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Tm2005
04-20-2005, 09:33 AM
When I take photos in my apt of subjects, there is usually a shadow cast over the top of their head and shoulders in the photo. I'm assuming this has to do with the lighting and my camera built-in flash. Or possibly the angle of the shot. Are there any settings on the camera that I can adjust to reduce this? Or do I have to add more light to the room. thanks

BlueGrassGirl
04-20-2005, 09:47 AM
I am not a professional by any means but I have been learning a lot about this lately. I would suggest using available light and turn off your on camera flash. I think you could also get a higher powered external flash. Im not sure how much more that will take away the shadows. You may be able to position the person/subject further away from the background/wall to make it less noticeable.
Im sure someone else will be able to help you more.
:)

John_Reed
04-20-2005, 10:34 AM
When I take photos in my apt of subjects, there is usually a shadow cast over the top of their head and shoulders in the photo. I'm assuming this has to do with the lighting and my camera built-in flash. Or possibly the angle of the shot. Are there any settings on the camera that I can adjust to reduce this? Or do I have to add more light to the room. thanksYou didn't say what kind of camera you have, but these kinds of shadows generally stem from the position of the flash emitter relative to the camera lens. If the flash is below the camera lens, you'll see shadows above your subject, due to the different "points of view" between the two elements. If you rotate your camera around until the flash is above the lens, you'll generally get more pleasing effects, with the shadows falling below and out of sight of the lens. I like the suggestion of using "available light," but some cameras don't offer you that option, some do. My camera, a Panasonic FZ15, has the flash directly above the lens, so as long as I hold the camera horizontal, I get no flash shadows; but if I hold it on its side - presto! flash shadows around the opposite side of the subject.

TheObiJuan
04-20-2005, 11:08 AM
harsh shadows are caused by harsh light. You could try bouncing to diffuse the light. If you make a card that will reflect the light upwards to the cieling, the difference will be dramatic. Or you could try turning down the Flash EV compensation, if applicable.

gary_hendricks
04-20-2005, 11:18 AM
Adding more light to the room is certainly the best way. Like John mentioned, I'd say try out a different angle of the flash unit versus the lenses.