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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Darien, Il (SW Burbs of Chicago)
    Posts
    126

    Suggestion on format for my upcoming casual wedding shoot

    Ok, I asked early about renting a lens for my friends wedding, I opted not to do that, but now I am wondering what you guys think about shooting in the RAW+JPG format?

    I have not really played around with RAW yet, and I know it is the way to go, but I don't want to screw up and experiment this weekend.

    I know if I shoot RAW+JPG I will at least have the jpg to fall back on, but is it worth it, or should I just stick with what I know for this and just shoot jpg fine and mess with RAW when I don't care if I screw it up?

    thanks for you thoughts,
    Phil
    Nikon D50
    Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 ED
    Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom
    Nikkor 50mm F/1.8
    Nikon SB-600 (New for Xmas '08)
    LowePro Slingshot 200 Bag

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    214
    A few things about shooting RAW...

    First, it's more work.
    Second, you have more digital information to play with, so more latitude in what you do,
    Third, if you work in RAW and save to JPEG, your original raw file is still there, so nothing's lost. Still a good idea to make a second directory of the original images, though.
    Fourth, RAW+JPEG gives you a low-resolution JPEG, not suitable for real printing.

    You say this is a casual shoot, so I assume you are not THE photographer. With that in mind, I think you are safe in using RAW and getting some experience in the RAW workflow. It's still important to use good technique, though...RAW can rescue a lot of things but focus, for instance, isn't one of them. RAW is great when the light is variable in tone, that is, if you are going to be shooting in a place that has some natural daylight, some incandescent, some from another type of bulb. You can affix a white balance individually to each picture as it needs it.

    What software do you use for your RAW editing?
    Last edited by tekriter; 03-01-2007 at 09:56 AM.
    Nikon D300
    Nikkor 50mm 1.8
    Nikkor 85mm 1.8
    Tokina 12-24
    Nikkor 18-55
    Sigma 18-50 2.8
    Sigma 18-200
    Nikkor 80-200 f2.8
    2 Nikon SB-800s

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Darien, Il (SW Burbs of Chicago)
    Posts
    126
    I don't think they have a true photographer, but they aren't looking for me to do everything, just some before and after stuff, casual photo's of the grooms party and the bride's party, stuff like that.

    I know the benefits and limits of both RAW and JPG, just haven't take the time to work in RAW yet.

    I took 1 shot 1 time and used PSPX, which is my main PP software that I use.

    I know the jpg is a low quality in the raw+jpg, but it would at least give me something in case I really screw up and don't have a clue on the RAW PP process.

    But I am not sure.

    Phil
    Nikon D50
    Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 ED
    Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom
    Nikkor 50mm F/1.8
    Nikon SB-600 (New for Xmas '08)
    LowePro Slingshot 200 Bag

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,148
    Ok. You can't screw it up because you shoot raw instead of jpg. When I first switched to raw, i did raw + jpg. soon after I just went raw. I do shoot jpg on occasion but only with good reason. Otherwise I shoot raw, because it is HARDER to screw up raw than jpg.

    WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

    You need more memory when shooting raw. If you are shooting an event it is important to have more than one card rather than one huge card. It would really suck if one of your cards went bad during a wedding. It would suck much more if you lost ALL of your images because one card went bad! Small chance of this happening, but still a chance. Don't take unnecessary chances.

    Also, make sure you have an extra battery, extra batteries for your flash, etc.

    If you can swing an SB-600 flash get one. If you can swing a ~$100 50mm f/1.8 GET ONE.

    Take a backup camera even if it is a point n shoot.

    Just noticed you said you used PSPX - I have that app, and use it for part of my work-flow. I think it is great. But it is EXTREMELY limited in the raw workflow compared to other converters like Bibble, NSX, etc.

    ---added---

    The burst mode on my D70s is faster for the first few shots shooting raw than shooting jpg. And of course MUCH faster than shooting both. However, after the buffer fills up the burst on jpg is faster. This must have to do with the jpg conversion time vs raw write time.
    Last edited by tcadwall; 03-01-2007 at 10:34 AM.
    Nikon D70s
    Nikkor 50mm 1.8D (If you don't have it you need it)
    Nikkor 18-200mm VR II
    SB-600
    Bogen/Manfrotto Tripods/Heads
    NAS (D300, Nikkor 80-200mm (or 70-200mm)f/2.8, Tamron 90mm Macro)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,929
    Shoot RAW, that way if you do mess something up, you can fix it in PP. Although, we all know you wont mess up
    Jason

    "A coward dies a thousand deaths, a soldier dies but once."-2Pac


    A bunch of Nikon stuff!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Darien, Il (SW Burbs of Chicago)
    Posts
    126
    I will try it out and see what happens. I just hope I don't freak out and screw up.

    I don't think I will be able to talk the wife in to the flash and lens as we have been spending to much money lately. Maybe I can talk her in to the lens though.

    I will have to look in to Bibble and NSX and see what I can do with those.

    Still a little scared, but I'm gonna do my best. I can say I don't have as much confidence in myself as Jcon seems to have in me though. I'm still learning at all this and just muddling my way through it all.

    thanks for all the help though,
    Phil
    Nikon D50
    Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 ED
    Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom
    Nikkor 50mm F/1.8
    Nikon SB-600 (New for Xmas '08)
    LowePro Slingshot 200 Bag

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Grafton, MA
    Posts
    1,714
    If it's a choice between the flash and the lens, go with the flash and use the lenses you have. An external flash with bounce capabilities will make far more of a difference in the quality of your photos than a whiz bang lens with the pop up flash. It will even make more of a difference than raw vs jpeg (a poorly exposed RAW photo is still a poorly exposed photo). I know a flash isn't as sexy as a new lens, but trust me when I say it is the most valuable tool you can bring to a wedding.
    www.jamisonwexler.com

    Canon 5dII|Canon 5D|Canon 40D|Sigma 15 f2.8|Canon 35 f1.4|Canon 50 f2.5|Canon 50 f1.8|Canon 85 f1.2|Canon 17-40 f4|Canon 18-55 f3.5-5.6 IS|Canon 24-105 f4 IS|Canon 28-105 f3.5-4.5|Canon 70-200 f2.8 IS|Canon 75-300 f4-5.6 IS|Kenko 1.4x TC|Canon 580ex X3|Canon 380exII |Canon 420ex|Sunpak 383 x4|Sunpak 120j x2|Sunpak 622|Elinchrom Skyports

    Past Gear

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,148
    Since you say you are not being asked to take pictures during the ceremony, then the flash is the more important tool.

    However -

    It is rare for a flash to be allowed during the ceremony. Even if it is allowed, I think it is rude.

    So if you would like to get ANY pictures during the wedding, you will either have to be rude, have a high failure rate, or have a fast lens, (or worst case if it is not allowed, you might get kicked out by the church).
    Nikon D70s
    Nikkor 50mm 1.8D (If you don't have it you need it)
    Nikkor 18-200mm VR II
    SB-600
    Bogen/Manfrotto Tripods/Heads
    NAS (D300, Nikkor 80-200mm (or 70-200mm)f/2.8, Tamron 90mm Macro)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,929
    Jamison and Tcad beat me to the punch. If its a choice between the two, get the flash!

    I know what youre going through, my first time was nerve racking and since it was a friend, even more pressure. The best advice I can lend is to find out exactly what the bride wants photos of. Make a checklist, go over it the night before, and take it with you just in case. Its much, much easier if you go into it with a "gameplan" as apposed to just "winging" it. Remember, you are the one in charge, you tell people where to stand and how to look, dont be afraid to take charge!

    Relax, you know what youre doing and you will do just fine!
    Jason

    "A coward dies a thousand deaths, a soldier dies but once."-2Pac


    A bunch of Nikon stuff!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlsbad CA
    Posts
    523
    i shoot raw+jpeg cuz i got 7 memeory cards and dsont care lol.
    sony A300
    tamron 17-50 2.8
    Sony SAL 11-18
    Sony 35 1.8

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