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View Full Version : UV/Polarizer Filter Comparison



Bluedog
05-05-2005, 08:17 PM
Found this over @ PBase a member posted:

http://www.pbase.com/jpeper/image/32267513/original.jpg

jeisner
05-05-2005, 08:31 PM
I like the last with maximum polarisation and in second place the original with nothing on it...

The UV filter has little place in the digital world, other than for protection, and it does reduce light levels, although in this case it seems to rob the sky of some colour, at least on my monitor (LCD at work isn't exatly true though)...

It would have been nice to see some 100% crops of the trees too, just to see how much resolution/detail was lost to the different filters...

Bluedog
05-05-2005, 08:56 PM
I've got a ViewSonic VP171b Pro Series LCD hooked up digital through my Nvidia 6800GT Video Card that is better than just about any CRT: That I have seen.

In that image the water color is lost using the UV filter but the Sky retains a slightly bluer cast. Kinda makes up my mind considering buying UV filters ... make mental note to keep lens cap handy.
Here's the PBase Gallery with crops: You can click on the Originals for full image resolution ... dial up modem warning though (http://www.pbase.com/jpeper/filter_compare)

jeisner
05-05-2005, 09:01 PM
I have dual 17" but they are just cheap dell monitors... :-(

aparmley
05-06-2005, 07:19 AM
I prefer the sky in the last one and the water and trees in the first picture with nothing...LOL

Mr. Peabody
05-06-2005, 08:27 PM
Water looks best in #1

Sky looks best in #4

Trees look best in #4

I have a UV filter on all my lenses for protection.

I asked a guy at my local expert camera shop about them. I mentioned the fact that someone told me that I should use a UV Filter not only for protection but because cleaning my actual lens will ruin or rub off the coating on it. He said that was complete bull. He said that wiping your lense with a micro lense towel isn't going to ruin your lense.

I'm torn at what to do at this point. I want to take off all my UV filters and trash them, but at the same time I don't.

Bluedog
05-06-2005, 08:36 PM
Well image #2 is enough to keep me from spending money on them.

The guy was right too. I keep a small bottle lens cleaner, tissue paper and lent free cloth in my bag.

TheObiJuan
05-06-2005, 08:40 PM
Water looks best in #1

Sky looks best in #4

Trees look best in #4

I have a UV filter on all my lenses for protection.

I asked a guy at my local expert camera shop about them. I mentioned the fact that someone told me that I should use a UV Filter not only for protection but because cleaning my actual lens will ruin or rub off the coating on it. He said that was complete bull. He said that wiping your lense with a micro lense towel isn't going to ruin your lense.

I'm torn at what to do at this point. I want to take off all my UV filters and trash them, but at the same time I don't.


I keep mine on so I dont have to be careful and clean my front element, and the UV filter has proven to protect my lens from incoming paintballs. :eek:

I would much rather have straight glass with no filtering though.

TheObiJuan
05-06-2005, 08:40 PM
Well image #2 is enough to keep me from spending money on them.

The guy was right too. I keep a small bottle lens cleaner, tissue paper and lent free cloth in my bag.

not all filters are the same. I have a few filters and will run some tests to see which produce what colors.

Bluedog
05-06-2005, 08:47 PM
Obijuan your situation is kinda unique so a UV would be highly recommend for protection. Heck I'd even be concerned about the function buttons getting fouled up with a paint ball splatter.

TheObiJuan
05-06-2005, 08:52 PM
Obijuan your situation is kinda unique so a UV would be highly recommend for protection. Heck I'd even be concerned about the function buttons getting fouled up with a paint ball splatter.

wildlife photogs have to worry about branches and brush scraping elements too. There are many reasons to protect the front elements. But the average shooter doesn't. I don't mind using my shirt to gently brush away dust on my cheap filter, but I wouldn't dare do it on my lens. I do carry a microcloth in my domke bag, but it is a pain to get out all the time, that is IF I didn't have the filter protecting the lens.

TheObiJuan
05-06-2005, 09:18 PM
To each their own. Try a soft camelhair artist or makup brush. Works on the whole camera. Helps prevent dust intrusion as well. I keep one in my pocket when I'm shooting.

Nothing helps a good lens shoot bad pictures like another piece of filter glass stuck in front of it.

I agree with your assertion, and I use them only when outdoors. Indoors there is no need for them. I like your idea about the brush, thanks. I will be sure to pick one up.

Mr. Peabody
05-06-2005, 09:42 PM
That does it. I'm taking off my UV Filters tomorrow.

Bluedog
05-07-2005, 06:08 AM
That does it. I'm taking off my UV Filters tomorrow.

The main thing is to treat the equipment with respect to what you paid for it. If I'm not using the camera taking pictures the lens cap goes on (takes 2 seconds at most) or either the Lens Hood is attached and it goes into the camera bag while not taking pictures.

jeisner
05-07-2005, 06:19 AM
The main thing is to treat the equipment with respect to what you paid for it. If I'm not using the camera taking pictures the lens cap goes on (takes 2 seconds at most) or either the Lens Hood is attached and it goes into the camera bag while not taking pictures.

I don't use UV filters day to day, but I have a few in the cupboard and if I am going to shoot down the beach for example esp if a rough coast (lot of salt spray) I will put one on the lenses I intend to use...

Bluedog
05-07-2005, 09:48 PM
I read this article a while back and finally found it again: The Filter Flare Factor by Mike Johnston (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/sm-feb-05.shtml)