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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    476

    Convert to black and white with some color?

    Hey guys,

    I remember a while back I saw a tutorial for photoshop where someone converted a wedding picture so everything was black and white except for the rose, which was a vivid red. I tried searching for it but was not able to find it.

    Does anyone have a link to that tutorial or something similar? Thanks!
    Tim
    Canon 5D Mark II, 1D Mark II, Rebel XS
    50 F1.4, 85 F1.8, 100 2.8 Macro 70-200 F4L 580EX, 24-70 F2.8L

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    eastern ontario
    Posts
    401
    i feel your pain brother... i searched for days!!!! could do it in picture it 7, but not pS....

    anyway, the easiest way i know is

    control+J.......... creates another layer(copy)
    now click on image, adjustments, hue/saturation....slide the saturation all the way to the left....
    once completed, get the eraser and erase what u want colored.... voila

    hope i helped u as others have helped me
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Near St. Louis
    Posts
    3,528

    Layer Mask

    Phat kid did a pretty job explaining the way he does it . . .

    However, I do selective color slightly different. Ever since discovering the power of layers I like to use it as much as possible. Its very effective for selective coloring. . .

    Open your image and use the keyboard shortcut ctrl+j like phatkid used to make a copy of the background layer:



    Now, reduce the saturation of that top layer:



    Next, with the top layer still selected, choose from the Layer menu, Layer > Layer Mask > "Reveal All" [I'll explain why we aren't going to "Hide All" this time]:



    Again, keeping the top layer selected hit the "E" key - this will change your current tool to the Eraser tool. Why we didn't select a "Hide All" layer mask is because since we want the flower to be in color and not everything else, the flower represents the least amount of space that needs to change. If we did use "Hide All" we'd have to paint back everything but the flower - makes more work. Ok we have our eraser tool selected, hit the "X" key to have our foreground color change from black to white [By default the foreground color should be black, but as you can see in my first image it was a light blue - hit D to reset that tool so it is black and then hit X to get it to change to white] and we begin "Painting" back our color image:



    Please note that I have used a hard edged brush for this process - I'll switch to a soft edge a little later. . . Now here I am painting in some of the finer detail up top - I'm using a softedge brush for this because it allows the transition from the colored flower that I'm "Painting" back to the B/W background nice and gradual - its not a hard transition from orange to black like I'd get with a hard edged brush. . . :



    now - it might be hard to tell, like in this image, but I've been a little sloppy in my "Painting." One neat trick with layers is you can highlight your "Painting" in a bright pinkish red color to make your work more visible. You can turn this highlight on by pressing the "\" key:



    You can really see my sloppiness at the top of the flower - Simply hit the "X" button to switch your background color so we can "Paint" back that black and white back ground. . . . This is the real reason I use it - if you make a mistake you don't have to use the "Undo" button, you can simply paint back your background and repair your mistake. this is a real time saver especially if you don't notice your mistake until after about another 25 erasing steps. As you can see in the next image, my history pallate is full of "Eraser" steps.

    So real quick and sloppy heres the finish product. . . a simple ctrl+E to merge my top layer and bottom layer and I'm done:



    I hope this helps out
    Nikon D90 | Sigma 10-20 HSM | DX 18-105 f3.5-5.6 VR | DX 55-200 VR | 35 f/2.0 D | 50 f/1.4 D | 85mm F/1.8 D | SB-800 x 3 | SU-800
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    Quote Originally Posted by te1221
    Hey guys,

    I remember a while back I saw a tutorial for photoshop where someone converted a wedding picture so everything was black and white except for the rose, which was a vivid red. I tried searching for it but was not able to find it.

    Does anyone have a link to that tutorial or something similar? Thanks!
    This should be the link you are talking about.

    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11351
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    9
    that was a good tutorial aparmley

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    476
    Yes..... this was everything I needed. Thanks guys!
    Tim
    Canon 5D Mark II, 1D Mark II, Rebel XS
    50 F1.4, 85 F1.8, 100 2.8 Macro 70-200 F4L 580EX, 24-70 F2.8L

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    Quote Originally Posted by aparmley
    Please note that I have used a hard edged brush for this process - I'll switch to a soft edge a little later. . . Now here I am painting in some of the finer detail up top - I'm using a softedge brush for this because it allows the transition from the colored flower that I'm "Painting" back to the B/W background nice and gradual - its not a hard transition from orange to black like I'd get with a hard edged brush. . . :

    I hope this helps out
    A little tip, especially when you get close to the edge of the transition, is to drop the flow of the brush down to <10% and use a buildup method which gives more control. I'll typically use 4-6% flow on a soft edged brush after I've painted in the bulk. I also will zoom in to 300-400% if I want to be very precise.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by D Thompson; 06-15-2006 at 06:06 AM.
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Near St. Louis
    Posts
    3,528
    Quote Originally Posted by angeloloria
    that was a good tutorial aparmley
    Thanks Angel - it was a quick and simple.


    Quote Originally Posted by D Thompson
    A little tip, especially when you get close to the edge of the transition, is to drop the flow of the brush down to <10% and use a buildup method which gives more control. I'll typically use 4-6% flow on a soft edged brush after I've painted in the bulk. I also will zoom in to 300-400% if I want to be very precise.

    Hope this helps.

    Thanks for the flow tip Dennis.
    Nikon D90 | Sigma 10-20 HSM | DX 18-105 f3.5-5.6 VR | DX 55-200 VR | 35 f/2.0 D | 50 f/1.4 D | 85mm F/1.8 D | SB-800 x 3 | SU-800
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Georgetown, KY
    Posts
    1,627
    Quote Originally Posted by aparmley
    Thanks for the flow tip Dennis.
    You're welcome. I'll rarely go over 10% flow unless I've got a big area that I want to do quickly. It takes a few swipes to notice, especially @ 4%, but it's worth it for the control you get. Glad to help.
    Dennis

    Canon 5D
    Canon 20D


    Georgetown, KY Photographer
    Retouching

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kapellen, Antwerp, Belgium
    Posts
    345
    Gave it a quick try:


    Comments welcome

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