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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    3

    Exclamation Are my good old 35mm lenses useless with new D-SLR ? Need some input !

    I would like to switch to a Digital SLR - the only model within my budget range is the Digital Rebel. I own 4 Canon/Sigma EF lenses from my 35mm Elan that would fit the Digital Rebel mount (good) - only that the cropping factor of the Rebel's sensor (1:1.6) messes up the focal ranges (bad).

    Should I hold on to my lenses until an affordable Digital SRL with a full size sensor (35mm equivalent) hits the market OR should I sell the lenses NOW for little money before they lose even more value ?

    Thanks for your wise words.
    Last edited by Axxfischer; 10-28-2004 at 08:02 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Grafton, MA
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    1,714
    As long as you are aware of the crop factor your Canon lenses should work fine. Your Sigma lenses may not. Older Sigma lanses have had some issues with the DReb, in some cases producing an error that can require the camera to be set in for repair. Sigma may "rechip" the lenses for free if you contact them.
    www.jamisonwexler.com

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Monterey Bay
    Posts
    6,029
    Quote Originally Posted by Axxfischer
    I would like to switch to a Digital SLR - the only model within my budget range is the Digital Rebel. I own 4 Canon/Sigma EF lenses from my 35mm Elan that would fit the Digital Rebel mount (good) - only that the cropping factor of the Rebel's sensor (1:1.6) messes up the focal ranges (bad).

    Should I hold on to my lenses until an affordable Digital SRL with a full size sensor (35mm equivalent) hits the market OR should I sell the lenses NOW for little money before they lose even more value ?

    Thanks for your wise words.
    To start; you can use standard 35mm lenses on an APS-C sized sensor, but you cant use an APS-C optimized lens on a 35mm camera without vigneting. Other than that it's pretty wide open. Of course manual lenses will remain manual, and non-MCU lenses will not provide feedback, but the lenses are still usable.

    Those EF lenses will come in to play a bit more than you think. The cropping factor will make those Telephoto lenses into super telephoto lenses without changing the maximum aperture (very good). This is like adding a 1.6X multiplier onto your Elan without the aperture penalty.

    On the WA side just get the kit lens (18-55) to cover that part of the spectrum. If your collection includes a 50mm f1.8 and/or a 105mm f2.8, then you now have a low cost lens that does what a more expensive portrait/landscape lens can do.

    It will be a long, long, (long, long) wait for a full frame dSLR in the Digital Rebel price class or even the 20D price range. I won't use the word never, but without some major breakthrough in semiconductor wafer fabrication costs it's just not going to happen.
    D7000, D70, CP990, CP900, FE.
    50mm f/1.8, Sigma 18-125, Sigma 24-70 f/2.8, Nikon 18-105 VR, Nikon 55-200 VR, Nikon 43-86 f/3.5 AiS, Vivitar 28-90 F/2.8-3.5 Macro, Vivitar 75-205 F/3.8-4.8, SB800.
    Ha! See, I can change...


    http://d70fan.smugmug.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    137

    They'll work ok, at least the canon lenses

    I just bought a digital rebel, the way I understand it any EF lens will work on it whether it's made for the film version or the digital. I've never heard of a off-brand lens actually damaging the camera electronics but I have heard of them just not working properly. This is because Canon doesn't license the mounts or the protocols to anybody and any third party lens or gadget is reverse-engineered. Like he said, often sigma will re-chip the lense for you but I've heard they'll only do it once--they use some excuse that they can't more than once (doesn't make much sense to me). Of the reviews I've read of sigma lenses with the digital rebel there's a common complaint--they are very slow to focus in low light conditions. I think it's going be quite awhile before you see an affordable digital with the same size sensor as a 35mm frame--when we do I hope you're made of money at least for the first few models. If you've got the cash buy now, otherwise you might be waiting years for exactly what you want.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Wild, Wonderful, Wyoming
    Posts
    1,043

    Digital lenses

    The difference between a "regular" Canon EF lens and an EF-S lens is the EF-S lenses rear element is closer to the sensor. This takes advantage of the 1.6x crop factor allowing for a smaller more lightweight lens. The EF-S lenses still use the same focal length designations as the EF lenses and still have a 1.6x crop factor. The Canon 10D doesn't even have provisions for EF-S lenses, and takes fine images. The biggest problem you'll have with the 1.6x crop factor is you lose on the wide end, (like stated above you gain nicely on the tele end) so your 28mm is no longer a wide angle lens, but more of a normal lens. The Drebel's kit lens will get you back to nearly a 28mm with the crop factor and is an adequate lens, and pretty good if stopped down a bit.
    I don't see the price of a full frame sensor camera coming down to mere mortal range for quite a while, I have just gotten used to the crop factor and purchased a super wide to act as my wide. The Drebel is a fine camera and takes pictures every bit as good as higher priced DSLRs, the 1.6x crop factor is only a minor annoyance. Your lenses, if they are of decent quality, should hold their value, the "digital" lenses have slightly different technology, but are mostly marketing. Canon claimed they would be smaller, lightweight, and lower priced, they were right on 2 out of 3, they are still pretty expensive, the two new EF-S lenses introduced this year are quite expensive. I am completely happy with my 10D and my lens collection, and have rarely wanted something wider. 10D, 17-40, 28-105, 80-200, 300.

  6. #6
    paffle Guest

    Tamron 28-200mm

    I am using a Tamron 28-200mm lens with a conventional EOS 500, but contemplating buying a Digital Rebel. Will I be able to use my old lens with my new camera?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Monterey Bay
    Posts
    6,029
    Quote Originally Posted by paffle
    I am using a Tamron 28-200mm lens with a conventional EOS 500, but contemplating buying a Digital Rebel. Will I be able to use my old lens with my new camera?
    Yes. But because of the crop factor (1.6X), due to the comparable sensor vs. film size, your 28-200 is now a 45-320, so you will give up the WA end of the focal length. So the kit lens (18-55) may still be a good investment to cover the wide angle shots.
    D7000, D70, CP990, CP900, FE.
    50mm f/1.8, Sigma 18-125, Sigma 24-70 f/2.8, Nikon 18-105 VR, Nikon 55-200 VR, Nikon 43-86 f/3.5 AiS, Vivitar 28-90 F/2.8-3.5 Macro, Vivitar 75-205 F/3.8-4.8, SB800.
    Ha! See, I can change...


    http://d70fan.smugmug.com/

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