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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    30

    Thinking of upgrading to a d200

    and was wondering if anyone has any info on it. I am just in the beginning stages of starting my own business(natural light, often low light of children and families mostly) and have a d50(hence my feeling the need to upgrade). A good friend of mine is a pro and has a successful business is pushing me to get a canon(she has a mark 2, I don't have that kind of money) plus I dont' want to have to reinvest in new lens' too! Just want a camera that will grow with me as I feel like I have "outgrown" the d50. Anythoughts would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,929
    I myself have started my own business and plan on upgrading to the D200 or whatever the new model is at that time. At this point in time, I dont need to upgrade as the D50 does everything I need it to, and the customers are very pleased. Just curious, why do you feel the "need" to upgrade? I know you said you feel youve outgrown it, how? Is there something you are missing that you wish you had? Is the quality of pictures not acceptable to you? What are the main reasons you feel the need to upgrade at this point? My suggestion would be to invest money in the best possible Nikon lenses you can get and wait til your business takes off and allows you to get the more expensive bodies. Also put some money into marketing/advertising!!! The D50 is quite capable.

    For you to change to Canon now would be very foolish to say the least.
    Jason

    "A coward dies a thousand deaths, a soldier dies but once."-2Pac


    A bunch of Nikon stuff!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    City of Lights, City of Casinos, City of Sin -- Must be Las Vegas!
    Posts
    1,512
    I started out with the D50 and upgraded to the D200. My main reason--speed. To me, the additional megapixels of the D200 are also an added bonus not to mention that the D200 itself is better built and has a better feel to me than the D50/D80.
    Canon G10 - Nikon D3 - Sony P&S - Flickr Account - Non-updated Website

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia area
    Posts
    16
    If you need more megapixels for large poster size images go ahead and get something better ( more expensive) but I find that my d50 is quite good for my needs. I'd rather put any spare cash into better lenses. What do you need this "better" camera to do that the d50 will not ?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,200
    You'd probably be better off buying a fast top quality prime lens than a D200 body for that type of photography unless as has been stated, you are going to be printing really large.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,148
    I could think of a lot of reasons that the d200 would be a worthy upgrade. I would be at more of a loss to reason the D2Xs over the d200 but that is just me. I think we all are at different places, and I am considering a d200 upgrade (as I have recently mentioned) for my D70s. I consider the D70s to have many real advantages over the D50 - and that choice was a no-brainer for me.

    While I agree that glass is important(especially in low-light), one might easily identify other needs as well.

    1) D50 is disadvantaged in lighting capabilities (you need to purchase a controller or SB-800 to use Creative Lighting)
    2) Manual settings are easier/quicker with the extra wheel (d70(s) and d200)
    3) Speed
    4) Buffer
    5) Wireless Network capability with WT-3 (D200)
    6) more res. (D200)
    7) magnesium sealed body (D200)
    8) more focus points (D200)
    9) better AF (D200) and metering

    The D80 is also not a bad option as a tweener - from what I can tell.

    Timing is everything, and I might not be able to make the upgrade a fiscally responsible decision for a little while... but I do see plenty of reasons for it over my D70s.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,205
    Quote Originally Posted by tcadwall View Post
    I could think of a lot of reasons that the d200 would be a worthy upgrade. I would be at more of a loss to reason the D2Xs over the d200 but that is just me. I think we all are at different places, and I am considering a d200 upgrade (as I have recently mentioned) for my D70s. I consider the D70s to have many real advantages over the D50 - and that choice was a no-brainer for me.

    While I agree that glass is important(especially in low-light), one might easily identify other needs as well.

    1) D50 is disadvantaged in lighting capabilities (you need to purchase a controller or SB-800 to use Creative Lighting)
    2) Manual settings are easier/quicker with the extra wheel (d70(s) and d200)
    3) Speed
    4) Buffer
    5) Wireless Network capability with WT-3 (D200)
    6) more res. (D200)
    7) magnesium sealed body (D200)
    8) more focus points (D200)
    9) better AF (D200) and metering

    The D80 is also not a bad option as a tweener - from what I can tell.

    Timing is everything, and I might not be able to make the upgrade a fiscally responsible decision for a little while... but I do see plenty of reasons for it over my D70s.
    Mr. T Cadwall I am in the same position as you. I have saved up enough money over the last month of weddings to finally purchase a D200, although the Nikor 70-200 f/2.8 VRII is awefully tempting. I had an experience at my last wedding...my D70s started blinking --FEE, and after a 2 minute scare of my life, I was able to fix the problem by fidgeting with the lens mount. Bottom line, for me having the D200 as my main axe and the D70s (going in for service) as my backup is very important... moreso than that Nikkor 70-200 f/s.8 which I can buy after 2-3 more weddings this month.

    Another interesting point...even though it doesnt matter at all, because you can get awesome results with a D50 or D200...but people do take you more serious as a photographer when you show up with a D200 + MB200 than a D50...just my observation. Some people might start to question a photographer when they show up with mid-grade camera and this can lead to client suspicion of your said photographic skills.Although, even with all this great gear.. you can still make suckarse images if you dont know what the heck your doing.

    There is no question that the speed and build quality of the D200, especially the VF, is worth the upgrade if you already have your mind set on it and have the cashe to do so. Good luck with your decision, and happy shooting.
    Last edited by Esoterra; 10-11-2006 at 01:21 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,929
    Quote Originally Posted by Esoterra View Post
    Another interesting point...even though it doesnt matter at all, because you can get awesome results with a D50 or D200...but people do take you more serious as a photographer when you show up with a D200 + MB200 than a D50...just my observation. Some people might start to question a photographer when they show up with mid-grade camera and this can lead to client suspicion of your said photographic skills.
    Its been my findings that most of the people I have shot for couldnt identify the D50 from a D200 just by looking at it(unless they read the label). If someone wanted to question someones photographic skills because they have a D50 as apposed to a D200, I would just show them my results and that would shut them right up. There is no question the D200 is a better camera but for people just starting out with a business, there are better areas to invest the money up front.
    Jason

    "A coward dies a thousand deaths, a soldier dies but once."-2Pac


    A bunch of Nikon stuff!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    30
    Thanks so much for your input everyone! Greatly appreciated!

    I have to also refer to the experience my friend shared, when she was first starting her photog biz, and had an entry level SLR, she met with a client and he looked at her camera, told her he had the exact same one at home, why would he pay her to take photos of his family. That story frightens the bejeebers out of me, in an industry where referrals are the best form of advertisement, I can't afford to have that happen! And with the d50 camera being so affordable these days, I can see it being a liklihood! Although, I agree, you have to have the eye for it, IN ADDITION TO having a great camera...

    just food for thought.

    Again thank you everyone for your candid responses. And please continue if there is anyone else iwth info on the d200!!

    Ideally I want more consistenly tack sharp photos, which I know will come with experience. With the frequent low light situations I shoot in, it seems inevitable(I generally always keep the 50mm 1.8 on), also the wiggly subjects contribute too. I have heard the d200 is much faster(I'm assuming good for sports), would this not also help my situation?
    Patti.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,148
    Patti,

    I think you really summed it up well. I agree with you that if a client has a D50 and let's face it, if you are looking at DSLR's right now it is NOT mid-level, it is entry-level. (trying to avoid flames, I agree that it is a capable camera, don't get defensive) However, the D50 is a very popular camera, as is the Rebel XT. I think that with either of those cameras your chances of that experience happening are pretty good.

    Also, almost every family has an 'uncle' that fiddles in photography. He WILL pick it out, and likely might comment to someone.

    I have seen good photographers with mid-grade equipment set them up for a special shot (with a special lens for instance), that way they don't miss the moment trying to switch lenses. Then it looks ok... Cause you are shooting with multiple cameras, and a big specialty lens on one of them.

    HOWEVER, I think you must realize that you are decribing a situation in which you need fast lenses. Fast cameras are not the same as fast lenses. A fast camera might take a great sequence of shots, or have the ability to bracket an important shot, etc. But a fast lens will stop the action. A VR lens will help you hand-hold a shot in lower lighting, but it won't stop your subject in low lighting, for THAT you need a fast lens - regardless of body.

    Might want to consider the fast lens, and then the D200. After all, if that is the choice, the end-result IS going to be better in low light if you have a fast lens. AND I must agree that the end-result (sample work, product, etc) is more important that someone recognizing your body. (hehehe that sounds kewl)

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