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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Atlanta, GA (orig. NYC)
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    Question Shooting in an Aquarium

    As Atlanta prepares for the launch of one of the largest aquariums in the world (The Georgia Aquarium), I'm wondering about lenses, filters, settings and flash modes. Any suggestions of tips and techniques will be appreciated.
    - Kenyada
    In Life, as in Photography, things look much brighter, once you remove the lens cap
    Nikon D70 w/18-70mm | Sigma 70-300mm Macro II | SB800 | SC29 Cord | ML-L3 Remote | Canon iP5000/i9900 Printers | Feisol CM1401 cf Mo'pod/Manfrotto 3229 Head

  2. #2
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    Aug 2004
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    CA
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    Mine all seem to turn out like these ...






    I'm thinking, bring a monopod and a very fast lense. Flash won't work at all. Probably a polarizing filter too. Tell me what you think.
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  3. #3
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    Jul 2005
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    a fast lens will probably work great... im thinking? something like canon's 50 f/1.8. i dont know much aout nikon though.

    you could bring a mono and take advantage of long shutter speeds?

    i think your best bet is going wide open with a fast lens, bumping iso to 1600.
    barnesquared

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  4. #4
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    Jul 2004
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    Stick your lens right on the glass of the tank so that the two are touching. This will help to stabilize the camera and avoid any reflections. You can then fire your flash into the tank... I have some pics from the Boston Aquarium somewhere where I used this technique quite effectively.
    www.jamisonwexler.com

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA (orig. NYC)
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    Quote Originally Posted by eastbluffs
    Mine all seem to turn out like these ...


    I'm thinking, bring a monopod and a very fast lense. Flash won't work at all. Probably a polarizing filter too. Tell me what you think.
    They look very good. I'm excited about the possibilities. I'm definitlely going with some kind of pod - mono or tri - though I will try it both with a fast lens, and slower shutter speeds to see what works most consistently. The polarizing filter will be added to the mix as I determine what kind of reflections I'm dealing with.

    Thanks, east.
    - Kenyada
    In Life, as in Photography, things look much brighter, once you remove the lens cap
    Nikon D70 w/18-70mm | Sigma 70-300mm Macro II | SB800 | SC29 Cord | ML-L3 Remote | Canon iP5000/i9900 Printers | Feisol CM1401 cf Mo'pod/Manfrotto 3229 Head

  6. #6
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    Jul 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA (orig. NYC)
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    Quote Originally Posted by barnesquared
    a fast lens will probably work great... im thinking? something like canon's 50 f/1.8. i dont know much aout nikon though.

    you could bring a mono and take advantage of long shutter speeds?

    i think your best bet is going wide open with a fast lens, bumping iso to 1600.
    Great suggestions. I'm gonna try EVERYTHING, just to see what works best. Thanks. If I come up with anything worthy of the great DCRP galleries, I'll post 'em.
    - Kenyada
    In Life, as in Photography, things look much brighter, once you remove the lens cap
    Nikon D70 w/18-70mm | Sigma 70-300mm Macro II | SB800 | SC29 Cord | ML-L3 Remote | Canon iP5000/i9900 Printers | Feisol CM1401 cf Mo'pod/Manfrotto 3229 Head

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA (orig. NYC)
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    116
    Quote Originally Posted by jamison55
    Stick your lens right on the glass of the tank so that the two are touching. This will help to stabilize the camera and avoid any reflections. You can then fire your flash into the tank... I have some pics from the Boston Aquarium somewhere where I used this technique quite effectively.
    I'm wondering, given the heightened security in all public venues, if they will let me get anywhere close to the tanks. I'll try. If not, a monopod and the Sigma 70-300mm Macro will have to suffice. One thing's for sure, I'll have plenty of fishies to practice with. 100,000 animals from 500 species in five million gallons of fresh and marine water.

    It opens on Novemeber 23rd! As they say here in Atlanta: "Y'all" come see us, hear?
    - Kenyada
    In Life, as in Photography, things look much brighter, once you remove the lens cap
    Nikon D70 w/18-70mm | Sigma 70-300mm Macro II | SB800 | SC29 Cord | ML-L3 Remote | Canon iP5000/i9900 Printers | Feisol CM1401 cf Mo'pod/Manfrotto 3229 Head

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    378
    If you can't get the camera against the glass, I think a polarizer is a must. The biggest challenge in that setting is glare off the glass. Plus, you probably are going to need to shoot at odd angles to glass given that the animals don't pose for photos too well, and the aquarium will probably be quite crowded.

    Erik

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    296
    Quote Originally Posted by jamison55
    Stick your lens right on the glass of the tank so that the two are touching. This will help to stabilize the camera and avoid any reflections. You can then fire your flash into the tank... I have some pics from the Boston Aquarium somewhere where I used this technique quite effectively.
    Good call Jamison. Thanks! Love to see some of your shots.

    My photos were to illustrate my frustration (movement, blur). I shouldn't be too frustrated though, I noticed I had the apeture at f10.0 (DOUH )! Color was good but otherwise many were too blurry to use, and these were not very sharp at that.

    These were at the Long Beach aquarium where we have annual passes. Very nice place, but small enough to cover the entire place in about 2 hours. They do let us touch the glass.

    So, how about a 18mm or shorter prime lense, even rimmed hood so it can press to glass, flash, etc. An 50mm (80mm efl) would often be too long since many tanks (like those shown here) aren't that deep. Monopod wouldn't be useful if glass can be touched since they are recessed.

    Can't wait to make a repeat visit! Its about a 30 mile drive for us, but no big deal for the weekends.

    EDIT: Read the bit in my photography book. They say to photography at an angle to the glass so as to not catch the reflection of the flash.
    Last edited by eastbluffs; 09-21-2005 at 01:30 PM.
    Canon 20D
    Canon Lenses 135L f2.0, 50mm f1.8, 18-55mm kit
    Tamron 28-75 f2.8
    Sigma 70-300 f4 - 5.6 APO DG
    Other 580EX flash, Expodisc, carbon fiber monopod

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