Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,251

    Question sRGB vs Adobe RGB

    Hey folks--

    I'm confused. Bryan Peterson and Scott Kelby both write that sRGB should be used if images are to be displayed on a computer, and that Adobe RGB is for images that will be printed on an inkjet. I've seen lots of stuff on the web that agrees with this, and other stuff that says it doesn't matter which you choose. The Canon XTi manual says that Adobe RGB "is mainly used for commercial printing and other industrial uses."

    I want images that will look good on a computer and that will also generate nice prints on a home inkjet. Which color space should I use? Also, does shooting in jpg vs RAW enter into the question?

    Thanks
    Adam
    -------------
    Canon 60D & lenses & flashes & stuff
    A bunch of cheap vintage film cameras


    My Etsy store

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Nsw Oz.
    Posts
    916

    Adam,

    .... my understanding is that the adobeRGB has more colours or to be more accurate more tonal values than the sRGB. I'd choose the same on my computer that is on my camera, for me thats adobeRGB. If I'm wrong someone will put you right.
    Kev.

    D200~
    24-70mm f2.8 , 50mm f1.8, 70-200 f2.8 VR.more

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,251
    Hi Kev--

    I have a choice as to which color space to set my camera on. I looking for advice on which to choose...
    Adam
    -------------
    Canon 60D & lenses & flashes & stuff
    A bunch of cheap vintage film cameras


    My Etsy store

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    756
    sRGB will also generate decent prints on a inkjet. The primary difference is that the Adobe RGB space, while containing the same absolute number of different colors, is "stretched" to cover richer cyan and greens. These colors won't be displayed on a monitor but can show up in prints.

    Assuming you're saving 8-bit images, there's the same absolute number of different colors available; they're just arranged over a different area of all possible colors.

    If your image doesn't have many of the "extended" colors, you're not gaining anything and in fact losing because there's fewer bits left over to cover the remaining colors.

    My advice is to set it for sRGB and not worry about it unless you're primarily taking pictures of landscapes for print.

    Also, I highly recommend the book "Mastering Color Digital Photography", by Michael Freeman. It's pretty new, so I had to get it on interlibrary loan, but conversely it'll be in a lot of bookstores right now. It covers this and a lot of other fascinating color related topics specifically applied to digital photography.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    756
    Oh yeah, I also want to add that since your computer monitor can't display Adobe RGB, it makes it hard to do accurate color correction. If you're going to be doing that kind of thing, you literally have to tweak, print, tweak, print -- time consuming and expensive.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,251
    Mattdm--

    Thanks-- that clears it up.

    Adam
    Adam
    -------------
    Canon 60D & lenses & flashes & stuff
    A bunch of cheap vintage film cameras


    My Etsy store

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    If you shoot RAW it doesn't matter as you can choose it when you convert. However, I use sRGB when I do convert. It is my understanding that Adobe RGB is best used if you are using CMYK and going to send it to a printing press. Use sRGB for stuff on your monitor and inkjet printing.
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    City of Lights, City of Casinos, City of Sin -- Must be Las Vegas!
    Posts
    1,512
    sRGB was conceived as a multipurpose color space standard . . . It is essentially a compromise color space which all digital cameras and inkjet printers and monitors are able to match. sRGB aims to match the color gamut of a typical 2.2 gamma PC monitor . . . It is an ideal color for web design but unsuitable for photography or serious print work. This is mainly because the sRGB space clips the CMYK gamut quite severely. . . .
    * * * * *
    Adobe RGB (1998) has become establish as the recommended RGB editing space for RGB files that are destined to be converted to CMYK . . . I have adopted Adobe RGB as my preferred RGB working space, since it has a larger color gamut and is particularly suited for RGB to CMYK color conversions.
    Adobe Photoshop CS2 for Photographers, p. 488-489, by Martin Evening, Focal Press 2005.
    Canon G10 - Nikon D3 - Sony P&S - Flickr Account - Non-updated Website

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Nsw Oz.
    Posts
    916

    Lightbulb

    ..Thom Hogan pretty much says the same too. I just went through reformatting my screen into sRGB, hmmmm, might go back to what I had. If you have to ask, read the whole thread again.
    Kev.

    D200~
    24-70mm f2.8 , 50mm f1.8, 70-200 f2.8 VR.more

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,251
    ...it's now once again unclear.
    Adam
    -------------
    Canon 60D & lenses & flashes & stuff
    A bunch of cheap vintage film cameras


    My Etsy store

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •