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View Full Version : dx6490- need both sport and night setting



natamiss
04-23-2005, 03:13 PM
I just love this camera, except I have been having a hard time when I am trying to take a picture of something in motion in a dark setting (a concert, sledding outside at night). If I set my camera at the sport setting, it's too dark even with the flash- if I set it at the night setting the picture has enough light, but is blurry. I'm new at this so maybe there is something I am doing wrong. Can anyone help?? Please!!!

BlueGrassGirl
04-24-2005, 03:09 PM
I have the same camera. It does not work as well in low light conditions as compared to some other cameras in the same price range. You should try working with the manual settings. I got some ok indoor circus shots even from far away with the flash on. You may also want to use a tripod at night. I havent really used mine outside but I will try it out and post something here to see if its a camera problem or not.

linncountysports
05-02-2005, 12:57 PM
I have this camera as well. I take alot of sports shots with it. When indoors I set my ISO to 800 and don't use flash. It seems to work best with this camera. You can view some of my shots at www.linncountysports.com All photos on there are taken with this camera.

PhilR.
05-02-2005, 03:50 PM
I just love this camera, except I have been having a hard time when I am trying to take a picture of something in motion in a dark setting (a concert, sledding outside at night). If I set my camera at the sport setting, it's too dark even with the flash- if I set it at the night setting the picture has enough light, but is blurry. I'm new at this so maybe there is something I am doing wrong. Can anyone help?? Please!!!

A camera has to have light in order to record an image. Sport setting forces the camera to use a high shutter speed (to capture fast moving objects), which will restrict the amount of light reaching the sensor. If there isn't enough light to begin with, then you will not get a good image. If you are using flash and are still getting underexposed pics, then your subjects are not within the flash range. Do you know what the flash range of your camera is?

Night setting forces the camera to do the opposite - open the shutter long enough to record a low-light image. Of course this will cause moving objects to blur. A tripod will help with long exposures, but will not help with freezing a moving subject.

A camera can only do so much with the amount of light you are in. The lower the light, the less it can do. This goes for all cameras. It is a simple fact of physics that low light will cause a decrease in shutter speed for any given aperture or ISO setting. The inability of a camera to make an adequate exposure in a situation for which it was not designed to work in is not a problem of the camera.

There are some things you can do to help minimize poor exposure. Use the highest ISO you can, which will help to maximize the shutter speed as much as possible. Use flash as well, in the auto mode, and pay attention to staying with the flash range. If you can't use the flash, then increase ISO, and then shoot in aperture priority mode and use the widest aperture you can, which will force the camera to use the highest shutter speed possible.

PhilR.