Home News Buyers Guide About Advertising
 
 
 
   
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    129

    Linear Polarizer vs Circular Polarizer: What's the diff?

    Hi, could you shed some light on what the difference is between Linear and Circular Polarizers? I've read the manufactures stated difference (i.e. circular = auto focus cams, linear = manual focus cams) but that really doesn't help much. Would one (or more) of you be able to provide a little more understandable/useful explanation?

    As always, your help is much appreciated.
    My Family's website

    Panasonic DMC-FZ20 - and loving every minute of it!!!
    Canon s60 - keeps the wife from using MY FZ20 :P

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    western pa
    Posts
    2,334
    Copied from Luminous-Landscape

    There are two types of polarizing filters available linear or circular. Linear polarizers are more effective and less expensive than circular ones. But circular polarizers are needed with just about any camera that has a through-the-lens metering system, or autofocus.

    The reason for this is that both of these systems use semi-silvered mirrors to siphon off some of the light coming though the lens. If that light is linearly polarized it renders either the metering or the autofocus ineffective. This means that you're going to have to buy circular polarizers unless you're shooting with a pre-1970's camera, or a view camera.


    The FZ series cameras work just fine with a linear polarizer
    .






    Gene
    http://grc225.zenfolio.com/
    http://imageevent.com/grc6
    one of these days I'll understand!

    Panasonic FZ20 & FZ30,FZ18
    D50 -- D80

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    129
    Would you or anyone have sample pics of what a linear polarizer looks like in comparision to a circular one - pics of scenary, not the filters themselves of course

    From my additional searching, it seems that Circular is mainly for high ends digitals; though they also say, when in doubt, get circular.

    Thanks for the info Genece, much appreciated.
    My Family's website

    Panasonic DMC-FZ20 - and loving every minute of it!!!
    Canon s60 - keeps the wife from using MY FZ20 :P

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    87
    Funny thing is, I bought a UV filter on ebay for protection and it came WITH a Circular Polarizer. Sold as a set.

    Didn't know that I'd gotten something good until I started reading up on what it could do

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    9

    Still puzzle?

    Hi Genece,

    Do you mean that Circular Polarizer lens doesn't work with FZ20 or because Linear Polarizer lens is cheaper that why you suggest the Linear instead of the Circular?

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    western pa
    Posts
    2,334
    Just cheaper thats all... either works just fine.
    I have a 55mm circular for my FZ10 and a 62 mm linear on the FZ20.
    .






    Gene
    http://grc225.zenfolio.com/
    http://imageevent.com/grc6
    one of these days I'll understand!

    Panasonic FZ20 & FZ30,FZ18
    D50 -- D80

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    121
    Quote Originally Posted by genece
    Just cheaper thats all... either works just fine.
    I have a 55mm circular for my FZ10 and a 62 mm linear on the FZ20.

    Well, I am not an expert in this field or anything but I figured I'd throw in my 2cents anyhow...

    I have been reading up a bit on polarizers 'cuz I want to get one very soon. I have read a few posts that say there is only a small difference in the quality you get with linear vs circular (but I have read the opposite as well, so who knows which is true??). But one thing that made me reconsider getting the linear was this: if I choose to upgrade at some point and get a different cam, I might not be able to use the linear polarizer on it. Then I need a new one. Maybe not a big deal to some, but worth considering.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    346

    Lightbulb

    A circular polarizing filter is for use with all cameras with beam splitters in the light paths of their TTL exposure meter and with autofocus lenses.

    A Linear polarization filter is for SLRs and rangefinder cameras without beam splitters in their light paths.

    Circular polarization has the same pictorial effect as linear polarization, but allows for proper exposure metering and/or autofocus distance settings.

    Polarizers are multi-talented
    Experienced photographers consider po-larizing filters to be the most important filters. Their ability to reduce or eliminate reflections is probably their best-known feature, but it is not the only one. They enhance the color purity of the subject (increased color saturation) by blocking the blue veil of light from the sky, They increase the contrast in black-and-white photographs, reduce haze, and make white clouds stand out dramatically from an intensely blue sky. When the filter is rotated by 90 from its normal reflection-reducing position, it can even appear to increase the relative intensity of reflec-tions on water, glass, lacquer and plastic materials up to a factor of 2.
    B&W Filter Handbook

    With polarizing filters, reflections on glass, lacquer, on nearly all plastic materials and other electrically non-conducting surfaces can often be reduced or even eliminated. Polarizing Filters provide you the control over how much reflection you wish to remain because the light reflected at an angle of about 40 to 70 by these surfaces is strongly polarized. Its transmission can be reduced, blocked or even enhanced! In relation to the re-maining unpolarized light, depending on the rota-tion of the filter. Thus a clear view is made possible through plates of glass, of goldfish below the sur-face of the water, or of writing or pictures behind a glossy layer of lacquer.
    Every object outdoors reflects light from the sky more or less diffusely and largely polarized, some objects, such as green plants and red roof tiles are covered by a bluish-gray veil that can make them appear pale and dirty. Polarizing Filters can remove this polarized veil and thus increase the saturation of the true color. Because the blue light from the sky, especially at an angle approximately perpendicular to the sun is strongly polarized, a polarizing filter can be used to render the sky with a more saturated color, so that white clouds will stand out more dramatically.
    B&W Filter Handbook
    Olympus E-3 | Olympus E-1 | Olympus 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 | Olympus 50mm f2.0 Macro | Olympus 50-200mm f2.8-3.5 | Olympus FL-50R Flash

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    9

    Talking

    Thanks for everyone's 2cents. I always think that Panasonic should give you guys commission. I almost bought a Canon D300 when I was going to replace my Canon A75. Just before I placed order, I found this Forums and I bought my Panasonic FZ20 2 weeks ago. I believe a lot of people did the same thing too. I still explorering my FZ20 and hopefully with you guys help I will become an expert of my new camera.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    346
    Everyone must remember that the best way is to see if any camera suits your requirements, then get your hands on one for a trial, at the end of the day it is you that has to use the camera not us
    Olympus E-3 | Olympus E-1 | Olympus 14-54mm f2.8-3.5 | Olympus 50mm f2.0 Macro | Olympus 50-200mm f2.8-3.5 | Olympus FL-50R Flash

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •