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View Full Version : Help! Taking Pics at Concert.....



ercartman80
04-17-2005, 09:26 PM
Hi :)
I have a Sony DSC-W1, I just got and I have only used it outdoors a few times. I'm going to an indoor concert this weekend and I'm sure it will be pretty dark. We've got really great seats and I would like to get some awesome shots. Could anyone help and tell me which mode to put the camera on for the best shot, or what would be the best settings. I feel like such a dork, this is my first digital camera and I know nothing about it! Thank you for any help you can give me!!!!

gary_hendricks
04-17-2005, 10:45 PM
I think these two posts will help you, read on ...

http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6929&highlight=concert

http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6994&highlight=concert

ercartman80
04-18-2005, 07:36 AM
Thank you, that did help a bit. But, is there anyone out there who has or is really familiar with this camera in particular, and knows specifically what mode is best for this camera?

ercartman80
04-23-2005, 08:41 AM
Well, I went to the concert last night, I was pleased with maybe 3 or 4 of the pictures :( If I posted a couple or emailed them to somebody here at the board, could you hellp me and tell me what I did wrong and what I can do to improve for next time?
Thanks Y'all!

Norm in Fujino
04-23-2005, 09:39 AM
Well, I went to the concert last night, I was pleased with maybe 3 or 4 of the pictures :( If I posted a couple or emailed them to somebody here at the board, could you hellp me and tell me what I did wrong and what I can do to improve for next time?
Thanks Y'all!

there may not be many people familiar with the specific camera, but we might be able to give some general hints. Post away!

ercartman80
04-23-2005, 08:59 PM
With this picture what did I do wrong, should I have increased the flash, etc?

ercartman80
04-23-2005, 09:03 PM
And this picture, any suggestions on what I might have done wrong, and what I can do better in the future

Norm in Fujino
04-23-2005, 09:20 PM
What were your camera settings? It's hard to tell without exif information and seeing the full-sized shots, but a few suggestions:

1. Whenever possible, shoot on the camera's highest quality setting (5.0M).
2. What was color balance set to? (it looks like it might be a bit dodgy in the first photo).
3. Were you shooting at high ISO? There looks like quite a bit of noise in the shot; this might be helped with a free program like NeatImage.
4. Both shots seem a bit out of focus, or with a bit of camera shake. What shutter speed were you using? If you were using flash, setting the flash to highest output might help.

Main thing is more practice, using your camera's controls until you find out what works best for you.

ercartman80
04-23-2005, 09:31 PM
I had the camera set to P with is suppose to do everything automatically I thought. Allthough I did set ISO to 400. Next time should I keep it on P and turn down the ISO and turn the flash up to the highest? Almost all of the pictures seemed really out of focus, I thought I was pretty steady, I wonder if there is a specific setting on this camera for focus and maybe it wasn't set right?

Norm in Fujino
04-23-2005, 09:44 PM
At a dark setting like this, ISO 400 is probably necessary, although if you were very close and could use flash, you could get away with lower ISO setting. In any event, I would look into neatimage, since the basic version is free, and it will really help lower noise in high ISO images. (http://www.neatimage.com)

The Sony may have difficulty focusing at low light conditions, I don't know it specifically, but most digicams do have some difficulty when it's dark. In the second picture, the singer is off-center. Did you focus on her (half-press shutter) before moving the camera to make this composition? If not, the camera probably focused on the background instead.
As practice you might try focusing the camera inside a room with similar lighting and distance conditions and see what results. Practice, practice, practice. ;)

nick_the_guy
04-30-2005, 07:31 PM
Another issue I'd have with your photos is the composition. Lots of empty space to the left and above in the first photo. In the second photo, the subject is cut-off, there's too much empty space again and some clutter in the bottom-left corner of the picture.

I find myself spot-metering/focusing, getting a focus/exposure lock and recomposing in the matter of a second or two when taking concert pictures. I dunno if your camera is capable of that though.

Ray Schnoor
04-30-2005, 08:54 PM
As to the flash, unless your seats were spectacular, the working range is only up to a little over 11 ft. Much further than that, and it won't help much at all. I'm just guessing that there probably wouldn't have been much difference in your photos if you had not used a flash. Additionally, most cameras set the exposure on a flash shot at 1/60 second, so this may cause some blur in a moving target.

I'm not sure how your camera performs in low light focusing, but it may not be able to focus fast enough on a moving target in low light which may have caused the lack of focus on at least the 1st photo, but maybe both. The second photo may be more out of focus because the singer is not in the center of the photo where the camera was attempting to focus. Just my thoughts.

Ray.

D Thompson
05-01-2005, 10:45 AM
As to the flash, unless your seats were spectacular, the working range is only up to a little over 11 ft. Much further than that, and it won't help much at all.
Ray.

I'd like to add my 2 cents worth and please don't take it wrong. I was not at that concert, but another one just the other night and had seats about 22 rows back. A person a couple of seats over fired his flash the whole concert. To me this was rather annoying and as Ray said, the flash ain't gonna reach from there. Not only is the flash annoying to those around you, it can also be annoying and dangerous to the performers. Ever been caught looking directly at a flash? A few seconds of blindness? I don't know if your camera is capable of manual or not. I've not shot any concerts yet with my 20D, but have with my old Canon film. I usually used ISO 400 film, 1/125th, f4 - f8 and came out with some decent shots. The performers are usually well lit (no pun intended :D ). I have seen it posted in the lobby that no flash or no cameras permitted too. Anyway just my 2 cents from a different perspective.

Dennis

Ray Schnoor
05-01-2005, 11:14 AM
I'd like to add my 2 cents worth and please don't take it wrong. I was not at that concert, but another one just the other night and had seats about 22 rows back. A person a couple of seats over fired his flash the whole concert. To me this was rather annoying and as Ray said, the flash ain't gonna reach from there. Not only is the flash annoying to those around you, it can also be annoying and dangerous to the performers. Ever been caught looking directly at a flash? A few seconds of blindness? I don't know if your camera is capable of manual or not. I've not shot any concerts yet with my 20D, but have with my old Canon film. I usually used ISO 400 film, 1/125th, f4 - f8 and came out with some decent shots. The performers are usually well lit (no pun intended :D ). I have seen it posted in the lobby that no flash or no cameras permitted too. Anyway just my 2 cents from a different perspective.

Dennis

I agree completely. I don't understand why people who use flash photography where it is not permitted aren't just escorted from the concert! Additionally, I always get a chuckle when people in the balcony shoot off some flash shots.

Ray.