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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    549

    exact aperture/shutter speed/iso value for night outdoor shots

    Hi everyone,

    I like to take shots of lights in the night as in lighted buildings along a river,lighted yatchs,moonlight on sea etc. What would be the exact values for aperture/shutter speed/ISO to get a perfect shot?
    Also, are there any lenses specific to night photography?

    many thanks and best regards
    Chili !


    PENTAX K10D
    SMCP FA 18-55MM
    SMCP FA 50MM 1.4
    SMCP FA 80-200MM
    TAMRON 28-75MM 2.8



    Life is what happens to you when you are busy making other plans.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Rochester,New York
    Posts
    464
    I like to take shots of lights in the night as in lighted buildings along a river,lighted yatchs,moonlight on sea etc. What would be the exact values for aperture/shutter speed/ISO to get a perfect shot?
    There is just no way that anyone could give you this information without knowing the lighting in each shot because every setting you mentioned will be different. It's best to use a tripod (allows you to use longer shutter speeds),set the camera to the maximum ISO that you want to use and I usually use AV mode where you set the aperture to the lowest setting(remember the lower the number, the more light the lens allows in) and try that...the camera will select the shutter speed for you. Since you are not wasting film..try several settings to see which one gives you the desired result that you are looking for.
    Doug
    Pentax K200D,Pentax 18-250,Sigma 70-300 APO DG macro
    Kodak Z915
    http://picasaweb.google.com/pas49ras

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    549
    Pas49ras......thanks for your answer. Can you suggest some combinations of A+SS+ISO that I could try at night?

    What are the ratios of A and S to work with in diff conditions? If you know please suggest a link for a tutorial on this subject.

    Many thanks and best regards
    Chili !


    PENTAX K10D
    SMCP FA 18-55MM
    SMCP FA 50MM 1.4
    SMCP FA 80-200MM
    TAMRON 28-75MM 2.8



    Life is what happens to you when you are busy making other plans.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    2,635

    I think he gave you the answer already...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lilchilichoco View Post
    Pas49ras......thanks for your answer. Can you suggest some combinations of A+SS+ISO that I could try at night?

    What are the ratios of A and S to work with in diff conditions? If you know please suggest a link for a tutorial on this subject.

    Many thanks and best regards
    Once you set Aperture (to the lowest number, for maximum light) and ISO (to the highest number you can tolerate, for maximum sensitivity), the only variable left is shutterspeed, which the camera can then choose to give an optimum exposure. I don't know which camera you use, but one more thing you could vary if setting the above doesn't satisfy would be the "Exposure Bias", which on my camera is done by adjusting the EV level +/-, depending on whether you need more or less exposure. But as he also said, the key is to go ahead and take the photos, and get your feet wet. Once you see some results, you'll know whether you want to increase or decrease exposure.
    Let a be your umbrella!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Rochester,New York
    Posts
    464
    What are the ratios of A and S to work with in diff conditions? If you know please suggest a link for a tutorial on this subject.
    At night..you are going to need a tripod..or a solid resting spot for your camera because unless you have a brightly lit subject or a extreamly fast lens..it will be tough to hand hold,even with IS ..try 800 ISO for starters and try different AV and shutter speeds.


    Some good links..they talk about film speed but sensor ISO is the same value.
    http://www.robert-barrett.com/photo/exposure.html

    http://photo.net/learn/making-photographs/exposure
    Last edited by pas49ras; 03-13-2007 at 12:40 PM.
    Doug
    Pentax K200D,Pentax 18-250,Sigma 70-300 APO DG macro
    Kodak Z915
    http://picasaweb.google.com/pas49ras

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    549
    John Reed....!!! After a long long time.....

    I guess what I am asking here is.....how do A,SS and ISO work together....and pas49ras just sent me a link. Thanks million pas.

    best regards
    Chili !


    PENTAX K10D
    SMCP FA 18-55MM
    SMCP FA 50MM 1.4
    SMCP FA 80-200MM
    TAMRON 28-75MM 2.8



    Life is what happens to you when you are busy making other plans.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Windy Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    2,605
    As pas49ras said, it varies with each shot. But here are some examples (sorry for the reposts.)

    30 seconds, f/4.5, ISO 200
    Here, the sky was pretty dark. The long exposure created the blue/purple sky. The moon had been "gibbous" (between quarter and full.) The sky was misty and created the nearly round halo.
    Name:  Night Moon resized.jpg
Views: 19603
Size:  20.2 KB

    13 seconds, f/11, ISO 200
    This was at dusk, so the sky was still blue.
    Name:  Factory 6336 resized.jpg
Views: 8620
Size:  38.5 KB

    1/100 sec., f/6.3, ISO 200 (I added noise on this one for effect)
    Here, I wanted to be able to see details on the streetlamp, so I didn't need a long exposure.
    Name:  Sage Lamp 6013 w-noise resized.jpg
Views: 8602
Size:  40.1 KB

    Hope that helps give you an idea. As you can see, I didn't use a higher ISO on any of these shots. With stationary objects, you usually don't need to, because you can use the longest shutter speed you want, along with your tripod An example of needing higher ISO would be at a party or concert, where you have low light combined with moving subjects. I don't have any good shots in those conditions yet.

    Basically, the brighter the available light, the shorter shutter speed and the lower ISO. A larger aperture (smaller f/number) will enable a shorter shutter speed and lower ISO, and create "halo" effects around the lights. A small aperture will create "star" effects, such as in the factory above.

    Have you decided which camera yet?
    Last edited by toriaj; 03-13-2007 at 07:12 PM.
    Nikon D50, Nikkor 18-55mm, Nikkor 50mm 1.8, Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro, Tokina 12-24
    Flickr

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    181
    I like simply using auto exposure metering and setting exposure value somewhere between -1 and -2, depending on how light (-1) or dark (-2) the night scene looks. Set the camera on a wall or garbage can, and use the 2 sec timer to trip the shutter. From a A710 and S230:






  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    549
    Hi toriaj, lovely shots....I love the star effect!!! and I love the color in the first one and the lamp is so full of mystery!!

    Gee....yeah....I just got a pentax K10d but I am quite confused as I've never ever used a real camera....so I'm bugging everyone there on the Pentax dslr forum asking all kinds of "huh?" questions.........

    Thanks for the summing up toriaj......I am in the "absorbing info" stage

    reappans, thanks for your tip as well....I'll try that out as well....

    I guess reading up and trying diff equations should help. Thanks pas for your tip as well....I guess I'd better run out and get a tripod...

    many many thanks
    best regards
    Chili !


    PENTAX K10D
    SMCP FA 18-55MM
    SMCP FA 50MM 1.4
    SMCP FA 80-200MM
    TAMRON 28-75MM 2.8



    Life is what happens to you when you are busy making other plans.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Windy Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    2,605
    Congratulations on getting your new camera! I look forward to seeing your shots.
    Nikon D50, Nikkor 18-55mm, Nikkor 50mm 1.8, Sigma 70-300mm APO DG Macro, Tokina 12-24
    Flickr

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