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View Full Version : Question - How to get indoor shots brighter?



dbroncos
09-03-2004, 05:28 AM
I need some help here. I own a Fujifilm Finepix 2600z 2.0 megapixel camera that I bought new a couple years ago. Overall, I am happy with the performance. But whenever I take indoor photos with the flash on, (or in auto) the subject looks good, but the backround is very dark. I can not take these photos with the flash off, because then the photo is blurry. I can not simply get better lighting, because all my lights are on, and to be honest, it should be plenty of light. Is there anything that can be done? Would a new camera fix the problem? I love my digital camera, but before digital, I never had this problem. Is this just something that can not be fixed? Please help me!

jaykinghorn
09-03-2004, 09:12 AM
You're running into a couple different problems. Our eye is able to adapt to a huge range of brightness values. Our cameras, however, cannot. In a typical room, the ambient light is much too low for cameras to effectively record the scene. So, you become relient upon extremely slow shutter speeds, or the necessity for extra light-usually in the form of a flash.

It sounds like your light is effectively illuminating the subject, and your camera's TTL metering is working effectively. It sounds to me like your flash is overpowering the ambient light in the room. Does your camera have a "fill flash" setting? Are you able to shoot the camera in manual mode? If so, I like to turn the flash off for one exposure and manually set the exposure for the ambient lights at 1 1/3- 1 1/2 stops underexposure. Then, turn on the flash and balance the output of the flash to illuminate the subject.

You may not have all these options available on your camera. If you don't have the options for manual exposure, you may want to try using a night or low-light preset. Keep experimenting.

Good luck.

Jay Kinghorn
RGB Imaging

D70FAN
09-03-2004, 09:43 AM
You're running into a couple different problems. Our eye is able to adapt to a huge range of brightness values. Our cameras, however, cannot. In a typical room, the ambient light is much too low for cameras to effectively record the scene. So, you become relient upon extremely slow shutter speeds, or the necessity for extra light-usually in the form of a flash.

It sounds like your light is effectively illuminating the subject, and your camera's TTL metering is working effectively. It sounds to me like your flash is overpowering the ambient light in the room. Does your camera have a "fill flash" setting? Are you able to shoot the camera in manual mode? If so, I like to turn the flash off for one exposure and manually set the exposure for the ambient lights at 1 1/3- 1 1/2 stops underexposure. Then, turn on the flash and balance the output of the flash to illuminate the subject.

You may not have all these options available on your camera. If you don't have the options for manual exposure, you may want to try using a night or low-light preset. Keep experimenting.

Good luck.

Jay Kinghorn
RGB Imaging

Jay,

The Fuji 2600 is a fairly old point-n-shoot with no manual controls, except EV comp., and ISO fixed at 100.

dbroncos,

Outside of setting up supplemental lighting I'm afraid that you are in need of a new camera.

I suggest you take a look at the Canon A75 as a possible, low cost (about the same as the 2600 when new), but high featured, replacement. For about $250 (list)you can save your sanity as well.

The good news is that the Canon uses AA rechargables (just like your 2600 except it uses 4 instead of 2), and low cost Compact Flash memory cards. The bad news is that you will have to retire those (now obsolete anyway) Smart Media cards.