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gabo234
06-06-2005, 06:37 PM
Hey guys and gals,
I'm a real newbie, but I guess if I don't ask, I'll never learn. I'm wondering what the different ISO settings are used for and in what situations do they make a difference. To my understanding, the ISO setting changes the sensors sensitivity...please correct me if I'm wrong. Anways, I always see that the higher the ISO is set at, the noisier the image gets...well I was just wondering how exactly to use the different ISO settings to my advantage, and when to use manually set them...any help is appreciated.

David Metsky
06-06-2005, 06:47 PM
Higher sensitivity allows you to shoot in lower light, at the expense of noise.

-dave-

g0tr00t
06-07-2005, 06:39 AM
I am a low light junkie. I always advise to experiment shooting at high ISO's and let the noise work for you.

I recently shot 40 rolls of B&W, developed them at home and printed 8x10's. To my surprise, the film grain was in excess of digital noise on my digital camera's at ISO 400. LOL....

I now use the noise to work for me rather than becoming a pixel peeper and trying to smooth out the image.

Good luck!

John_Reed
06-07-2005, 07:03 AM
Hey guys and gals,
I'm a real newbie, but I guess if I don't ask, I'll never learn. I'm wondering what the different ISO settings are used for and in what situations do they make a difference. To my understanding, the ISO setting changes the sensors sensitivity...please correct me if I'm wrong. Anways, I always see that the higher the ISO is set at, the noisier the image gets...well I was just wondering how exactly to use the different ISO settings to my advantage, and when to use manually set them...any help is appreciated.As David said, raising the ISO lets you speed up the shutter in low light conditions, allowing you to perhaps capture an action shot more sharply than you would have been able to at a slower shutter speed. For example, if your camera is shooting a particular scene at ISO 100, 1/25 of a second (pretty slow shutter, maybe you need a tripod?), raising the ISO to 400 would let you shoot the same scene at 1/100 of a second, 4X faster. When high-ISO noise appears, it generally shows up in the shadows of your shots, and like g0tr00t says, that may work to your advantage with the overall artistry of the photo.

g0tr00t
06-07-2005, 08:03 AM
Another point I failed to mention, is if you shoot in manual mode & high ISO, you can always push the histogram slightly to the right (+3 EV) and pull it back some in Photoshop.

I have done this technique and was pleasantly surprised. Then again, you risk blowouts in your scene. So with anything, experiment to your flavor.

:D

gabo234
06-07-2005, 12:57 PM
Cool cool guys, thanks a lot...I'm really enjoying this camera and am having a good time learning all these different things I never knew before. Thanks to everyone here...

gabo234
06-10-2005, 10:45 PM
Hey,
I was trying out the different ISO settings today, just shooting snaps of my brother relaxin watching TV, and I used no flash, but the higher ISO settings stayed pretty blurry...am I still doing something wrong? Am I wrong in thinking that if I turn up the ISO the shot with less light should come out more crisp?

David Metsky
06-11-2005, 07:48 AM
Hey,
I was trying out the different ISO settings today, just shooting snaps of my brother relaxin watching TV, and I used no flash, but the higher ISO settings stayed pretty blurry...am I still doing something wrong? Am I wrong in thinking that if I turn up the ISO the shot with less light should come out more crisp?
The should allow you to shoot with a faster shutter speed, but it may not be enough of a faster shutter speed to freeze your hand motion. You should also work on learning how to brace yourself to keep your camera from moving while taking shots.

Some ideas:
- Always use the optical viewfinder with the camera braced against your eye
- Lean against something, like a door jam
- Use the 2 sec delay so you don't get movement from pressing the shutter button

Look at the EXIM data and see what shutter speed the camera is choosing for you shots. It's pretty hard to hand hold at slower than 1/60th but it can be done. You may simply not have enough light in that scene.

-dave-

John_Reed
06-11-2005, 09:15 AM
Hey,
I was trying out the different ISO settings today, just shooting snaps of my brother relaxin watching TV, and I used no flash, but the higher ISO settings stayed pretty blurry...am I still doing something wrong? Am I wrong in thinking that if I turn up the ISO the shot with less light should come out more crisp?...the basic one being, if either the shooter or the subject moves while the camera's shutter is open, the captured image will be blurred. Cameras with image stabilizers or tripods help with shooter motion, but generally the less time you leave the shutter open, the sharper the photo will be. So high ISO helps reduce the "shutter open" time, wide-open aperture (like f2.8) helps by letting in the maximum light, and underexposure helps too, though it tends to darken your image, it can often be recovered in post-processing. But don't make the common mistake of thinking that "because it's digital, it's supposed to be sharp?"