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gary_hendricks
04-17-2005, 08:03 AM
Ok, I've finally got down to consolidating all the photography tips I've posted here. Read on and enjoy! :)

P.S. By the way Jeff, need your help to make this a Sticky.

Digital Camera Tips:

How Many Megapixels Do You Really Need in a Digital Camera?
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5877

How to Take Care of Your Digital Camera
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7118

A Guide to Exposure Metering Modes
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12172

Tips for Making Your Camera Battery Last
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11663


Photography Techniques:

5 Things You Need to Know About Shutter Speed
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4928

How to Take Better Night Photos
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4841

Learn How to Take Action Shots
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5141

7 Tips for Shooting Great Landscape Photos
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5140

5 Tips for Photographing Fireworks
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5817

6 Tips for Shooting Great Sunset Photos
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6333

A Beginner's Guide to Wedding Photography
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4929

How to Use the Selective Focus Technique
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12170

How to Take Good Photos in Museums and Cathedrals
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12173


Photo Processing Tips:

How to Organize Your Digital Photos
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5142

A Good Way to Super Size Your Digital Photo
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5419

Top 5 Free Photo Editors for Windows
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6058

Share Your Digital Photos Using the TV
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6164

A Guide to Scanning and Digitizing Your Old Photos
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5945

A Guide to Image File Formats and Image Compression
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5420

Essential Tips for Printing Digital Photos
http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7252

kornhauser
04-17-2005, 09:09 AM
VERY helpful. Thanks for posting all that information!

lavins
04-26-2005, 10:20 PM
Do you happen to know?

gary_hendricks
04-27-2005, 08:57 AM
Do you happen to know?

Sorry are you refering to camera manuals? If yes, then you should go to the manufacturer's site.

Sandie
06-04-2005, 02:32 PM
I just began using a Canon Powershot SD500 ELPH. For years I have used a Nikon F-3 SLR. While I am really impressed with what this little camera can do, I am having a problem when the photos I have taken are printed. I seem to be losing some of the photograph on all four sides. What I see on the computer screen is more than what is on the print - either from a lab or from my own printer. I am used to shooting full frame with the Nikon. Is there a way to ensure when I edit photos that I get the full image? Thanks for your help.
Sandie

Ray Schnoor
06-05-2005, 05:56 AM
I seem to be losing some of the photograph on all four sides. What I see on the computer screen is more than what is on the print - either from a lab or from my own printer. I am used to shooting full frame with the Nikon. Is there a way to ensure when I edit photos that I get the full image?
Your camera takes photos in a 4:3 (3072/2304 = 4/3) aspect ratio. For printing, to fill up the print edge to edge with your photo, there will have to be some cropping. You can minimize this effect you do the cropping instead of letting the printer/print lab do the cropping. Just make the aspect ratio of the photo to be printed the same aspect ratio of the print media.

For example 4x6 photo crop to 3072x2048 pixels, 5x7 to 3072x2194 pixels, 8x10 to 2880x2304 pixels. These photos should then print full frame on the indicated print sizes.

A good post which illustrates what will be cropped for different print sizes is listed here: http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showpost.php?p=46196&postcount=19

Ray.

Sandie
06-09-2005, 06:01 PM
Thank you for taking the time to reply and supply the examples. I appreciate your kindness. I will work on this when I do the editing and saving.

aparmley
06-10-2005, 01:56 PM
Im not sure where the best place would be for this question, I figured here is as good of place as any...
When you see examples of pictures that say they are 100% crops of a particular photo, how do you create that crop... I mean I know that I can view the photo at 100% and its huge... but What constitutes that a particular crop is a 100% crop... Maybe someone can explain it too me... the thought crossed my mind late last night and I have been thinking about it all day but I am most certain I am looking at it the wrong way and there is some easy to explain how to do this... Thanks... :confused:

bspolin
06-22-2005, 01:01 PM
everything was covered except for concert photography

speaklightly
06-22-2005, 01:56 PM
bspolin-

As a lot of folks on this forum already know I take a lot of concert and theater shots. I worked my way through a good number of digital cameras, among the group were the Panasonic FZ 10, 15, and 20 models and many others. However, as has been previously suggested in this forum, I now use dSLR cameras exclusively.

Yes, the FZ-20 could do the job, but you are using the camera at its absolute limits: maximum aperture, maximum ISO etc. The result is that you get very slow shutter speeds that are virtually incapable of stopping any action at all on stage and you become entirely dependent on the amount of light that is available on stage when you want to shoot.

I moved to dSLR's because using the FZ-20 at F 2.8 and ISO 400 was just making shooting very difficult with very spotty, unpreditable results. I needed more ISO and if economically feasible, faster lenses.

Today with a dSLR I can shoot at ISO 3200, and I can do it with a reasonable F3.5 aperture lenses and reasonable shutter speeds that really will stop action on stage without using any flash.

The limitations that I had experienced with digital cameras such as the FZ-20 were gone. Now I no longer have to cross my fingers while going to a concert to take photos, I now get very consistent and much higher quality results. In the FZ-20 I was always fighting the noise gremlin, with dSLR cameras such as the Canon 20D and the Pentax 1stDS, noise is no longer a problem.

I am sorry to make this post so long, but I thought it might be helpful to chronicle the progression I went through. OK, the logical question is this: If you don't want to spent $1,000 to $2,000 to get into a good dSLR outfit, then what do you do?

Remember that the two limiting factors in concert amd theater photography are ISO speeds and fast lenses. I also mentioned that when you can really increase the ISO speed sustantially, the need for a fast lens is reduced considerably. Therefore, you might want to take a look at the newer point and shoot digital cameras that have much higher available ISO speeds such as the Fuji F-10. The F-10 has a max ISO setting of 1600 that gives you much more flexibility. So for around $300, the F-10 will give a piece of the action. Yes, it does have some limitations, such as only 3X optical zoom, and please keep in mind that when the F-10 is zoomed out to that 3X position, the useable aperture falls to F 5.0 which is very limiting. So setup your shots with the F-10 where you are at the wide angle position. Then you can get some really great photos. I have attached a photo from the F-10 to demonstrate what the F-10 really can do if you setup your photos to operate within the F-10 limitations.

I have attached a night photo with the Fuji F-10 to show what the camera can do.

Again, my apologies for making this post so long.

Sarah Joyce

Phill D
08-07-2005, 12:42 AM
Sarah fantastic fireworks shot what settings did you use to capture such sharp detail? On the point of concert shots with an FZ20 I have just tried doing the same myself & yes as you said it was obviously pushing the noise boundaries & only worked reasonably at relatively still moments, although I did inadvertantly get some interesting blurred motion on a few images. Shame I can't claim it was by design :D

gary_hendricks
08-28-2005, 01:08 AM
Hi Sarah,

Those are fantastic firework shots! Excellent stuff.

Franko515
05-17-2006, 09:45 AM
First let me say THANKYOU for this guide :)

I will be at Walt Disney World on the 4th of July this year :D I just purchased a Canon S3 IS, will this do for fireworks and night shots? Doesn't the flash help on night shots up to like 10ft away? For fireworks no flash correct :o (it sounds dumb to me, i just wanna make sure)

Thanks in advance

lyre_byrd
06-09-2006, 06:49 PM
Does anyone have any good tips for me in regard to photographing seascapes, ie. time of day (I assume early morning, early evening?).
Should the horizon be high or low or does in matter?
Anything else I should be paying attention to?
I'll be using a Canon Rebel XT.

JLV
06-10-2006, 07:22 AM
Should the horizon be high or low or does in matter?
Anything else I should be paying attention to?
I'll be using a Canon Rebel XT.

A good rule of composition is to place the horizon about 1/3 of the way down from the top or 1/3 of the way up from the bottom. If you want to emphasize the sky, use the latter.

wutske
06-10-2006, 10:21 AM
A good rule of composition is to place the horizon about 1/3 of the way down from the top or 1/3 of the way up from the bottom. If you want to emphasize the sky, use the latter.
I'm not shure if the Rebel XT does, but some camera's can draw a small grid on the screen that helps you allign the horizon, or helps getting the subject in the center of the photo.

lyre_byrd
06-10-2006, 05:57 PM
Thank you all so much for your thoughts and tips.

Regarding the light: This morning I went out about 5.30 for about 10 minutes to experiment, and I guess it was a tad early; there was not sufficient light (I try not to use a flash), because the camera had a hard time focusing and therefore the shutter would not depress. With perseverance, I did manage to get a few good shots, though.

I only shoot in automatic mode because I am a novice, but had I shot in manual mode, would setting the ISO to a higher number have helped me? What else could I have done with the settings to bring in more light. Would a tripod have helped?

Also, is there a rule of thumb that would indicate the best morning time for light. How close to 'sunrise' for instance?

JLV
06-11-2006, 07:02 AM
Also, is there a rule of thumb that would indicate the best morning time for light. How close to 'sunrise' for instance?

Time of day is really relative to what you want to achieve. Any time of day may be good. When there is not much light, you need to compensate by using a larger lens opening (lower number) or a slower shutter speed or a higher ISO, or a combination of any or all. You will need to experiment to see what you like. If you are using a slower shutter speed a tripod is helpful. By the way, unless you wish to illuminate something in the foreground, the flash will not help.

bryanbendo
08-15-2006, 07:02 PM
awsome articles......thanks alot gary

gary_hendricks
11-08-2006, 08:22 AM
Hi thanks for the feedback. I am planning to put in more tips here... just need to get some time on my hands. :)

prandi
12-16-2006, 02:23 AM
a very helpful article!!!:)

unknown_zero
04-11-2007, 09:56 AM
hi.. if you want more resources, tips and trick of digital photography :D
just follow this link :) :)
http://digital-camera.awardspace.com

LeandroMP-
06-23-2007, 02:35 PM
Hey guys. Thanks for posting this, is really helpful!!..

But im looking tips for nightshot's on the beach. Here's the summer, and im going to the beach in 2 weeks, and im pretty sure theres going to be a bonfire.. so.., it will help me alot some tips..

toriaj
06-25-2007, 11:20 PM
Bonfire! I took some pics by a bonfire once. My best suggestion: take pics of the actual bonfire on a tripod, try different settings for effect. Don't try to take pictures of people by the firelight. The light is just too low. You'll need a flash to take pictures of them without motion blur (unless you like the motion-blur effect. In that case, just use your tripod so you don't get camera shake.) And nightshots on the beach? If I were you, I'd try some long exposures of the crashing waves lit by the moon :)

LeandroMP-
06-26-2007, 06:53 PM
Bonfire! I took some pics by a bonfire once. My best suggestion: take pics of the actual bonfire on a tripod, try different settings for effect. Don't try to take pictures of people by the firelight. The light is just too low. You'll need a flash to take pictures of them without motion blur (unless you like the motion-blur effect. In that case, just use your tripod so you don't get camera shake.) And nightshots on the beach? If I were you, I'd try some long exposures of the crashing waves lit by the moon :)

Thank you so much. I really apreciated :D..

ptp
08-19-2007, 03:12 PM
Hi, This is my first time on a forum. I am having trouble with my usb port not being recognized. I have downloaded the Canon software. Is there something I'm missing.

SONYNUT
12-16-2007, 09:34 PM
i took a great bonfire pic 20 years ago.in the film days..it was perfect except for one person that just had to move...grrrrrrrrrrrrr

demmerich1
01-21-2008, 09:04 AM
Hi. I am new to the forum and definitely a novice. I see that there was a post on this thread in 2005 about using DSLRs for concert pictures. There are many new cameras on the market now. I started out using a Panasonic Lumix LZ2 then moved to the Pansonic Lumix TZ1. I am now looking at the FZ18 because I am ready to try my hand at some manual controls. I've captured some excellent shots (in MY opinion) but it's not very consistent. I "trash" MANY of them due to the inconsistency.

Does anyone have an opinion on what the best camera or technique is for taking concert pictures?

qmoon
02-02-2008, 07:21 PM
Hi. I am new to the forum and definitely a novice. I see that there was a post on this thread in 2005 about using DSLRs for concert pictures. There are many new cameras on the market now. I started out using a Panasonic Lumix LZ2 then moved to the Pansonic Lumix TZ1. I am now looking at the FZ18 because I am ready to try my hand at some manual controls. I've captured some excellent shots (in MY opinion) but it's not very consistent. I "trash" MANY of them due to the inconsistency.

Does anyone have an opinion on what the best camera or technique is for taking concert pictures?

Hey...I know you...I'm on the DL forum too! :) (dlfan)

I'm no expert, but I think many will say Fuji is the best for low lighting situations. That's why I sprung for the s6000fd. I'm looking forward to using it for shows--as soon as I figure it out.:o

rohit_manohar
02-13-2008, 05:03 AM
Hey everyone, I just found the perfect page for you guys to understand the basics and even advanced tips on photography. Its all on

http://www.zibtips.com/phototips.aspx

Its got stuff like web seminars and tips and what not. Plus, check out the page on "how to photograph children". I found that really cute. Im not much into the hardware specs of a camera but i found the page really easy to follow.

Have fun,
rohit

thomasstuart
11-22-2009, 11:23 PM
There are Ten Tips:
1. Warm Up Those Tones.
2. Sunglasses Polarizer.
3. Outdoor Portraits That Shine.
4. Macro Mode Madness.
5. Horizon Line Mayhem.
6. Massive Media Card.
7. High Rez All the Way.
8. Tolerable Tripod.
9. Self Timer Fun.
10. Slow Motion Water.

AdamW
11-23-2009, 08:36 AM
There's been several of these posts lately. There are different user names and the member has just a handful of total posts, the English grammar is very bad, and the sig is odd, like "acai berry" or "christmas gifts." All the members have a "sify.com" email address. The text of the posts is mostly photography related, but the content is as awkward as the syntax. This has all the hallmarks of spam posts, but these have no links in them. So what's up here?

Falconest174
01-09-2010, 07:40 PM
This is a trick that I tried today to save a shot 'ruined' by sun glare off the inside of the lens hood. The sun was reflected from a window just out of the frame above the bird feeder. The glare that it created made what looked to be an irreparable glare washing out the pic.

I used ACDSee 2009 and used the automatic exposure correction. One click was all it took. Would PSE 7 or Photoshop itself be that quick and easy. One click-Done!
#1 uncorrected.
#2 corrected.

joyce
08-03-2010, 03:38 AM
What is the best technique to make your camera last and long?

joyce

-----------
Virtual-Tours.com
Interactive Virtual Tour Specialist

D Thompson
08-03-2010, 12:12 PM
What is the best technique to make your camera last and long?

joyce

Don't worry about it, just use it. :rolleyes:

SpecialK
08-03-2010, 03:04 PM
This is a trick that I tried today to save a shot 'ruined' by sun glare off the inside of the lens hood. The sun was reflected from a window just out of the frame above the bird feeder. The glare that it created made what looked to be an irreparable glare washing out the pic.

I used ACDSee 2009 and used the automatic exposure correction. One click was all it took. Would PSE 7 or Photoshop itself be that quick and easy. One click-Done!
#1 uncorrected.
#2 corrected.

I'd say vastly improved, though not quite "fixed". PSE has a Auto function as well.

Marsh Vegas
08-23-2010, 03:29 PM
Smoke photography:
Here are some nice pictures and a tutorial of how the photographer did it. Probably interest a few people here.

http://www.pascalbovet.com/2010/08/smoke-photography/

Damini18
03-12-2011, 08:49 AM
I'm not sure where the best place would be for this question, but anyone who is interested in digital photography should review Sony Cyber-Shot DSC camera for its performance and quality of pictures. A good place to find about Sony Cyber-Shot DSC camera reviews is at:
<a href="http://digitalbrandcamerasreview.com">digital cameras</a>

Robert Besen
03-12-2011, 02:58 PM
Looks like spam

K1W1
03-12-2011, 03:17 PM
Looks like spam


I have already reported it.

AdamW
06-25-2011, 07:09 AM
Reported as spam.

Arun Mohan R
01-16-2013, 03:06 AM
certain times wen we take photos with high key or low key effects....the picture will look a lil grainy ...we wont exactly get that slr quality....hw can we correct that??

tim11
01-21-2013, 02:15 AM
Well, you can improve slightly with softwares like NeatImage, NoiseNinja, Photoshop; etc. However, the use of software isn't majic cure. There's a saying 'trash in - trash out'. It means there's nothing you can do about a hopelessly noisy image.
In Photoshop you go to the menu: Filter - Noise - Reduce Noise... Then you just have to find the settings to your liking. Another thing is that, when you reduce noise you will also lose some details. There's a compromise.

greenviewer
05-16-2013, 12:45 AM
very helpful! thanks for all the tips. Are you a professional photographer?

bunchuncertain
11-21-2013, 07:39 AM
this is great..nice post very informative..thank you for sharing!

Jbomb
12-17-2013, 06:59 AM
Just what i was after thankyou!!!

maxilo
04-22-2014, 06:55 AM
Ok, so for digital cameras?