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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Posts
    2,143
    Quote Originally Posted by CamNovice View Post
    Anyway, just now I discovered that I actually shot them all in Night Mode. Good one, uh?!! I was playing with the camera outside before the game and forgot to change the setting when I went in - yes, what a ditz who has no business with such a camera!! As you can imagine, my "trial and error" will be multiplied many times over the norm!
    What, you think you are the only one? I took some really nice shots of my nephew, only to realize the white balcance was wrong and he looked like a smurf (I did not shoot these in RAW so I could not change the white balance in pp). By the time I looked after a few shots and saw this, the moment was gone.

    My wife was tired of me saying, I had all the settings right except
    the...

    Keep at it, it is a lot of fun. Do not get too frustrated.
    - Rich

    Nikon: D50, 18-70mm, 50mm, 70-200vr
    Kenko: 12mm, 20mm, 36mm Ext Tubes
    Manfrotto: 486RC2
    Benro: A-327 tripod


    My Flickr Photos Here

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,200
    The easy way to get the best shots possible with your lens will be to put the camera in Av mode and set the Aperture to the smallest number possible. This will give you the largest lens openning and the fastest shutter speed your camera will allow. You should also set your ISO to 400.

    If you still don't get the picture quality you want try upping the ISO to 800, then 1600.

    I shoot my nephew playing indoor roller hockey with a 70-200 f/2.8 and use ISO 1600 and f/2.8 to get the best results. Your rink may be better lit and you'll have better light reflection from white ice than I get from wood floors so you might get lucky not having to use as high an ISO.

    *You are going to enjoy reading Brian's book but for your situation its all about maximum shutter speed which will be achieved by setting your Ap as large as it can go and upping your ISO to as large a value as is necessary to get your results. Hopefully you'll be able to get the results you need w/o having to purchase a faster f/2.8 lens.
    _______________
    Nikon D3, D300, F-100, 10.5 Fisheye, 35 f/1.4, 50 f/1.4, 85 f/1.4, Zeiss 100 f/2, 105 f/2.5, 200 f/4 Micro, 200 f/2 VR, 300 f/2.8 AF-S II, 24-70 f/2.8, 70-200 f/2.8, SU-800, SB-900, 4xSB-800, 1.4x and 1.7x TC
    (2) Profoto Acute 2400 packs w/4 heads, Chimera Boxes

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,148
    Check this site often http://www.bythom.com/ for thom's new book to come out on the D80. I have his D70s book and it is very good. It will give you way more information on how your camera works than you can find anywhere else. This is not to replace other suggestions, because it is not a book on photography. It is a book on how to use photography principles with your specific model camera. Very good reading. It comes on a cd with a printable PDF file so that you can by license make a print version.

    While it is not intended to tell you how to take a photo, there is still plenty of information that will make your shots better because it will explain exactly how each of the "dummy" modes works, as well as exactly how the different focus modes, metering modes, etc. in your camera model work. Nikon needs to hire him for their manuals - or he needs to work out a royalties deal with them, that is my opinion.
    Nikon D70s
    Nikkor 50mm 1.8D (If you don't have it you need it)
    Nikkor 18-200mm VR II
    SB-600
    Bogen/Manfrotto Tripods/Heads
    NAS (D300, Nikkor 80-200mm (or 70-200mm)f/2.8, Tamron 90mm Macro)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    6
    Thanks so much for all the wonderful input! This is ever so helpful, to say the least. Thanks so much for the information about the book/CD coming out on the D80. I definitely would very much like to get a book on the D80 itself as I feel the manual, for me at least, just does not give enough info, and also a book on sports photography.

    Thanks so much to all - will keep you posted and with more questions I'm sure. Lots of practices and games coming up so lots of opportunities to experiment and learn. Even with pictures shot in night mode that were less than perfect to say the least , the kids loved seeing a slide show of them after the game.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Posts
    75
    I just got my D80 yesterday. As soon as the battery was charged I was off. I took about 45 pictures many of which turned out blurry. I had the camera in full auto. Once I read the book I realized that full auto defaults to dynamic auto focus. I changed to single mode (I think that is what it is called) and my problem was gone. In the photo below the horse's body and the fence post are in focus while the horses head is not. For some reason the dynamic mode went for the body and fence post and not the head. I should add that I think this was my problem and I would like to know if anyone has any input.

    I'm not trying to troubleshoot CamNovice's problem, I am quite the novice myself. Just sharing my experience. I was really into photography when I was younger. I got out my old 35mm yesterday to compare it to the D80. The old 35 had 1 mode; manual. The D80 has so many features I am sure it will take me a long time to get really good with it.

    Tony
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,148
    Autofocus is a combination of settings. I am not sure exactly what your settings were, but this looks like the often unpredictable results of one or two things... either "closest subject priority" - in which the camera saw the closest object with a lot of contrast... possibly the fencepost against the bright sky. If that is the case the body of the horse is close to that focal plane whereas the head is closer to the camera than the plane of focus. Your aperature setting could be changed to a bigger f-number (smaller aperature) to allow a deeper field of focus(not in auto mode though). --- or somewhat easier to predict instance that you had the focus indicator to the right of center selected and it focused on the body.

    If you could be more specific on what the AF settings are, it might help.
    Nikon D70s
    Nikkor 50mm 1.8D (If you don't have it you need it)
    Nikkor 18-200mm VR II
    SB-600
    Bogen/Manfrotto Tripods/Heads
    NAS (D300, Nikkor 80-200mm (or 70-200mm)f/2.8, Tamron 90mm Macro)

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    439
    Just like tcadwall said, your camera focused on either the post or the body and the horses face is closer to the camera so it is out of focus. Or the post and the body were the same distance and the horses face was closer, and maybe too close for the camera to focus on. Just try each of the focusing modes and see what you come up with.

    CamNovice, that is a bummer for shooting in Night mode. I was playing around on my teacher's D70 and switched the camera to Manual, and when my teacher went to go shoot some school pictures of ASB, they turned out all overexposed because she didn't know it was in "M" mode. Also to keep in mind, though you aren't shooting in Manual ("M") mode, to check your ISO. I went on a trip to Arizona, and me being very ignorant with my camera, I shot in ISO1600 in broad daylight. I got mixed up with what ISO actually meant. And in result of my action, all my photos have noise in them.
    Nikon D300
    Nikkor AF-S 17-55mm f/2.8
    Nikkor 80-200 f/2.8 AF-D (70-200mm f/2.8 VR soon)
    Nikon SB600 (SB800 soon)
    Nikon MB-D10 grip
    Sekonic L-358
    Bogan/Manfrotto 055xprob tripod

    Canon AE-1 Program
    Canon FD 50mm f/1.8
    CPC 2x Teleconverter
    CPC Phase 2 CCT 80-200 f/4.5
    CPC Phase 2 CCT 28mm Macro f/2.8

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    3,650
    Quote Originally Posted by rawpaw18 View Post
    It is a Christmas present for me, I have not been allowed to even look at it yet. 22 more days and counting til Christmas wth Bryan Peterson.
    I really can't say enough good things about this book... sorry you have to wait till the holiday. You'll find it a very good read
    I thought about who I am... and realized I was an
    unformed, unreconciled imagery, without "GOD"


    NikonD?
    and some other Nikon stuff

    0.0%

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Maryland's Eastern Shore
    Posts
    2,143
    XaiLo... sorry you have to wait till the holiday

    Oh that is fine with me, I can play with my latest toys the SB800 and the
    70-200vr. Presents for myself.
    - Rich

    Nikon: D50, 18-70mm, 50mm, 70-200vr
    Kenko: 12mm, 20mm, 36mm Ext Tubes
    Manfrotto: 486RC2
    Benro: A-327 tripod


    My Flickr Photos Here

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Wilkes Barre PA
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by CamNovice View Post
    Okay, I admit it - I am in way over my head! We are a point and shoot family with hockey kids. We wanted a camera with which we can get good hockey shots. Just pulled the D80 out of the box today and I realize we have a whole heap of reading and learning to do. I've been experimenting a bit tonight just with the sticks in the house, etc. and all the action shots are blurred. I'm wondering if someone could give me a brief summary of the general settings I will need to give me clear action shots just to get me started. I am overwhelmed at the moment reading the manual and really not knowing where to begin. I have it set on sports mode and AF-A. I think it needs to be on AF-C. I am going to go back and experiment with that. If someone could just give me the basic settings that should work for sports shots, that would help get me started and and perhaps feel a bit of success and thus develop a smidgen of self confidence that I in fact can do this!

    Also, any recommendations for a book or online class regarding the D80 or DSLRs in general and especially with any emphasis on sports photography? Such recommendations would also be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks much!
    try this
    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26592
    he explains it in plain English and i think this would help you as well

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