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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    28

    Pictures of a full moon

    Let's say I want to take some pictures of a full moon. What would be the most appropriate settings for such an image? I have a Sony DSC-F717 and have set it to manual, played around with a few different settings, but have not achieved a very good shot - yet. Suggestions for shutter speed, ISO setting, apeture size, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Would it also be helpful to use a filter of some kind?

    Gracias.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by GMNelson
    Let's say I want to take some pictures of a full moon. What would be the most appropriate settings for such an image? I have a Sony DSC-F717 and have set it to manual, played around with a few different settings, but have not achieved a very good shot - yet. Suggestions for shutter speed, ISO setting, apeture size, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Would it also be helpful to use a filter of some kind?

    Gracias.
    Moon pics are extremely hard to take considering the low- or virtually non-existent lighting available. However, if your camera has a bulb mode, I'd suggest using that. Furthermore, a remote shutter release control and a tripod are all considered a must during night pics. If a remote shutter release is not available to you, simply use the timer feature. Good luck!

  3. #3
    niknak Guest

    "Sunny 16" Rule

    I disagree with the last post - a full moon is actually a sunny landscape.

    If you're just trying to get a clear picture of the moon then there is a fairly easy rule of thumb - the "Sunny 16" rule:

    Shutter speed 1/ISO at f16. (I don't know the specifics of your model of camera but this rule works on my Fuji S7000).

    Also if your camera has an auto-bracketing mode use that and set it to +/- 0.7 EV.

    Juggle the shutter speed and aperture as necessary to stay within your camera's limits and check the pictures as you take them.

    Focusing is another problem - if your camera supports it set the focus to infinity. If not, another trick is to leave the lens cap on and half-press the shutter button - the camera will try to focus but fail - most digital cameras will leave the lens focused at infinity. Set the focusing mode to manual before removing the lens cap.

    Also a tripod is essential for the slow shutter speeds being used. A cable release is also essential if your camera supports it - if you can't use a cable release then use the camera's timer.

    Lastly get out of town and the higher up you are the better (the air is cleaner and thinner).

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by niknak; 10-19-2004 at 03:11 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    4

    full moon a sunny landscape

    IF
    Quote Originally Posted by niknak
    a full moon is actually a sunny landscape.
    I wonder why I should use a slow shutter speed? Don't normally need that for a sunny landscape shot ...

    Actually I know (from experience) that I do need a tripod and long exposure time, but if you think about it ... it's true, the moon (at least its visible part) has sunshine at full blast, not attenuated by any atmosphere. Why do I need long exposure time and / or high sensitivity to shoot it then? Can anyone enlighten me, please?

    -------------------------
    leave nothing but footprints, take nothing but pictures
    Last edited by wus; 11-19-2004 at 04:57 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    26
    Attaching Moon taken at 32X Digital zoom with Canon S1 IS... Without any lens, tripod etc used. Just using Imange Stabilizer ON...
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    http://shadow.photos.me.uk/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Formerly South Wales. Now South Carolina.
    Posts
    7,147
    Ok. This was taken at about a 60th as far as I can recall (my GF's PC doesn't have software to read exif data). It's handheld, IS on and was taken from Columbia, SC a few days ago.
    Last edited by Rhys; 06-04-2007 at 01:30 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Paradise (aka Key West, FL)
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by niknak
    I disagree with the last post - a full moon is actually a sunny landscape.

    If you're just trying to get a clear picture of the moon then there is a fairly easy rule of thumb - the "Sunny 16" rule:
    Almost dead on. The moon surface is somewhat of a dark grey and often yields the best image when you us the "Hazy Bright" values from the "Sunny 16" rule. This would be more like f/11 with the shutter speed set to match the ISO.

    Also, as mentioned already, the moons appearant motion (caused mostly by the earth's spinning rather than the moon's own proper motion) is fast enough to cause motion blur with exposures longer than 1/60 with normal lenses and may require highter speeds (1/250th and up) with long telephotos.

    Of course, when you are photographing the dark earthshine lit, rather than the bright sunlit, portions of a cresent or new moon, you have a rather low light situation that cannot be properly photographed without the type of tracking mount found on astronomical telescopes and then one that has a lunar mode in addition to the common stellar mode. The necessary shutter speed is way too long to get a sharp pix otherwise.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Co. Meath, Ireland
    Posts
    21

    Smile

    Taken with my new Canon Powershot S1 IS. This was the best 2 out of about 20 shots...

    10x Optical and 32x Digital zoom
    1/500th Sec
    f/5.0
    ISO400

    I cropped and merged the images for easier on screen viewing.

    Last edited by r0nn13; 01-28-2005 at 11:19 AM. Reason: adding photograph...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    87


    This is with my Panasonic FZ20 using Shutter priority mode (hand held)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,099

    Great resource page on this

    Quote Originally Posted by GMNelson
    Let's say I want to take some pictures of a full moon. What would be the most appropriate settings for such an image? I have a Sony DSC-F717 and have set it to manual, played around with a few different settings, but have not achieved a very good shot - yet. Suggestions for shutter speed, ISO setting, apeture size, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Would it also be helpful to use a filter of some kind?

    Gracias.
    Look at this article for more information:
    http://www.nightscapes.net/technique...phingMoon.html

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