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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Illinois
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    300
    Yes but Don, the Sony A100 is not a professional dslr. I think it's more comparable to the XTi. Besides, many will point out the image stabalization of a Sony isn't as good as lens IS. Such things as composing a shot are different with in-camera stabalization.

    For the prosumer market, your advice is great. The Sony A100 with it's IS is better than no IS but I feel it's useless to compare it to a Canon IS setup. Sony hasn't yet made a camera with in-body IS that is comparable to a pro camera. Until they do, professionals will choose Canon (or Nikon).

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Thumbs up No argument here, my friend

    Hey, I'm in complete agreement with you on this point. My proposal of the "A99" was an attempt to point this out. Based on the proposed Minolta 9D-prototype, the "A99" would compete toe-to-toe with the likes of the Canon EOS 1Ds MkII or EOS 1D MkII.

    Will SONY deliver on the Minolta-promise? Gosh, I would hope so ... otherwise sell the prototype to someone who will. We're all waiting.

    EDIT: (3/1/2007) The SONY "Flagship" is currently in the works and will be a pro-level model, perhaps even full-frame. Canon collectively gasps.

    Take a look!

    Name:  Flagship_Model.jpg
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    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-06-2007 at 07:00 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    4

    Tamron lenses

    This topic has been very helpful for me. I'm curious if someone has any thoughts/suggestions on these two lenses. I have had them since my Minolta Maxxum XTsi days (so they have some age), but I bought the Sony since they would work with it, and at a very minimum, get me started.

    The two lenses are:

    Tamron AF 28-105mm 1:4-5.6
    Tamron AF LD 70-300mm tele-macro(1:3.9) 1:4-5.6

    Any thoughts/info would be greatly appreciated. This has all helped already.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Des Plaines, IL
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    Red face I hope this helps in your thinking ...

    Quote Originally Posted by rengstrom View Post
    This topic has been very helpful for me. I'm curious if someone has any thoughts/suggestions on these two lenses. I have had them since my Minolta Maxxum XTsi days (so they have some age), but I bought the Sony since they would work with it, and at a very minimum, get me started.

    The two lenses are:

    Tamron AF 28-105mm 1:4-5.6
    Tamron AF LD 70-300mm tele-macro(1:3.9) 1:4-5.6

    Any thoughts/info would be greatly appreciated. This has all helped already.
    While these AF lenses will work with the SONY, I believe you will note that they are rather slow in autofocus. Your image clarity may also suffer, because digital lenses and film lenses are a little different, in the way the image is presented to the two different media (Sensor vs film). As a "starting point", they may be fine, but you get shooting, will soon notice (as others have) that you will want more out of the lenses or they are simply not performing to your ... expectations.

    Comparison: The best idea I've been able to come up with concerning the quality difference between digital lenses and film lenses is to simply see it for yourself. This does two things:
    1. You can reset your expectations of your existing lensing for future photographs
    2. You get a great chance to explore methods of improving your shots through upgrading your glass ... or if a glass-upgrade is even warranted. (You may be happy with what you are getting )


    If you can get to the camera store, that carries TAMRON lenses, take your older lenses in and do a side-by-side shoot with comparible lenses.

    The TAMRON AF28-105 f/4-5.6 might be best replaced by the TAMRON SP AF17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di-II LD Aspherical (IF). With the SONY's 1.5x digital cropping factor (DCF), the 17-50mm becomes effectively 28-75mm. That's usually plenty for walking around. You still get your wide angle and good range.

    The TAMRON AF70-300 f/4-5.6 LD might best be replaced by the new TAMRON SP AF70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD (IF) due out this year. It's not quite ready for distribution, yet ... so in the meantime, you may want to consider the SIGMA APO 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG MACRO HSM. Once again, with the SONY 1.5x DCF, your lens effectively becomes 105-300mm.

    • The first thing you'll notice with the new glass is the speed of focal lock you will enjoy.
    • The second is the much sharper overall image you'll have.
    • Finally, with f/2.8 lenses on your camera, your low-light capability with the in-body IS will be rather impressive.


    Noteworthy: f/4-5.6 zooms tend to suffer indoors, without an external flash or more (studio lighting, etc), due to shutter-speed constraints. The in-body IS of the A100 will forgive some of this, if you steady-up a bit, but f/2.8 is the real solution - or at the very least, a tripod.

    The costs involved in the upgrade-glass is quite nominal (almost 1/2 the cost) compared to what it would cost to do it with Canon-glass.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-08-2007 at 01:09 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    4
    Thanks for the help! I've noticed some slow AF speeds with the lenses, so you're spot on with that. I'll probably drop by the local camera shop with the old lenses and use them as credit towards a new set.

    Thanks again, I appreciate the feedback!

    Rob

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Lightbulb another thought ...

    If you are looking to trade into a reasonable one-lens-solution, check out the TAMRON AF 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di-II LD Ashperical (IF). It is a good overall lens, that will reduce your need to lens swap and provide reasonably wide aperture up to about 60mm. After that, you will probably require flash, for indoor use.

    The speed of focus is pretty good and it covers the widest focal range of any lens out there. It may just be the best "utility" lens out there.

    Here's some information on it (Click here->) 18-250mm
    or if you have Adobe Reader, click on this PDF
    Last edited by DonSchap; 02-24-2007 at 05:14 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554

    Question Can you really have it all ... with only the manufacturer?

    Well, in the recent year, I have been busily putting together a system that should provide "the basics." And while this doesn't include every lens you can imagine, it does cover a number of bases.

    To be realistic, though, a lot of people start off with one major lens and then eventually pick up a "better" lens later on. It was what I personally did with my Canon EOS 20D system.

    When considering the SONY, I had no idea that SONY would be so highly-priced with their glass. I had hoped for some reasonable level, but as long as people will pay these ghastly prices, we are stuck with them. Third-party glass seems even more reasonable than before and hopefully, as the demand increases ... the prices might drop in order for the SONY lenses in order to sell the "rebadged" goodies they got from Minolta. The lenses are already two-years old and they are not getting any younger.

    Guess the wait begins. C'mon SONY, let's sell some glass!

    EDIT: Well, prayers eventually get answered, I guess. The SONY 70-200mm f/2.8 G dropped in price by $400 and B&H Photo has it for $1899. Still not great, but definitely moving in the correct direction.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-08-2007 at 01:12 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    155
    That's a great travel lens that covers all ranges. It would simply replace my kit lens (17-80), beer can (70-210) but at the expense of some quality.

    One thing I want to explore more of is indoor photography and 'bokeh.' As such, the Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 looks appealing. I have no idea what other lens might be recommended at that wide-angle/aperture. Additional thoughts?
    Best of Both worlds:
    dSLR: Sony a100 dSLR w/ kit lens (18-70mm)
    Minolta Lens Collection: 28-80mm xi, 70-210mm
    Point and Shoot: Sony DSC-T11

    My photo portfolio

    My Flickr

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
    Posts
    9,554

    Lightbulb Some others around

    Quote Originally Posted by cgl88 View Post
    That's a great travel lens that covers all ranges. It would simply replace my kit lens (17-80), beer can (70-210) but at the expense of some quality.

    One thing I want to explore more of is indoor photography and 'bokeh.' As such, the Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 looks appealing. I have no idea what other lens might be recommended at that wide-angle/aperture. Additional thoughts?
    Well, I'm not big on SIGMA, but their new AF 18-50mm f/2.8 MACRO has some merit to it. If you can find one, give 'er a look-see. For some reason, Tokina and SONY are NOT linking up. The Tokina AT-X 165 PRO DX 16-50mm f/2.8 and AT-X 535 PRO DX AF 50-135mm f/2.8 are only being made with the Canon-EOS or Nikon-D mounts.
    Last edited by DonSchap; 10-08-2007 at 01:16 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    155
    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap View Post
    Well, I'm not big on SIGMA, but their new AF 18-50mm f/2.8 MACRO has some merit to it. If you can find one, give 'er a look-see. For some reason, Tokina and SONY are NOT linking up. The Tokina AFX 16-50mm f/2.8 is only being made with the Canon or Nikon mount.
    dpreview has a good discussion on minolta lenses:
    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...2&q=flash&qf=m

    I don't like Tokina. I had bad experience with one of their zoom lenses (70-210). I'll look into the sigma, though.

    I don't want to spend more than $500 cdn for an f/2.8 lens.
    Best of Both worlds:
    dSLR: Sony a100 dSLR w/ kit lens (18-70mm)
    Minolta Lens Collection: 28-80mm xi, 70-210mm
    Point and Shoot: Sony DSC-T11

    My photo portfolio

    My Flickr

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