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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Posts
    28

    Magic erasor tool??

    I've been trying to erase my backgrounds so that I can put my subject on another background.. this is how I do it:

    1. Magic eraser parts
    2. Background eraser
    3. Zoom in and set my background diameter smaller and slowly erase..

    Seems so unprofessional (being a photoshop noob.. i'm only 15! haha). Is there a solution for this? Or does everyone do that too?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Delfgauw, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,207
    The things you mentioned are a good way of removing a background, not at all unprofessional . Another thing you could try to do is select the subject using the laso tool, invert the selection so that only the rest is selected and delete all that. This is a very quick way, but it does not work on all subjects.
    Nikon D-50
    // Nikkor 70-300 f/4-5.6 VR // Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
    // Sigma 17-70 f/2.8-4.5 ...// Nikon SB-600
    // Sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6......// Nikon Series E 135 mm f/2.8
    // Kiron 105 f/2.8 Macro....// Manfrotto 190XPROB + 488RC4
    // Nikkor 35 f/1.8..........// Sigma 500 mm f/8

    My website: http://www.dennisdolkens.nl

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Posts
    28
    sry, you're saying outline my object then select inverse then delete all that? Is there an easier way to select my object?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Delfgauw, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,207
    I'm sorry, when I said lasso tool I meant magnetic lasso tool. You can select this tool by clicking on the lasso tool just a bit longer than usual. You then get a small selection menu where you can select the magnetic lasso tool. The magnetic lasso tool is a very easy way to select objects as it is inclined to follow the edges of the object. This does not work very well for complex subjects with unclear and irregular edges, though.

    I hope this is clear, otherwise I'll just make a couple of screenshots to show it.
    Nikon D-50
    // Nikkor 70-300 f/4-5.6 VR // Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
    // Sigma 17-70 f/2.8-4.5 ...// Nikon SB-600
    // Sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6......// Nikon Series E 135 mm f/2.8
    // Kiron 105 f/2.8 Macro....// Manfrotto 190XPROB + 488RC4
    // Nikkor 35 f/1.8..........// Sigma 500 mm f/8

    My website: http://www.dennisdolkens.nl

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Posts
    28
    yes.. pls posts some screenshots.. i'll definately understand the matter better

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Delfgauw, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,207
    Ok, I've made some screenshots.

    First of all, when editing a photograph in this way it helps to change the background to a layer. You can do this by right clicking on the background and selecting Layer from Background. This gives some flexibility in the end as it allows you to easily put a different background behind the image:



    Then you select the magnetic lasso tool by clicking on the button of the lasso tool for a bit longer than you would do to select it:



    You can select your subject by clicking somewhere on the edge of the subject (in a corner) and then draging along the edge. The tool will automatically follow the edge. If it creates points you don't like you can delete them by pressing the delete button. By the way, as you can see in the screenshot, the tool has been set with a feather. I used a feather of 5 pixels, but I think it would be better to use a smaller one.



    In the end you click on the point you started with. You will see that the cursor changes when you are above that point. Your subject is now completely selected. Now you can inverse your selection:



    You can delete the area that is now selected to get your result:



    There are many other possibilities you can do with the selected area. You can for instance turn it into black and white for a creative effect and to make your subject stand out. You can also use the lens blur feature (filter >> blur >> lens blur) to fake bokeh (note that you will always be able to tell real bokeh from faked bokeh).



    Nikon D-50
    // Nikkor 70-300 f/4-5.6 VR // Nikkor 50 mm f/1.8
    // Sigma 17-70 f/2.8-4.5 ...// Nikon SB-600
    // Sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6......// Nikon Series E 135 mm f/2.8
    // Kiron 105 f/2.8 Macro....// Manfrotto 190XPROB + 488RC4
    // Nikkor 35 f/1.8..........// Sigma 500 mm f/8

    My website: http://www.dennisdolkens.nl

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    Posts
    28
    Oh this rocks.. very clear result.. thank you!

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