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  1. #1
    squirrel Guest

    Budget (~$200-$400) camera

    Hello everyone,

    I am looking for a replacement camera. I'm not from America so camera prices are higher here. I'll post prices of what we have here, but you'll notice it is warped.

    Size doesn't really matter, but it can't be _too_ big since my mom will be using it. I will mainly use the camera for taking snaps of bands at shows, where the light is obviously not too good. I will not be printing out anything, just looking at them on the computer.

    Here is what I'm able to get my hands on:

    Kodak C330 + 512MB SD Card + Bag - $184
    Kodak EasyShare C533 - $203
    HP Photosmart M525 - $206
    Olympus FE-170 - $214
    Olympus FE-115 - $221
    Fujifilm A700 - $238
    Kodak EasyShare C360 - $242
    Kodak EasyShare Z 700 - $247
    HP Photosmart M527 - $263
    Olympus SP-320 + 128MB card - $271
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ3 - $277
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-LS2 - $277
    Canon PowerShot A530 - $278
    Canon PowerShot A540 - $328
    Kodak Z700 Digital Camera + Printer Dock - $330
    HP Photosmart R727 - $336
    Sony DSC-W30 - $342
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ5 - $350
    Casio EX-Z60 - $357
    Fujifilm S5600 - $359
    Sony DSC W50B - $360
    HP Photosmart R827 - $516
    Fujifilm V10 - $385
    Fujifilm F650 - $385
    HP Photosmart R927 - $390
    Fujifilm F20 - $398
    Olympus U700 + 256MB Card - $406
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ2 - $425
    Olympus SP510 - $428
    Kodak Z612 - $442

    I'd have to convince my mom on the higher prices. So far I've been recommended the Panasonic LZ5 and Olympus SP 510 UZ

    Thanks
    Last edited by squirrel; 02-17-2007 at 04:31 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    207
    Very nice, thorough job in compiling your list!

    To me, the camera that stands out is the Fuji S5600. It is certainly the best camera of the bunch when it comes to shooting in low-light venues, and has plenty of manual controls for when you wish to advance your photographic skills.
    CATS! & a few other things... http://catographer.smugmug.com

    Fuji S6000fd

  3. #3
    squirrel Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by flippedgazelle View Post
    Very nice, thorough job in compiling your list!

    To me, the camera that stands out is the Fuji S5600. It is certainly the best camera of the bunch when it comes to shooting in low-light venues, and has plenty of manual controls for when you wish to advance your photographic skills.
    Definitely looks like an option, but the only problem is the lens is huge and my mom will be using the camera now and then and she won't want to lug it around! What are your thoughts on the Panasonic LZ5?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Los Altos, CA
    Posts
    2,635

    Did you consider the Panasonic TZ1?

    Quote Originally Posted by squirrel View Post
    Definitely looks like an option, but the only problem is the lens is huge and my mom will be using the camera now and then and she won't want to lug it around! What are your thoughts on the Panasonic LZ5?
    It's NOT so huge, has a 10X (35-350 equiv.) zoom lens. I'm sure your Mom could carry it in her purse, as I've carried it into a concert in the front pocket of my 501 Levis. I've already shown these here, but will repeat some concert photos I took with it at ISO 400, handheld:





    Those two were taken at full zoom; this one was taken at ~60mm equivalent:



    Shutterspeeds for those three shots were 1/30, 1/50, and 1/15 second, respectively.
    Let a be your umbrella!

  5. #5
    squirrel Guest
    The Panasonic TZ1 is too expensive. I'm going to speak to my mom tomorrow and see what the absolute maximum she is willing to put in, and if she cares about the size, etc.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    516
    You're biggest criteria needs to make sure the camera is equiped with Image stabilization (OIS, IS, VR, etc). This is one of the greatest pieces of equipment ALL cameras should be equiped with. With all the cameras out there in that camera price range, make sure the one you pick has this option.

    Other than that, debate on battery life and type. My sony point n' shoot has crappy battery life and it has propietary battery, same as my nikon. But the Nikon DSLR battery lasts FOREVER and a half. So it really depends. My old Fuji took AAs and would kill a set of batteries if I worked it all day. So I bought 2 sets of rechargables and this setup worked good. Then sometimes I'd need batteries, so I would run across the street and get some AAs. Something to think about.

    SD cards and CF are common and relatively cheap.
    Small Town Newspaper Oaf

    East Coast Coorespondant for CRAWL Magazine!!??

  7. #7
    squirrel Guest
    So I've narrowed it down to 3, Fujifilm FinePix S6000fd, Olympus SP-510 UZ and the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ5

    http://www2.dpreview.com/reviews/com...mclz5&show=all

    Thoughts?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    207
    LR, why do you say that IS is the "biggest criteria"? It is, granted, one feature to consider, but there are so many more factors to a camera's ultimate mission - allow the user to create good photos.

    Squirrel, are you sure the Fuji S6000fd made your list? It is a considerably more expensive camera than anything else you have mentioned. It is also the largest and most capable of the 3 you linked to, although the Auto mode reportedly does a poor job with indoor shots, in terms of over-boosted ISO. This may not matter to you if you learn the manual controls a little bit (mainly selected the appropriate ISO), but it might matter to your mom, unless she learns a bit, also.

    Or perhaps I am wrong about the Auto mode, but I have read negative things about it. I've never used it, myself.
    CATS! & a few other things... http://catographer.smugmug.com

    Fuji S6000fd

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    516
    why do you say that IS is the "biggest criteria"?
    I say this because for a DSLR, one can simply increase the ISO without fear of too much noise or change lenses accompany a better apeture.

    In a fixed lense camera, you got what you've got. With IS you are good to go down to ~1/8th shutter speed. I used to run one of those SLR-like cameras and having IS would have been the shit.

    While out and about, people have always asked me, "Here, take my picture with my camera". So I gladly comply. Canons, Fujis, Sonys, etc, they all have their high points. Main thing is to handle the camera first and see if you like it. Sometimes I'll pick up a camera and instantly like it, other times not.

    Go find the one that feels right to you. But that IS is a must for all cameras these days. An excellent tool to have.
    Small Town Newspaper Oaf

    East Coast Coorespondant for CRAWL Magazine!!??

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    207
    I agree, IS is a great tool, but is clearly not a "must". I take quite a few indoor photos with moving subjects, and IS does nothing in those situations. The ability of the Fuji S6000fd to capture usable images at higher ISO (thus helping out with both camera shake and subject movement) is more useful to me than IS. Naturally, I wish my camera had IS, but, given the choice, high ISO is ultimately more useful - at least for me.
    CATS! & a few other things... http://catographer.smugmug.com

    Fuji S6000fd

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