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View Full Version : Suggested Upgrade for the DiMage 7i



yonco
09-04-2004, 07:07 AM
Hello,

My family has owned Minolta's DiMage 7i for a couple of years. My parents haven't used it much, and can't fully operate it due to their limited knowledge in photography, and so me and my brother were its main users. It's a fantastic camera, and I like it a lot. But I was just thinking about it the other day, that it's a discontinued model, so I was wondering what would be your suggestion for an upgrade. We have no intention to do so, but I'm just interested.
What's your most recommended SLR camera?

D70FAN
09-04-2004, 08:03 AM
Hello,

My family has owned Minolta's DiMage 7i for a couple of years. My parents haven't used it much, and can't fully operate it due to their limited knowledge in photography, and so me and my brother were its main users. It's a fantastic camera, and I like it a lot. But I was just thinking about it the other day, that it's a discontinued model, so I was wondering what would be your suggestion for an upgrade. We have no intention to do so, but I'm just interested.
What's your most recommended SLR camera?

All of the recent crop of consumer dSLR's are good. Starting with the Canon EOS 300D Digital Rebel, and the Nikon D70. Both are 6.1 Mega Pixel using larger APS-C sized sensors. The DReb is the least expensive at about $1000 with an 18-55mm zoom. The D70 has more features and is a little more solid for about $1300 with an 18-70mm zoom.

There are several semi-pro dSLR's in the $1500 range (body only) like the Pentax *istD, but with the most notable being the new Canon 20D.

From there we hit the ~$2000 range (body only) with the Sigma SD10, and the Fuji S2 Pro, and then head up into the pro cameras from Nikon, Canon , and Kodak, with the top of the line being around $8000 (Body Only) for the Canon 1Ds.

Beyond that are the large format digital-backs from Phase One and Fuji for cameras like Haselblad that run 16MP to 22MP with a price tag of $16,000 to $25,000 not including the cameras.

That's it in a nutshell.

yonco
09-04-2004, 08:11 AM
All of the recent crop of consumer dSLR's are good. Starting with the Canon EOS 300D Digital Rebel, and the Nikon D70. Both are 6.1 Mega Pixel using larger APS-C sized sensors. The DReb is the least expensive at about $1000 with an 18-55mm zoom. The D70 has more features and is a little more solid for about $1300 with an 18-70mm zoom.

There are several semi-pro dSLR's in the $1500 range including the body like the Pentax *istD, but with the most notable being the new Canon 20D.

From there we hit the $2000 range (body only) with the Sigma SD10, and the Fuji S2 Pro, and then head up into the pro cameras from Nikon, Canon , and Kodak, with the top of the line being around $8000 (Body Only) for the Canon 1Ds.

That's it in a nutshell.
Thanks for your answer! I appreciate your help.
The Nikon D70 sounds good according to some reviews I've read. But it's all out of curiousity. We have no intention to buy a new camera, though I would love to have one.
As a beginner in photography, I'd love to have an explanation of the term APS-C. I've also read somewhere about APS-sized sensors. What does that mean? I have no clue... :(

erichlund
09-04-2004, 11:04 AM
Well, I can't give a real technical description, but here's a for example to give you an idea.

My D70 sensor is about 24 x 16 mm with about 6 mega pixels in that space. My wife's S60 has a 7 x 5 mm sensor that crams 5 mega pixels into that much smaller space. I would naturally expect the larger sensor to be able to convert the analog focused light image to discrete digital with less tendency for the individual pixels to be affected by light hitting the adjacent pixels. I'm sure there is a lot more to the issue than that, but basically it comes down to bigger, more capable sensor, with more and better controlling electronics.

Cheers,
Eric