PDA

View Full Version : Which lens do i buy?



_Angel_
04-28-2005, 08:25 AM
I will be purchasing a Canon 350D soon and am looking for a lens with a decent magnification. I am very much a newbie in the whole photography thing and all these different lenses most certainly have me confused. In order to get the equivalent of a 10x zoom or more...which lens should i look at?

Balrog
04-28-2005, 08:52 AM
Sigma recently released an 18-200mm (about an 11X) lens for about $400, it's been getting good reviews.

D70FAN
04-28-2005, 12:21 PM
I will be purchasing a Canon 350D soon and am looking for a lens with a decent magnification. I am very much a newbie in the whole photography thing and all these different lenses most certainly have me confused. In order to get the equivalent of a 10x zoom or more...which lens should i look at?

To my memory (and now thanks to others) there are six lenses at 10X zoom or greater.

Tamron or Sigma 18-200 (~$400)
Tamron 28-300 (~$400)
Sigma 50-500 (~$1000).
Canon EF 35-350 L (~$1500) Thanks Juan.
Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS (~$2200) Thanks Rex

Of these the Sigma 18-200 seems to be the one to investigate as a day-to-day lens. From initial reviews it appears to be a better the Tamron. Here is Juans reposting of the comparison on this thread.

http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7524

The Tamron 28-300 is basically an earlier (and arguably better) version of the Tamron 18-200. This lens was originally designed for film cameras so with the 1.6 crop factor of the XT it will have the same wide angle as a 45mm lens (probably not good for day-to-day use). Again, this lens will work fine on digital cameras, but don't expect to take many indoor pictures.

The 50-500 is designed as a super-tele lens for nature photography. In this case the equvalent (1.6 crop) range is now 80-800mm. Not bad for $1000.

If you want a big telephoto with image stabilization, then Sigma also makes a 5X "image stabilized" 80-400mm (XT equivalent=128-640). so if you are thinking long telephoto and need image stabilization, then this might be a good alternative to the 50-500. If a tripod or monopos is part of your nature shooting plan then the 50-500 would be a good choice.

Either will set you back about $1000

For a lot less money and 100mm to 200mm shorter zoom range the Sigma 70-300 APO (not DL) will give the XT an equivalent to 112mm-480mm for under $250.

Probably a good starter kit would be the XT body with a Sigma 18-200 and a Canon 50mm f1.8. That should keep it simple, and be enough to learn 80% of what you need to know. Then you can go out and buy a few f2.8 wow lenses like the Tamron 28-75 f2.8, or the Sigma 70-200 f2.8.

Beyond that are a few super lenses from Canons pro "L" series, that may require a second job, or lottery win.

While this is not the definitive list of good lenses, it is at least a place to start. Evaluate the "starter kit" above. Unless you are planning to be a professional photographer, right away, it should meet your initial requirement.

TheObiJuan
04-28-2005, 12:47 PM
canon 35-350L
good luck finding ne though. ;)

Rex914
04-28-2005, 12:54 PM
Don't forget about Canon's nice 28-300 L IS. If you have the money and are willing to lug around a 3.7 pound lens, that's the best of the bunch in terms of pure quality (but not price).

D70FAN
04-28-2005, 12:58 PM
canon 35-350L
good luck finding ne though. ;)

Sorry I missed that one. You can order it from Norman Camera for $1500 + Shipping (and tax if you live in Michigan).

Thanks for adding another lens to the 10X+ list.

AllanMarcus
04-28-2005, 03:09 PM
This is a great site for canon users:

http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/reviews/

articles on lens choice, IS, and other topics. Bob Atkins runs the site and he seems very good.

I will probably get the 70-300 IS for $415. It's not "L" quality, but it's still a good lens for a P&S upgrade like me. Bob has a good articel on IS at

http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/tutorials/is2.html

D70FAN
04-28-2005, 03:24 PM
Don't forget about Canon's nice 28-300 L IS. If you have the money and are willing to lug around a 3.7 pound lens, that's the best of the bunch in terms of pure quality (but not price).

Noted, and edited/added to the original list...Thanks.

Rex914
04-28-2005, 03:39 PM
This is a great site for canon users:

http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/reviews/

articles on lens choice, IS, and other topics. Bob Atkins runs the site and he seems very good.

I will probably get the 70-300 IS for $415. It's not "L" quality, but it's still a good lens for a P&S upgrade like me. Bob has a good articel on IS at

http://www.bobatkins.com/photography/tutorials/is2.html

Really nice resource there. Reviews are detailed yet concise and to the point.