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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    4

    What is the useful life of digital cameras?

    Can anybody comment with experience on this subject? Our family had two Kodak LS443 camera both fail within months of each other early this year and late last year, both having taken only about

    2000-2300 shots. They just recorded a blank (black) image. This was well covered previously in several posts in the Kodak forum on this site.
    I'm not complaining about the particular camera, or Kodak. (Although I've switched manufacturers) My question is more fundamental. Does anyone really know the useful life of these cameras and the

    technology behind them? Particularly the imaging sensors. Recently, there has been a rash of reports on this site about failures of all brands of cameras using a particular sensor, apparently made

    by one manufacturer.

    I was thinking of going with this canon camera now:
    http://www.viewscore.com/vsPP/3/1429
    it is ranked 1th in its category after analyazing more then 5000 editorial reviews...

    thanks,

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,175
    Provided that you use them and take care of them well, compact digital cameras should last you for at least 5 years or for about 5000 shots. Many cameras last longer than this. If your camera dies after 2000 shots, that's very, very poor quality.

    To my knowledge, sensors don't "break" over time. All they do is gather light. Something else breaks like the flash (broken capacitor), the lens zooming mechanism, the LCD, etc.

    Don't buy the A85. Get its successor, the A520 or better yet, the A610. The A85 has been off the shelves for almost a year already.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
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    7,147
    Electronic gizmos are made cheaply and are not designed to last more than 2 years because by then they're obsolete.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,807
    the shutter on my a80 failed at around 9500 shots. thankfully, i used my camera a lot so the failure was well within warranty coverage. i also know someone who occasionally used a 2-3 year old 2mp sony digi-cam that broke down with under 500 shot. now that sucks! (i'm giving this person my a80).

    i think that the manufacturers probably figure that most people don't shoot as much as i do and therefore don't build the most of the new cameras to last. it's really hard to tell how long your camera will hold up.
    canon 17-40 L, 70-200 f2.8 L, 400 f5.6 L, 50 f1.4 & f1.8, 1.4x TC, sigma 15 f2.8 fisheye, flash 500 DG Super, kenko extension tubes

    note to self: don't participate in sad, silly threads unless you're looking for sad, silly responses.

    "anti-BS filter" (from andy): http://dcresource.com/forums/showpos...94&postcount=4

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,770
    I had 2 Nikons spontaneously break. One mechanical on day 3, one one electronics after 2 years and about 6,000 shots. My mother's A60 broke after about 3 years due to being packed in the airline baggage (extreme temperatures) - being fixed under Canon's recall.

    Some disagree, but I would always advise anyone to buy an inexpensive 3 to 5 year extended warranty. Durability does seem to be an issue on digicams. MACK may balk at some situations, but for $39 its worth a shot.
    Last edited by Vich; 11-03-2005 at 06:47 PM.
    Gear List:
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    2,364
    I got almost 10k shots out of my Kodak DX6490 before I gave it away.
    US Navy--Hooyah!

    Nikon D700/D300|17-35 f/2.8, 24-70 f/2.8, Sigmalux, 80-200 f/2.8, 16 f/2.8 fisheye,

    Lots of flashes and Honl gear.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,175
    These are all digicams right? None of these breakages occur on DSLR's. I might venture a sweeping generalization that things made even 5 years ago have better realiability and build quality than the stuff today. My much maligned Kodak, despite its image quality and features, was made in Japan (as opposed to wherever they do it now), and apart from a little chip in the plastic, is holding up very well after 5 years. Feels very solid for digicam, and I could even bet it could survive some drops and definitely some bumps (I don't want to try though).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    I think you'll find that when things cost more, they last longer. It's partly because we cosset them more but also because the manufacturers are more concerned with making it than with making it cheaply. Example: my mother's first washing machine lasted 30 years. How many will last more than 5 now?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by sigma65
    Can anybody comment with experience on this subject? Our family had two Kodak LS443 camera both fail within months of each other early this year and late last year, both having taken only about 2000-2300 shots. They just recorded a blank (black) image. This was well covered previously in several posts in the Kodak forum on this site.
    First, you must define "failing". A camera "failing" has nothing to do with the sensor or any other part breaking on the camera; a cameras life span is measured in whats called a "cycle" and has to do with how long the shutter will last or how many pics you can expect to take before your shutter goes belly up. For instance, on a Canon 1Ds Mark II, it's cycle is about 100,000. Some of this information you can get from Canon on the EOS cams. A camera has not failed because a part has come off or the sensor goes dead. Although its sad that something on it is broken; that does not mean the camera has failed because the part can be replaced (whether it be cheap or not) and once the repair is done, then the camera can keep ticking.

    It's up to you if you want to spend the money on a repair or not. But just because a part breaks on your camera, does not mean it has failed. Something on any electronic product is bound to break. Just because both of the sensors on your Kodaks went dead, while I know its sad and frustrating, it does not mean your cameras failed. Just have the sensors replaced and it'll be okay. Canon's doing it for free so may Kodak if you call or check their web site.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,770
    Quote Originally Posted by Xeke
    First, you must define "failing". A camera "failing" has nothing to do with the sensor or any other part breaking on the camera; a cameras life span is measured in whats called a "cycle" and has to do with how long the shutter will last or how many pics you can expect to take before your shutter goes belly up. For instance, on a Canon 1Ds Mark II, it's cycle is about 100,000. Some of this information you can get from Canon on the EOS cams. A camera has not failed because a part has come off or the sensor goes dead. Although its sad that something on it is broken; that does not mean the camera has failed because the part can be replaced (whether it be cheap or not) and once the repair is done, then the camera can keep ticking.

    It's up to you if you want to spend the money on a repair or not. But just because a part breaks on your camera, does not mean it has failed. Something on any electronic product is bound to break. Just because both of the sensors on your Kodaks went dead, while I know its sad and frustrating, it does not mean your cameras failed. Just have the sensors replaced and it'll be okay. Canon's doing it for free so may Kodak if you call or check their web site.
    I am sorry, but this is obsurd.

    Failing means it stopped working. Period. The shutter too can be repaired, just like any other failure. When it fails to operate sufficiently to take an image not due to being dropped in the swimming pool, it qualifies.

    Now; if you're rating the shutter's MTBF (Mean Time Between Faliure), as the DSLR's have done, then other failures don't count simply because that's not what you're talking about.

    Camera failure is camera failure is camera failure.
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