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print-digital
06-13-2005, 03:11 AM
I have a few questions about filters, probably a little basic I know - but before I spend I want to be sure :)

If I own a 18mm - 55mm lens on a Canon 300D, would I need to get a 55mm thread filter? I went into a camera shop at the weekend and had conflicting advice and now doubt what the people were telling me!

If and when I upgrade (I am planning to get the SIGMA 70-300 mm f/4-5.6) will a 55mm thread filter still fit it?

I have heard alot about Hoya filters, are these thought to be the best currently?

Also what are the benefits of a linear and a circular polarizer - this is another question that they could not answer and now I need some good advice.

Hope some one can help, thanks :)

Chucko
06-13-2005, 08:50 AM
The markings on the front of the lens should include the filter diameter. It is extremely unlikely to be the same as the focal length of the lens. Ask someone at a GOOD camera shop or lab (not Ritz, Wolf, Comp USA, Best Buy, etc.) if you are unsure.

Sometimes camera makers will standardize on a couple of diameters, but as time passes, they may change which are the "common" diameters. (Ask any collector of Canon FD lenses!) When you buy 3rd party lenses, there is no standardization. So prepare to buy a number of filters.

Linear polarizers are only useful on cameras that do not have partially silvered mirrors. Many SLRs use partially silvered mirrors to divert light to metering sensors; a linear polarizer on such a camera will cause exposure metering to be inconsistent and likely incorrect.

Circular polarizers will work on all cameras. They are specifically designed to work correctly with partially silvered mirrors. They're more expensive than linear polarizers.

Cold Snail
06-13-2005, 09:28 AM
The Sigma mentioned takes a 58mm filter, I'm not sure about your kit lens though.

In my limited experience, all the filters needed are a UV or Skylight (to protect the lens in dusty conditions), a polariser (for beating reflections) and some graduated greys/natural densities (to stop skies blowing out). The rest you can do in Photoshop.

print-digital
06-21-2005, 12:40 PM
At the weekend I am going to my sisters wedding and hoping to take some good pictures - due to being really busy the last week or so I still have not got a selection of filters :(

Does anyone have any good advice for taking pictures in strong sun light (thats what the weather man said anyway) outside.

A good filter would stop the skies blowing out I know, but with out a filter is there anything else I can do, still knew to the DSLR side of digital photography :o

Thanks for your help :cool:

emalvick
06-21-2005, 12:57 PM
At the weekend I am going to my sisters wedding and hoping to take some good pictures - due to being really busy the last week or so I still have not got a selection of filters :(

Does anyone have any good advice for taking pictures in strong sun light (thats what the weather man said anyway) outside.

A good filter would stop the skies blowing out I know, but with out a filter is there anything else I can do, still knew to the DSLR side of digital photography :o

Thanks for your help :cool:

One suggestion I have is to take a few minutes and go to a Ritz camera or something similar and just buy yourself a polarizer. You don't have to buy the best polarizer to get good results. It'll help with any glare that may be present, and it'll help darken the sky a bit.

Another suggestion is to get yourself a hood. That'll help shade the lens and stop lens flare. You can probably even make a temporary one out of a paper or plastic cup. Just make sure you get it dark colored so it doesn't reflect light into your lens.

I also suggest taking some practice shots in conditions that you think will be similar to the wedding conditions: bright sky, etc... Try to figure out what settings will be good and which won't. Usually when I am taking photos of people at events, etc, I don't worry too much about blowing the sky out. I try not too let it blow out, but ultimately, it is the people who count. They are what the image is about.

Try to have fun, have lots of memory available, and don't be afraid to take too many photos and to use bracketing or rapid exposures.

Erik

speaklightly
06-22-2005, 08:07 AM
Print-Digital-

Many years ago when I was doing weddings myself in bright sunlight, I would often use a tiny bit of underexposure to compensate for the high contrast/over exposure potential potential caused by the bride's gown. After all, under exposure is easier to deal with than over exposure.

Sarah Joyce

print-digital
06-22-2005, 08:54 AM
Thanks for the advice both of you :)

print-digital
06-29-2005, 08:28 AM
www.creativeconfusion.net/kellys-wedding/

This is how they turned out, a little compression to keep the file sizes down so some seem a little blurred and fuzzy.