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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Some recent shots

    Played around a little this weekend and yesterday a bit. I am (obviously) struggling a little playing with apertures in Program mode. What I think I am going to get and actually get two different things. One problem I had was that I evidentially rotated the wheel and changed the exposure compensation to -2 and couldn't figure out how to get it back...I have since corrected that. However; the pictures of my youngest daugter seem to be a little dark to me. It was overcast yesterday, so I don't know if I am really that far off. Full efix can be read if you look at them in Smugmug. All were taken with the 17-40 and only PP is Smugmug color effects and one or two crops. Critique welcomed.



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    Ummmm...she has daddy's belly

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    (is that too many to throw up at once???)
    Last edited by JMWallace; 06-21-2006 at 11:32 AM.
    UPS drivers should wear red and white like Santa!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    539
    JMWallace,

    You got some nice subjects there especially your cute kid.

    I like the idea of framing through the tombstones although there's something that bothers me a bit about those images - maybe it's how the "frame" is not straight/centered/balanced where in my mind I sort of expect a frame to be so - but maybe you also aimed that way to get something interesting to see through the frame. The one image where the "tombstone frame" was straight and entered, it felt more visually pleasing.

    For your daughter's shots, I like how the color of her shirt complements her skin tones - nice. In general, I like the images where it appears that you shot her more at her eye level or even lower. Maybe try shooting those at max aperture to blur the background as much as possible especially if they don't do much for the pic. Maybe try not to cut off the edges of the hands and feet if most of the limb is framed in.

    For the building picture, I was imagining some of the shots with the dark glass windows and doors with some light emanating from the inside. Maybe when you get a slave flash you can revisit this interesting building. Loved the color, contrast and textures.

    -noyjimi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,590
    When you try to farme something quite tight, be careful of unintentional converging lines. The door, window and top thumbstone shots all converge quite a lot, and because it is clear that is not intentional, it becomes distracting and disturbing. I of course do that wrong all the time too.

    What can help if you can not get at the same level of the subject (the converging lines are caused by pointing the camera up in this case), try using a tele lens with more distance, this will reduce the effect. Or frame less tightly, so the effect becomes less pronounced.

    About the belly of your daughter... does she drink beer like her daddy too??

    Most of the time I like photos to be a bit more saturated, colour is pleasing to the eye and the world is more colourful than we realize when we look at our photos on the computer.
    Canon EOS 350D, Tamron SP AF 90mm F/2.8 macro, Sigma 18-50mm F2.8 DC EX, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM, Tokina AT-X124 Pro 12-24mm F4, Soligor 1.7x C/D4 DG Teleconvertor, Manfrotto 724B tripod, Canon Powershot S30

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    I know that...

    "flash" is an accursed word, in the world of f/2.8 lenses... but, when you are shooting against the bright sky... it can really save the shot. I use it to augment these kinds of high contrast shots... and it tends to reinvigorate the subject, which is slightly lost in the unfortunate shadowcast.

    That's what I see in the third shot of your daughter. Pop the flash... even though the camera says "no... you don't need it." You would be surprised how powerful the image becomes and how much less post process work you need to do balancing her image against the sky.

    Just for grins... if you have photoshop (any version), outline your daughter, in the pic, and then hit "autolevels". The effect is basically what will happen with a frontal flash... but the shadows tend to wash out a bit more with the flash, also. See if that doesn't make a tangible difference in the way the subject presents. (I took a quick crack at it, to demonstrate...)

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    Just a thought.

    I sense the creativity... flowing. Good job... enjoy that rig.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by noyjimi
    JMWallace,

    You got some nice subjects there especially your cute kid.

    I like the idea of framing through the tombstones although there's something that bothers me a bit about those images - maybe it's how the "frame" is not straight/centered/balanced where in my mind I sort of expect a frame to be so - but maybe you also aimed that way to get something interesting to see through the frame. The one image where the "tombstone frame" was straight and entered, it felt more visually pleasing.

    For your daughter's shots, I like how the color of her shirt complements her skin tones - nice. In general, I like the images where it appears that you shot her more at her eye level or even lower. Maybe try shooting those at max aperture to blur the background as much as possible especially if they don't do much for the pic. Maybe try not to cut off the edges of the hands and feet if most of the limb is framed in.

    For the building picture, I was imagining some of the shots with the dark glass windows and doors with some light emanating from the inside. Maybe when you get a slave flash you can revisit this interesting building. Loved the color, contrast and textures.

    -noyjimi
    Thanks noyjimi!!! Yes, Mya is a cutie...and a great budding personality to go with it!

    I think coldy may have pinpointed what it is about the monument that made you uneasy...tooo many different lines in too many directions. Once again, what my minds eye saw and the camera captured were two different things. The problem with the shots of the flag through the cross was that the flag was way off the left. More then I expected it to be before I was able to survey the scene up close. I was actually laying on the ground to take those. Before I got up close to it, I thought I would just be able to walk up and get the cross full open with the flag smack dab in the middle. NOPE...not a chance but thought I'd give it a shot anyway. Like you said, you like the idea...but in reality it didn't come off as I planned.

    One of the primary reasons to upgrade to the kit I have is my girls. I can't wait until I can get my oldest out alone for a bit...the I will try the challenge of both! Anyway...like I said at the top...I am struggling a little with playing with aperture settings. As far as background goes, agreed. Small city backyard. Getting them to the park is goal. I am happy with the focusing and mostly happy with the composition filling the frame...but I see what you mean about the hands and feet.

    Buildings are original and from the founding of my hometown. For those history buffs, Mine is the hometown of General Custer. Anyway, unfortunately the doors are all locked, so no way to do the effect you are thinking of...but would be pretty cool.

    Thank you for the input.

    Jeff
    Last edited by JMWallace; 06-21-2006 at 08:18 PM.

  6. #6
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    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by coldrain
    When you try to farme something quite tight, be careful of unintentional converging lines. The door, window and top thumbstone shots all converge quite a lot, and because it is clear that is not intentional, it becomes distracting and disturbing. I of course do that wrong all the time too.

    What can help if you can not get at the same level of the subject (the converging lines are caused by pointing the camera up in this case), try using a tele lens with more distance, this will reduce the effect. Or frame less tightly, so the effect becomes less pronounced.
    Is it really all that wrong...or just what we are able to do at the time. I wish I would have thought to bring a ladder with me!! No, I agree. It would be more visually appealing if I could have shot it head on. As I said to noyjimi, the monument shots didn't turn out like I thought.

    Quote Originally Posted by coldrain
    About the belly of your daughter... does she drink beer like her daddy too??
    uummmm, I wondered where all those empties came from. I didn't "remember" drinking em!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by coldrain
    Most of the time I like photos to be a bit more saturated, colour is pleasing to the eye and the world is more colourful than we realize when we look at our photos on the computer.
    I agree about the colour. I really didn't touch them with any PP. Let me master good photography before I tackle trying to understand Photoshop. (and spring on my wife that I need to buy some $500 software and a much more powerful desktop!!) Would you attribute that lack of colour saturation to me messing around with the apertures and not hitting it right on??? Any pointers??

    Thanks coldy!

    Jeff

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap
    "flash" is an accursed word, in the world of f/2.8 lenses... but, when you are shooting against the bright sky... it can really save the shot. I use it to augment these kinds of high contrast shots... and it tends to reinvigorate the subject, which is slightly lost in the unfortunate shadowcast.

    That's what I see in the third shot of your daughter. Pop the flash... even though the camera says "no... you don't need it." You would be surprised how powerful the image becomes and how much less post process work you need to do balancing her image against the sky.
    I didn't even think about that. I was so busy trying to not miss one of those golden moments and playing with the apertures that didn't even enter my mind. I thought there was plenty of overcast light...but as coldrain noticed, they lacked nice saturation.

    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap
    Just for grins... if you have photoshop (any version), outline your daughter, in the pic, and then hit "autolevels". The effect is basically what will happen with a frontal flash... but the shadows tend to wash out a bit more with the flash, also. See if that doesn't make a tangible difference in the way the subject presents. (I took a quick crack at it, to demonstrate...)
    430EX is next on my list...of course i have been eyeing the darn little brother of your BEAST. 70-200 f/4 lately too. Thank you for taking the time to show me what the difference would have been if I gave that thing a little pop!!

    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap
    I sense the creativity... flowing. Good job... enjoy that rig.
    They are flowing!!! They have been pent up for some time using that G5 for so long!!

    Thank you Don!

    Jeff

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Des Plaines, IL
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    Lightbulb The best idea for color correction...

    Look at the picture... look at what is supposed to be white. I mean, really white. I saw it was the white stripes of your daughter's shirt. I corrected until is was actually white... not that magenta/cyan look it had in the original. All the other colors then fall into line.

    With a contrasty shot like this... the background is fine and well lit, if not overly so... it's the shadowcast that has corrupted the shot. Really, that is all that needs to be corrected. That's why I outlined her... did the "autolevels" for a major adjustments and then minor color highlight changes and there you have it... selective color balance.

    The reason you outline her is that the "selection" (anything in the outline) will be the only thing factored into the balancing... that bright background is totally ignored.

    You'll have a lot more control with the full sized original, but the intent is the same.

    Once gain... have fun... learning. Don't be afraid to experiment... you'll just learn even more.

    BTW: If you don't have Photoshop... you're back to nature... use the flash. LOL
    Last edited by DonSchap; 06-21-2006 at 08:49 PM.
    Don Schap - BFA, Digital Photography
    A Photographer Is Forever
    Look, I did not create the optical laws of the Universe ... I simply learned to deal with them.
    Remember: It is usually the GLASS, not the camera (except for moving to Full Frame), that gives you the most improvement in your photography.

    flickr & Sdi

  9. #9
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    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonSchap
    BTW: If you don't have Photoshop... you're back to nature... use the flash. LOL
    I have Corel PaintShop Pro X. I am sure it can some of the stuff that Photoshop can, but with the little ones my free time is limited. After they go to bed, i have about 2-3 hours to play. I really haven't learned how to even use that. Not to to mention that I am mostly usinga a laptop. Not quite ideal for editing and really should get that Huey thingy.

    Thanks for the lesson. I am going to try it using PaintShop.

    Jeff

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    539
    Quote Originally Posted by JMWallace
    Is it really all that wrong...or just what we are able to do at the time. I wish I would have thought to bring a ladder with me!! No, I agree. It would be more visually appealing if I could have shot it head on. As I said to noyjimi, the monument shots didn't turn out like I thought.
    JMWallace,

    You could correct the perspective in software like Photoshop. Alternatively, use a tilt shift lens.

    In the monument shots, the converging lines didn't bother me as much as the "frame" (the hole in the monument) being off-center/leaning - http://jmw-photo.smugmug.com/gallery/1584939/2/76805659 appeared more pleasing than the others by being more centered - kind of like a regular, boxy frame that my mind imagines. The converging lines seemed more distracting in the building/window/door images - I don't want to sound circular, but because of its lines. Anyway, as they say, hindsight is always 20/20 so this is always a learning process - a very fun one!

    BTW they must maintain that building well - at least it looks like it's in good shape considering its age.

    -noyjimi

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