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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2

    digital or digital SLR?

    Would someone kindly tell me what is the difference between a digital camera and a digital SLR camera?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    1,680
    - Digital SLR does not use the LCD screen for "framing" a photo when shooting (ie. you must use the view finder)
    - Digital SLR allows you to look through the "lens"
    - No shutter lag with Digital SLR

    - Digital "Point and Shoot" camera has less scope for experimenting
    - Digital P&S will give an indication on the LCD screen if your shutter and aperture settings are incorrect by showing the "result" before you take the picture.

    Both formats have advantages and disadvantages.
    Canon 5D MKlll & Canon 50D
    Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM | Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM | Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM | Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro | Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM | Canon 50mm f/1.8 | Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 | Canon 430EX Flash | Lowepro Mini Trekker AW | Lowepro Toploader 65 AW | Lowepro Slingshot 200AW | Kata 3n1-10

    Panasonic Lumix FZ200
    Panasonic Lumix TZ7 (aka ZS3)
    Panasonic Lumix FT3 (aka TS3)

    Ali Baba.....the Thief of Bad Gags

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    464
    I would go with a DSLR. With a digital point-and-shoot, thats basically all you can do: point it, and click. Ofcourse with very little settings allowed.

    Together with the differences already suggested by Honest Gaza.
    Digital point-and-shoot (P&S) are small and portable, which makes it the ideal candidate to bring with you in your travels. However, I bring my Canon Rebel XTi 400D with me anywhere I go, without the hassle of its size difference.

    Point-and-shoots are also a lot cheaper than your average DSLR.

    Having a DSLR will also provide you with a much more thorough learning curve, which comes with a tonne of fun! You will have more versatility in choosing the appropriate lenses for your type of photography, i.e. macro, landscape, portrait, night, indoor, nature, sports, and heeps more.,

    If you have extra to spend, I would go with something minimal, such as the new released Nikon D40. Which if I'm not mistaken is the most economical in the DSLR range.

    You can only take so many shots with a point-and-shoot. With a DSLR you can take several shots, each with their own setting to suit your liking.

    Canon Rebel XTi 400D, 18-55mm Kit lens, 50mm f/1.8, Canon L 70-200mm/2.8 IS USM, Canon macro 100mm/2.8
    Lowepro Slingshot AW 300, minipod, CF cards, B+W polarizing filter f-pro MRC, Cokin filters

    On the list: 1.4x tele-extender, Canon 580EX flash, *LCD protector, CF card reader, Canon EF-S 10-22mm (wide angle lens), Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    Posts
    138
    SLR stands for Single Lens Reflex. It means that when you look through the viewfinder you are looking through the lense via a set of mirrors or a prism and a mirror. One of the mirrors is in front of the sensor, and when you take the picture the mirror flips out of the way so that the light coming through the lens can reach the sensor. What is commonly called a digital camera has the light from the lens always on the sensor. You view the image either through an optical viewfinder separate from the camera lens, or on the LCD which is showing you what the sensor sees.

    Digital SLRs have a few advantages: The biggest, in my opinion, is that you can change the lens, giving you much flexibility. Another is that the sensors are usually physically larger for a given number of pixels, which often can result in a better image. The disadvantage of the SLR is that, with a few exceptions, you can't get a live preview of what the sensor sees like you can with a (non SLR) digital camera. This means you don't always hold the camera up to your eye. SLRs are larger than most digital cameras, and usually more expensive.

    So the advantages of the digital camera are the live preview, smaller size, and usually lower cost.

    The above is a simplification, but I hope it answers your question.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    So Calif
    Posts
    3,226
    Just a bit of clarification to another post in the thread. Many "point-and-shoot" cameras DO allow full manual controls (shutter, aperture, white balance) etc, so you CAN control your shots if you don't want to fire away on auto.

    Check out any of the popular Canon digicams (A540, A630, S3IS) highly-rated right here in the DCRP buyers guide.

    But yes, the 2 major "limitations" are shutter lag (mostly affects moving-subject shots) and lack of interchangeable lenses (conversion lenses are not so good). But what I like best about my Canon A620 is the flip out LCD. I don't have to jam the viewfinder against my glasses (already scratched from my DSLR) and you can casually shoot from waist-level without being too intrusive. Oh, and it does 9-minute movies. DSLR have no flip out LCD and can't do movies.

    Those 2 limitations are what lead me to a DSLR, but I'm not giving up the A620.
    Last edited by SpecialK; 12-09-2006 at 10:37 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    1,680
    Although the focal lengths of the lenses may have an "equivalent" value.....depth of field results are very different.

    For example, I have a Panansonic FZ-20 (P&S) and a Canon 400D (DSLR).

    At x 12 optical zoom, the FZ-20 gives an equivalent focal length of approx 430mm.
    The 400D with 70-300mm zoom lens can also reach this same length because of the 1.6 crop factor that is part of the camera.

    Take the same picture with both cameras, and the "bokeh" (out of focus background) will be very different.

    For artistic purposes, the DSLR gives the ability to utilise this effect to better advantage.

    Having said that, there are times however, when I wish I could activate a button on my Canon so that it would take a picture just like the Panasonic would have. This normally applies to photos where I want everything in focus (ie Humungus depth of field ). My current knowledge of lens-attributes/aperture settings/shutter speeds does not allow this to be done as easily.

    I liken my DSLR camera to my cappucino machine. I can extract some really nice results........and I can make some absolute crap
    Last edited by Honest Gaza; 12-08-2006 at 02:46 PM.
    Canon 5D MKlll & Canon 50D
    Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM | Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM | Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM | Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro | Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM | Canon 50mm f/1.8 | Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 | Canon 430EX Flash | Lowepro Mini Trekker AW | Lowepro Toploader 65 AW | Lowepro Slingshot 200AW | Kata 3n1-10

    Panasonic Lumix FZ200
    Panasonic Lumix TZ7 (aka ZS3)
    Panasonic Lumix FT3 (aka TS3)

    Ali Baba.....the Thief of Bad Gags

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,770
    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Gaza View Post
    I liken my DSLR camera to my cappucino machine. I can extract some really nice results........and I can make some absolute crap
    Well, that just makes me want to
    .
    .
    .





    go dump the coffee I see sitting on my desk.

    lol
    Gear List:
    Some links I like: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    1,680
    ...take a photo of it....and try to enhance it with Photo Shop
    Canon 5D MKlll & Canon 50D
    Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM | Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM | Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM | Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro | Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM | Canon 50mm f/1.8 | Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 | Canon 430EX Flash | Lowepro Mini Trekker AW | Lowepro Toploader 65 AW | Lowepro Slingshot 200AW | Kata 3n1-10

    Panasonic Lumix FZ200
    Panasonic Lumix TZ7 (aka ZS3)
    Panasonic Lumix FT3 (aka TS3)

    Ali Baba.....the Thief of Bad Gags

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    1,680
    Gees...I'm only talking about the froth on the cappucino

    You foreign folk play funny games
    Canon 5D MKlll & Canon 50D
    Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM | Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM | Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM | Canon 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro | Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM | Canon 50mm f/1.8 | Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 | Canon 430EX Flash | Lowepro Mini Trekker AW | Lowepro Toploader 65 AW | Lowepro Slingshot 200AW | Kata 3n1-10

    Panasonic Lumix FZ200
    Panasonic Lumix TZ7 (aka ZS3)
    Panasonic Lumix FT3 (aka TS3)

    Ali Baba.....the Thief of Bad Gags

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3
    My reccomendation is to liken the digital camera to a film camera. If you were buying a film camera would you buy an SLR or a point and shoot? If you want professional quality shots go with the SLR, but if you want to record your vacation I would go with an ultra compact camera, the small size makes it much easier to cary since it fits in your pocket.

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