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View Full Version : Need some help please!!



Emma
07-07-2004, 03:06 PM
Hi everyone, I'm after a pretty good quality camera... I've only have one digital camera before, but it was a crappy cheap one. I now have 500.00 ($930.00) to spend on a new one for christmas, but you see, I'm really not sure which one to get =/ I'm 15 and considering doing photography at college next year, so I really want something good enough for if I do decide to do it, just to get me started off. I was leaning towards the Nikon Coolpix 8700? but I'm really not sure
so any reccomendations or views on the Nikion coolpix 8700 would be great :)

Nick
07-07-2004, 03:13 PM
Well, you can make a few choices and I have a few things in mind for you. I'll ask you something first: is 900 the total you have, or just for the camera? You can get something very decent, for say, 650, and have quite a bit left over - for filters, memory, tripod, bag, etc. If that is the case :)

Emma
07-07-2004, 03:15 PM
well, my overall total is probably going to be around $1,112.00

John_Reed
07-07-2004, 03:41 PM
Hi everyone, I'm after a pretty good quality camera... I've only have one digital camera before, but it was a crappy cheap one. I now have 500.00 ($930.00) to spend on a new one for christmas, but you see, I'm really not sure which one to get =/ I'm 15 and considering doing photography at college next year, so I really want something good enough for if I do decide to do it, just to get me started off. I was leaning towards the Nikon Coolpix 8700? but I'm really not sure
so any reccomendations or views on the Nikion coolpix 8700 would be great :)
Emma, you didn't tell us what kind of photography you're going to be doing when you "do photography" at college; maybe the 8700 would be best, maybe there would be better alternatives. Can you be more specific? For example, do you plan to print large prints (8X10 or bigger) or mainly post photos on the Web? Indoor shots? Outdoor shots? A little more info, please?

Emma
07-07-2004, 03:49 PM
Emma, you didn't tell us what kind of photography you're going to be doing when you "do photography" at college; maybe the 8700 would be best, maybe there would be better alternatives. Can you be more specific? For example, do you plan to print large prints (8X10 or bigger) or mainly post photos on the Web? Indoor shots? Outdoor shots? A little more info, please?

sorry, I didn't really know what infomation I needed to put :s
Kind of photography is Scenery - but I also want something with a good zoom for taking pictures of animals, at zoos, birds etc. I don't plan on printing prints bigger than 8X10 ^^;; and because I want to do Scenery I'll be using the camera mostly outdoors

JDR7171988
07-07-2004, 04:05 PM
Get the Canon Pro 1. I handled it at Best Buy yesterday, and all I can say is that camera is the coolest ever. Damnit, someone give me an extra 400 bucks so I can get one too.

John_Reed
07-07-2004, 04:12 PM
For good zooming on outdoor scenery, birds, zoos, etc., you'll have a hard time bettering the performance of the Panasonic DMC-FZ10, which is selling now for ~$500, and has a Leica lens whose performance and zoom range are better than the 8700's, in addition to image stabilization. I have one, and I love it! Check it out via reviews on this forum, for one place.

Nick
07-07-2004, 04:22 PM
Get the Canon Pro 1. I handled it at Best Buy yesterday, and all I can say is that camera is the coolest ever. Damnit, someone give me an extra 400 bucks so I can get one too.

And that while it focuses, the EVF freezes when it locks focus, and you have to guess where your subject is? I tried one for a day or so for action photography, and it was really quite a bother to me.

D70FAN
07-07-2004, 10:00 PM
Since you are looking for a camera to use for a photography class, and to last you for several years to come, you should probably look at the Canon Digital Rebel. With a decent (included) lens it runs about $900. I would recommend against most of the 8MP all-in-ones as poor investments.

At least with a dSLR like the dReb you are going in with a high quality still-camera that works and acts like a good film SLR. It will allow you to learn what all of the "jargon" means with instant feedback in terms of picture quality. For a few dollars more ($400) you might also want to look at the Nikon D70, as it is closer to a professional dSLR in form and function.

Either way, a dSLR is probably your best learning tool for still photography.