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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    Hyperfocal technique

    Using my 35mm manual focus kit, I could focus on subject A, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then focus on subject B, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then rotate the focus to midway beween the two and select an aperture corresponding to the distances - as listed on the dof scale. I could take the picture and know it was right.

    How do I do this with these AF only cameras such as the XT?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    There's a mode called "A-Dep". Is that what you're looking for?
    Wesan

    "Analogue"/film cameras
    Agfamatic 2000
    Canon EOS 600 (SLR)
    Fujifilm Fotonex 310ix (APS)

    Digital cameras
    Samsung Digimax 101
    Canon Powershot S3IS

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    539
    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys View Post
    Using my 35mm manual focus kit, I could focus on subject A, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then focus on subject B, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then rotate the focus to midway beween the two and select an aperture corresponding to the distances - as listed on the dof scale. I could take the picture and know it was right.

    How do I do this with these AF only cameras such as the XT?
    Uhmmm... what exactly is an "AF only" mean here with the XT? Does the MF switch on the lens disappear when you hook it up to an XT?

    Anyway...are we under the premise that the same lens with the DOF scale cannot be used on the XT? If not, then why can't you use the same technique? I mean, AF center point on both objects, note the distance scale numbers (not DOF scale as you stated btw), then turn the focus ring so the aperture mark is halfway, then read off the DOF scale and set the aperture in the body. Will this not work???

    If you mean that the lens has no DOF scale (which includes a bunch of EF/EF-S Canon lenses), then bring a hyperfocal chart and a laser to measure distance, if you're so inclined. lol

    Or a common heuristic is to focus a 3rd of the way into the scene... so i guess between two objects would be a 3rd of the way of the depth between the two.
    To err is human, to crop divine.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys View Post
    Using my 35mm manual focus kit, I could focus on subject A, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then focus on subject B, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then rotate the focus to midway beween the two and select an aperture corresponding to the distances - as listed on the dof scale. I could take the picture and know it was right.

    How do I do this with these AF only cameras such as the XT?
    is this a trick question?
    40d | 5d mk II | 2.8/16 zenitar fisheye | 16-35L | 35L | sigma 1.4/50 | sigma 2.8/50 Macro | sigma 1.4/85 | 70-200L IS
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    disclaimer: posts are for personal entertainment only...not to be taken seriously...ever.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam75south View Post
    is this a trick question?
    No. If the hyperfocal scale is missing from Canon lenses and AF controls focussing then there must be some way to get adequate hyperfocal DOF unless the camera companies have cocked up royally!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
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    you could shoot f/22 all the time.
    40d | 5d mk II | 2.8/16 zenitar fisheye | 16-35L | 35L | sigma 1.4/50 | sigma 2.8/50 Macro | sigma 1.4/85 | 70-200L IS
    website
    disclaimer: posts are for personal entertainment only...not to be taken seriously...ever.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sweden
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhys View Post
    Using my 35mm manual focus kit, I could focus on subject A, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then focus on subject B, check the distance against the dof scale on the lens then rotate the focus to midway beween the two and select an aperture corresponding to the distances - as listed on the dof scale. I could take the picture and know it was right.

    How do I do this with these AF only cameras such as the XT?
    Rhys, if I understand you correctly, you want the depth of field to cover subjects A and B. Is that correct?

    If that's the case, the XT (and other models) have a mode called "A-Dep". This helps you control the depth of field automatically. Here is a quote from the XT manual:

    A-DEP Automatic Depth-of-Field AE

    This mode is for obtaining a wide depth of field automatically between a near subject and a far subject. It is effective for group photos and landscapes. The camera uses the seven AF-points to detect the nearest and farthest subjects to be in focus.

    Does this information help you? The manual describes more in detail, how to use A-Dep.
    Wesan

    "Analogue"/film cameras
    Agfamatic 2000
    Canon EOS 600 (SLR)
    Fujifilm Fotonex 310ix (APS)

    Digital cameras
    Samsung Digimax 101
    Canon Powershot S3IS

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    I think what Rhys is talking about is the scale that used to be on a lens. You set your aperture and then focused and the scale showed the range of the dof. Here is a shot of my old Canon FD28. I have this set for f8 (bottom row of numbers) and I'm focused on something at 5' (the top green numbers). This would give dof from 3.5' to 10'.

    I don't know how you do it now because most lenses do not have this anymore. Only my EF85 f1.8 has anything and it is only f22.
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    Dennis

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