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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    33

    Olympus E-500 anyone? Seriously, anyone?

    There isn't much in the Olympus digital forum on this camera. Does anyone here have experience with it - specifically the two lens kit? (general quality, etc.). Am I getting substandard lenses relative to an ultrazoom by getting this package?

    Per my earlier post, I'm torn between the ultrazoom and the "entry level" dSLR. This one comes with a two lenses at a comparable price to the Canon Rebel and the Nikon D50.

    Size doesn't matter to me. I have a compact digital with 3x zoom but only 3.2mp. I want something that will give me greater zoom for the outdoors (kids, nature) and good pics indoors (< 20 feet).

    I've scoured the reviews and posts here for many many hours. Like a recent poster, I see mostly great pics but my guess is the photographer has as much to do with that as the camera. I wouldn't put myself in that category.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by sully; 08-21-2006 at 08:44 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    367
    Well, if you feel like you're wanting to grow as a photographer and not just take casual snapshots of whatever till the day you die i'd highly recomend going ahead and purchasing a dslr. I was one who compromised and settled for an ultrazoom and although it is a great camera and would suit nearly anyone who wanted great casual shots i found it just gave me the digital photobug and i wasn't satisfied with it until i purchased a dslr. Now that i HAVE a dslr i understand why they cost so much more. If you are torn between an ultrazoom and a dslr... get the dslr you won't regret it. Because when you start using your ultrazoom all you'll think about is how much better a dslr would have been. Now if all you've ever wanted was a point and shoot, by all means, grab an ultrazoom. Almost all dslr's have a point and shoot mode. Fully automatic exposure adjustment, flash usage, iso setting, it does it all for you if you turn it to little green box mode yet you still have all your creative zone modes for when you desire a certain effect and start growing in your ability and knowledge. So good luck. Also, don't skimp on glass. The lens is what the camera sees through so if you have to, spend more on your lens than your camera. I'd rather have a 6 megapixel used digital rebel with L series glass (or something pretty darn close) than a 5d with a crappy lens. Of course i'm speaking in canon terms because that's what i'm most familiar with. I know each lens manufacturer has their "kickass" line of lenses so i'd recomend going with that even if it's sigma EX or w/e tamrons is or w/e the case may be. Get the best you can reasonably afford.

    Hah, i just reread your original post and realized i didn't answer your question. The olympus is a great deal. Oly uses good sensors and they have pretty decent glass. As an entry level option it's a good for considering what you get for the price. Any dslr will blow an ultrazoom out of the water in regards to image quality, ESPECIALLY at higher iso's (lower light, faster motion, etc etc.) The oly e-500 doesn't do higher iso's (800 and 1600) as well as some of the other dslr options out there but like i said... buy the best you can reasonably afford. It'll still beat the snot out of an ultrazoom. So yeah, if that's what you think will serve you best, get it. I'm a canon fan myself (rebel xt, 20d, 30d, etc) primarily for higher iso performance (1600 is great and 3200 is very usable if you use it correctly)but that goes back to film so i just stuck with the canon system and luckily it turns out they are an excellent digital system. So yeah, go shoot with one at a store and see what you think. That's the only way to know if you'll really like it. I mean i've pitched rebel xt's to people explaining to them it's the best camera in the world for the money and i get "meh, it's uncomfortable to hold, anything else?" So different people have different requirements from a camera. Buy what suits you best.
    Last edited by BonjiB; 08-21-2006 at 02:34 PM.
    The name is pronounced bonn-gee-bee
    Canon 1Ds Mark II
    Canon 20D + BG-E2
    Canon Elan 7e
    Canon 70-200 f/2.8L USM IS
    Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di II LD Aspherical [IF]
    Canon 50mm f/1.8
    Canon 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 USM
    Canon 135mm f/2.8 Soft Focus

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    33
    Thanks Bonji for your response. What you just said is what I've been feeling. I'm trying to justify the additional cost by telling myself it will last a long time! I still have an old Canon A1 film camera that I loved until we went digital (cheap) with the Canon P&S that my wife could use. I have had great experience with the few Canon products. But again everyone has their limits on what they want/can spend and I would really like zoom capability up front. My thoughts are the Rebel with a decent lens would set me back close to $1,000 USD but I'm not familiar enough with the lens side of things to know that for sure.

    Getting down to the guts of the matter I want a 6+ MP camera with 300mm+ of zoom that will perform well both in and out for less than $800. I don't think the beast exists!
    Last edited by sully; 08-21-2006 at 04:13 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    33
    After researching for my above criteria, I don't think it exists.

    So does it make sense to buy a large MP count p&s camera with a moderate 3-4x zoom and then crop in on the computer for more zoom? I guess this would be like digital zoom???

    Any help appreciated.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    33
    After researching for my above criteria, I don't think it exists.

    So does it make sense to buy a large MP count p&s camera with a moderate 3-4x zoom and then crop in on the computer for more zoom? I guess this would be like digital zoom???

    Any help appreciated.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by sully
    After researching for my above criteria, I don't think it exists.

    So does it make sense to buy a large MP count p&s camera with a moderate 3-4x zoom and then crop in on the computer for more zoom? I guess this would be like digital zoom???

    Any help appreciated.
    If you are serious about photography then there are a lot of good dSLRs around. I have three questions for you:
    1. How big (physical size) do you want it to be? Large, small, medium.
    2. How much do you want to spend?
    3. Do you want AA batteries or will you use manufacturer's special batteries?

    AA batteries - these are used by the Pentax dSLRs and by the Fuji S3 Pro. All the others need an adaptor (where available) to use AA batteries.

    The cheapest dSLR is the Pentax at the moment.

    The smallest dSLRs are the Canon XT, Pentax dSLRs and the Olympus.

    Canon blows all of the other cameras away in the high-iso range. It's just that much better.

    Remember though that while the Pentax and Canon XT might be small, they use full-sized lenses. The Olympus uses smaller lenses but its sensor is the same APS-C sized sensor. Thus I feel the Olympus kit might be more compact.
    Last edited by Rhys; 08-21-2006 at 06:34 PM.

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