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nitr0uzv
06-19-2005, 06:35 PM
I was wondering if anyone had a technique for shooting at night holding the camera and not using a tripod

right now im using 1/30, 2.7F, No zoom, iso 100

Please post some exif

emalvick
06-20-2005, 09:17 AM
How well is that working for you?

I can't post specific details as my experience varies from shot, and I have a Panasonic FZ15, which is a bit different.

I have found that at the exposure you discuss that I can get sharp results at 1/30, f2.8, and ISO 100. However, that only really works if there is a decent amount of light, and it depends on the subject.

I was at an indoor graduation last week. Holding the camera too my eye (using the viewfinder), and stabilizing myself against a rail in front of me, I was able to hand hold down to 1/15 consistently (f2.8, Iso 200). My exposures were ok. However, because the graduates were moving, the images sometimes were blurry.

I could go to 1/30 or faster, but the images need some serious correcting for brightness and noise becomes and issue. The same holds for using ISO 400, although the post processing for brightness is a bit less. I'm using the image stabilization on those shots, and my zoom was at 12X. Things were a bit better when zoomed out.

I often brace my camera against something (or I brace myself when I can't brace the camera) when the shutter speed gets slow, and even at 1X zoom, I think 1/10 is pushing it (with image stabilization). Without image stabilization, 1/50 is about as slow as I can go without blur.

I'd be interested in hearing what others think. I don't think there is a whole lot of difference between the Cannon and Panasonic in terms of this type of performance, which is why I responded. Both cameras have high zoom and image stabilizers.

Erik

John_Reed
06-20-2005, 12:39 PM
I was wondering if anyone had a technique for shooting at night holding the camera and not using a tripod

right now im using 1/30, 2.7F, No zoom, iso 100

Please post some exif1/30 is about right for concert photos where the subject is fairly well lit. In such cases, the IS system should be able to help you get decent shots, provided your subject holds still for the instant you're shooting. I've taken "night shots," where the shutter speed was 1 second or slower, but generally some bracing is needed, or putting the camera on a stable surface, or something like that. Here's an extreme example, (FZ10) where I was leaning hard against a post, handheld at 5 seconds:
http://john-reed.smugmug.com/photos/5798533-M.jpg

emalvick
06-20-2005, 03:02 PM
John, that's impressive. I don't even think my cheap tripod is stable enough to give me a 5 s exposure as sharp as what you showed there. You had the camera in your hands? or was it braced against something?

My hands are no where near that steady. I usually hold the camera against something, although I still couldn't get a 5 s shot like that. Good job.

Erik

John_Reed
06-20-2005, 04:10 PM
John, that's impressive. I don't even think my cheap tripod is stable enough to give me a 5 s exposure as sharp as what you showed there. You had the camera in your hands? or was it braced against something?

My hands are no where near that steady. I usually hold the camera against something, although I still couldn't get a 5 s shot like that. Good job.

Erik...against a post. There was no good surface around to support the camera, so I just closed my eyes, set the "2 second" timer, and squeezed the post. I shot about 4 successive shots, and this one came out OK. Glad you liked it.

nitr0uzv
06-20-2005, 07:33 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v395/nitr0uzv/IMG_0825.jpg


I dont even know how i made little stars out of those street lamps is it because of high aperture? cause the aperture is at 8 iso 50 sigh... im tired

nitr0uzv
06-20-2005, 07:35 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v395/nitr0uzv/IMG_0820.jpg


ok f3.5, shutter speed 4 seconds, tripod, iso 50

nitr0uzv
06-20-2005, 07:44 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v395/nitr0uzv/IMG_0833.jpg

Iso100 is much better except I see noise

can anyone help me improve this photo but the settings on my camera?

D Thompson
06-20-2005, 08:17 PM
Here's an extreme example, (FZ10) where I was leaning hard against a post, handheld at 5 seconds:
John - WOW, 5 seconds! You must be steady as a rock. I could never pull that shot off handheld, not even 2 seconds with a short lens.

Dennis

John_Reed
06-20-2005, 08:38 PM
I dont even know how i made little stars out of those street lamps is it because of high aperture? cause the aperture is at 8 iso 50 sigh... im tiredWhich is the shape of out-of-focus circles of light, in this case taking the shape of the 6-bladed diaphragm of your camera, the "stars" in your photo.

John_Reed
06-20-2005, 09:10 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v395/nitr0uzv/IMG_0833.jpg

Iso100 is much better except I see noise

can anyone help me improve this photo but the settings on my camera?The exposure is pretty good, but the composition, in my opinion, is cluttered, particularly by the two cars in the lower left foreground. Maybe you could try it again? Also try rotating the camera to make the pole vertical, always a nice plus for the eyeball!

speaklightly
06-21-2005, 05:34 AM
John-

As a long time Concert and Theater Photographer, rather used to slow shutter speeds, your 5 second, hand held shot is amazing. Congratulations.

You know it was dealing with my FZ's pushed to their absolute max, that drove me into the dSLR world. Things become much more civilized, and a god deal easier, when you have ISO 1600 and 3200 in your bag of tricks.

Sarah Joyce

John_Reed
06-21-2005, 08:08 AM
Another nice shot, Sarah Joyce, and you didn't even do it with your Fuji F10. It took a Canon 20D to approximate the F10's quality? ;)

speaklightly
06-22-2005, 08:11 AM
John-

Yes! And that Fuji F-10 only costs around $300 as oppossed to about $1,500 for the Canon 20D.

Sarah Joyce

clinger
06-23-2005, 09:49 AM
nitrOusv,

I'm only a novice myself but I find there are 1 or 2 techniques that help in allowing you to slow down your shutter speed. The first is probably very obvious - your stance. If it's not feasible to lean or brace yourself against something, make sure you're comfortable and have your arms tucked into your sides. Secondly, if you can, hold your breath for the duration of the shot. Also, I find that using the viewfinder rather than the lcd monitor gives that much extra support.
I hope my pennies worth of advice is of some help.

speaklightly
06-23-2005, 10:43 AM
Clinger-

Thanks for putting into this thread what I have been teaching for years. There is one more thing, short of a tripod that can be used as well: a monopod. It is a very effective accessory and takes uplittle packing room in a suitcase.

Sarah Joyce