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wookie
05-16-2005, 11:06 AM
My girlfriend owns a canon EOS Elan II 35mm SLR and canon 28-80mm lens. I've been messing around with it more and more and decided to get a digital SLR so we can have two cameras. I ended up going with a used canon D30 bought on ebay.

Now I'm looking around at lenses. My first question, are EOS lenses and EF lenses the same thing? The specs I read on the D30 say it is compatible with all EF mount lenses. I read one website suggestion they were the same thing, and there are a lot more lenses listed online as EOS rather than EF. Just trying to make sure that I'm looking at the right types of lenses.

Also, does anyone have any recommendations for or against 3rd party lens manufacturers? I've been looking at getting either a second 28-80mm, a faster 28-70mm, or a 50mm f/1.8 prime lens. Besides Canon, there's some models by Sigma and Tamron. Are these (occasionally) cheaper brands passable for someone just getting started, or are they not worth it?

Thanks for any advice you can pass along!

D70FAN
05-16-2005, 03:51 PM
My girlfriend owns a canon EOS Elan II 35mm SLR and canon 28-80mm lens. I've been messing around with it more and more and decided to get a digital SLR so we can have two cameras. I ended up going with a used canon D30 bought on ebay.

Now I'm looking around at lenses. My first question, are EOS lenses and EF lenses the same thing? The specs I read on the D30 say it is compatible with all EF mount lenses. I read one website suggestion they were the same thing, and there are a lot more lenses listed online as EOS rather than EF. Just trying to make sure that I'm looking at the right types of lenses.

Also, does anyone have any recommendations for or against 3rd party lens manufacturers? I've been looking at getting either a second 28-80mm, a faster 28-70mm, or a 50mm f/1.8 prime lens. Besides Canon, there's some models by Sigma and Tamron. Are these (occasionally) cheaper brands passable for someone just getting started, or are they not worth it?

Thanks for any advice you can pass along!

If I'm not mistaken EOS lenses are the consumer grade and EF are higher grade.

There are a lot of very good 3rd party lenses out there from Sigma, Tamron, and Tokina.

For an everyday lens, many of us are using the Sigma 18-125 DC (about $270) with good success. In the 28-75 catagory the Tamron 28-75 f2.8 is getting some pretty rave reviews and the examples shown on DCRP have been great (about $400).

For high ratio, long zooms, the Sigma 18-200 is looking pretty good (around $400). For smaller ratio long zoom the Sigma 70-300 APO seems to be pretty decent as well ($250).

For a stabilized long zoom Sigma makes an 80-400 OS for about $1000.

And of course for a general purpose fixed lens the Canon 50mm f1.8 is a must.

In addition Canon makes some great lenses in their ES "L" series. I'm sure that one of our Canon members is more familiar with those than I am, so I'll open the floor to their expertise.

cwphoto
05-16-2005, 04:57 PM
Most Canon lenses designed for the EOS system are designated EF.

EF stands for Electro-Focus. All Canon EOS cameras will accept EF lenses.

Other lenses designed for the EOS system include those labelled TS-E (three lenses; a 24mm, 45mm, and 90mm) and MP-E (one lens; a 65mm 1-5x Macro). These lenses are all manual focus and designed for special purposes. They can be used on all EOS cameras.

Additionally, there are lenses labelled EF-S that are designed only for their entry and mid level digital SLRs (300D/Digital Rebel/Kiss Digital, 350D/Digital Rebel XT/Kiss Digital N, D30, D60, 10D, 20D).

The EF-S lenses have a smaller image circle and are unsuitable for all of Canon's EOS film SLRs and the professional digital SLRs (such as 1D, 1D Mark II, 1Ds, 1Ds Mark II, D6000, D2000, DCS1, DCS3). EF-S lenses exist mainly to bring wide-angle photography to entry and mid level Canon digital SLR users that is otherwise unavailable due to their 1.6x sensor size ratio.

Older Canon SLRs (mainly manual focus with the exception of the T80) use a lens mount designated FD. Prior to this was the FL, R, and S mounts

Complicating things more, FD lenses may be connected to an EOS via an FD-EOS Converter (there's also a macro version). Although these days you really wouldn't bother unless you came across a cheap FD lens (maybe a telephoto?) that you were happy to manually focus.

Canon markets their best lenses under the "L" designation (the lenses with the red stripe). A tradition that dates back to the FD era and also crosses over to the non-SLR range (Pro-1). "L" stands for Luxury.

If someone is advertising an "EOS" lens, they probably mean EF.

jamison55
05-16-2005, 06:33 PM
Additionally, there are lenses labelled EF-S that are designed only for their entry and mid level digital SLRs (300D/Digital Rebel/Kiss Digital, 350D/Digital Rebel XT/Kiss Digital N, D30, D60, 10D, 20D).


Wookie, congrats on your new D30! You were looking for a meaty camera...

Excellent and thorough explanation, cwphoto. Be careful, though...only the DReb and 20D can use EF-S lenses. Even though the other models (D30, D60, 10D) have a small enough sensor, their mirror is too large for the EF-S mount and will catch on the back of the lens, potentially causing damage.

EF vs EOS has nothing to do with the quality of the lens. EF is simply the designation that Canon gives to lenses that work with the EOS system of cameras lenses and flashes...

You can't go wrong with George's recommendation of the 50 f1.8. You won't find a sharper lens anywhere for $70. If you must have a zoom (and are worried about price - as your original post indicated), Sigma has a pretty good low cost kit that contains an 18-50 and 55-200 (look for it on EBay...). I have also heard good things about the Tokina 19-35 if wide is your thing ($169 on Adorama). And George's recommdation of the Sigma 18-125 is also a great choice...folks seem to rave about this lens for $250. You are actually buying the camera at a great time in digital SLR optics. In 2000 when the D30 was originally sold, they hadn't begun optimizing low cost lenses for digital cameras so there were a lot more optical defects seen...

cwphoto
05-16-2005, 07:14 PM
Excellent and thorough explanation, jeisner. Be careful, though...only the DReb and 20D can use EF-S lenses. Even though the other models (D30, D60, 10D) have a small enough sensor, their mirror is too large for the EF-S mount and will catch on the back of the lens, potentially causing damage.


Thanks for the clarification Jamison, I overlooked that...

jeisner
05-16-2005, 07:34 PM
Excellent and thorough explanation, jeisner.

Thanks for the credit but it wasn't me :D

D70FAN
05-16-2005, 09:31 PM
Wookie, congrats on your new D30! You were looking for a meaty camera...

Excellent and thorough explanation, jeisner. Be careful, though...only the DReb and 20D can use EF-S lenses. Even though the other models (D30, D60, 10D) have a small enough sensor, their mirror is too large for the EF-S mount and will catch on the back of the lens, potentially causing damage.

EF vs EOS has nothing to do with the quality of the lens. EF is simply the designation that Canon gives to lenses that work with the EOS system of cameras lenses and flashes...



Thanks for the clarification. I just always associated EOS with Canon consumer equipment.

Guess not.

jamison55
05-17-2005, 04:12 AM
Sorry about the mixup :o

CWPhoto, your post on lenses was excellent and informative.