takes pictures.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    3,109
    There's a lot of good information in this thread and the OP seems happy with the advice he's been given. But I also think Canon sells the XTi as their entry level DSLR with the knowledge that lots of people buying the camera will use it in full auto mode. So to tell the customer to change settings in order to get good photos is a little suspect to me. Canon should sell a camera where 90% of the photos shot in full auto mode are properly exposed.

    I did one photo shoot with an XTi and I noticed within 5 minutes it had metering/exposure issues (and I wasn't shooting in full auto). So it seems disingenous to me to lay the blame at the users feet. I'd ask for my money back from Canon. (My rant )
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
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    14
    Quote Originally Posted by griptape View Post
    Shooting in raw is a great way to save a picture that was improperly exposed. The software that comes with the camera will let you adjust batches of pictures at the time, so anything in the same lighting that was shot with the same wrong settings can be adjusted with a couple clicks all at once instead of one at a time.

    And if the person selling you a DSLR said it was as easy as a point in shoot... Well technically you CAN just point and shoot. You'll just end up with very mediocre results. Especially with the kit lens.

    Understanding exposure isn't as hard as you might think though. It just takes a little time and experimentation.
    Auto on the Canon sucks. JMO but if you have a 400D, the effort to learn the other settings will be worth it, most definately.

    I think the other Canon's P&S have much better auto settings, at least what I can tell from my wife's camera. Me personally, I am not touching her camera if I can snap with my dRebel instead! :-)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    6,590
    Quote Originally Posted by Old-Man View Post
    I got a Canon Rebel XTI a month or so ago. I have to say I'm very unhappy with it. The pictures come out real dark in most of the settings. I posted this a few weeks ago and I also called Canon. I was told to adjust the setting on it. My understand is you can only adjust the setting on AV, P, and TV mode. You can't change them in full auto, portrait, landscape, close-up sports, or night portait. If this is true what a waste of a camera. In full sun the pictures come out a lot darker then they are. Can this be fixed in the full auto, portrait, landscape, close-up sports, or night portait mode?
    You never read or responded in the earlier tread you posted. Already we tried to make you understand that your under exposing was user error induced, meaning you will have to understand how a camera meters exposure... you would have under exposed photos with ANY camera with the same settings.

    Quote Originally Posted by Old-Man View Post
    I just got back from my first nice vacation in over 5 years. This was the main reason for this camera. I have to say 80% of the picture looked like crap if you ask me. I don't know if it's the person behind the camera or the camera. Then to top it the camera stopped working 4 days into the trip. I had to pull out my $120 Nikon camera to finish off the trip.
    No idea what to say to this, you don't post any pictures that "look like crap. So how can we tell you what you do wrong.
    And how did your camera "stop working". Dead battery? Was it broken?
    There is no real "severe underexposing" problem with the XTi, and if yours actually broke, that is just bad luck. Just look around on internet and this forum, you will see many people making many nice photos with an XTi/400D, without taking special measures for exposure. If you are not prepared to actually discuss problems, and just post once and let the thread die, how can we try and help you figure out what you have to watch out for in certain situations, and explain what you do "wrong"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Old-Man View Post
    I think tomorrow will be another day on the phone with Canon. I'm wonder how many other people have the issue with the dark pictures. I know a number of you have posted you have the same issue.

    Here's a picture in this thread showing how dark they are. This picture was taken in full sun. http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31460
    I explained in that thread WHY the photo is darker than you would expect it to be. You will have that problem with ANY photo camera, if you tell the camera to expose automatically on that blue, as the camera sees the bright light blue, thinks it should be a mid tone, and therefore underexposes to get the blue to show a mid tone blue.
    This will happen with a Nikon, a Pentax, a Sony, a Panasonic and what not.
    So.... try to understand exposure and camera metering, and try to adjust when necessary. You could for instance have metered with the [( )] mode on a goldfish. This would have made the photo a lot brighter than metering on the bright blue water. As long as you let the camera determine exposure from the bright blue, you will always get a too dark photo. Simple.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by 24Peter View Post
    There's a lot of good information in this thread and the OP seems happy with the advice he's been given. But I also think Canon sells the XTi as their entry level DSLR with the knowledge that lots of people buying the camera will use it in full auto mode. So to tell the customer to change settings in order to get good photos is a little suspect to me. Canon should sell a camera where 90% of the photos shot in full auto mode are properly exposed.

    I did one photo shoot with an XTi and I noticed within 5 minutes it had metering/exposure issues (and I wasn't shooting in full auto). So it seems disingenous to me to lay the blame at the users feet. I'd ask for my money back from Canon. (My rant )
    There is nothing strange going on with the XTi in automatic modes, just that it sets the metering to [(.)].
    If you want to set the camera to different metering modes (partial metering: [( )], or center weighted: [ ] ), you have to set your camera to P, Av, Tv, M or A-DEP.

    Comparing an XTi with an XT seems to show a very light underexposure for the XTi, nothing strange or weird at all.
    The two photos the OP posted in the other thread were more or less properly exposed, the goldfish photo was shot into bright water with sun on it, and the OP finds it odd the goldfish are too dark... Same as making a photo with very bright sky, and wondering why the landscape looks a bit dark.
    Canon EOS 350D, Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 macro, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 DC EX, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM, Tokina AT-X124 Pro 12-24mm F4, Soligor 1.7x C/D4 DG Teleconvertor, Manfrotto 724B tripod, Canon Powershot S30

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