PDA

View Full Version : Blurred Birds



yuukis
04-11-2005, 09:33 AM
I am new to Digital Cameras, but I have a Canon EOS Rebel and use a Sigma 70-300mm Telephoto with a Tamaron doubler to shoot pictures of birds. At 400-600mm I get motion and even at higher ISO the pictures are not clear. I am considering getting an IS lens, 70-300mm, and see that Canon has two, one for about $500 and one for $2000. My questions are, what's the difference between the two and, or should I just get a good tripod and stick with the Sigma?

Ray Schnoor
04-11-2005, 10:16 AM
Without seeing any of your photos, it's hard to determine if you should stay with the Sigma lens. What mode are you shooting? What is your shutter speed? Are you using continuous auto focus so that the camera is in focus on the bird when the shot is captured and not where the bird was when you focused?

Ray.

Norm in Fujino
04-11-2005, 10:42 AM
I am new to Digital Cameras, but I have a Canon EOS Rebel and use a Sigma 70-300mm Telephoto with a Tamaron doubler to shoot pictures of birds. At 400-600mm I get motion and even at higher ISO the pictures are not clear. I am considering getting an IS lens, 70-300mm, and see that Canon has two, one for about $500 and one for $2000. My questions are, what's the difference between the two and, or should I just get a good tripod and stick with the Sigma?

I'll begin by saying that I don't know anything about that Sigma lens, and excuse me if I sound brusque--I don't mean it that way. . .but, in general, you get what you pay for, so a lens of that size and Sigma's general price range is probably not going to be the sharpest tack in the pack. Add a doubler and your fuzziness index goes up, and the lens gets dimmer. If you're attempting to hand-hold a 600mm lens, you're a steadier man than I, for sure. You need to start with the tripod, put the camera on it with the Sigma lens, and shoot some test shots at the same target, just to be sure of what the [i]lens[/] is capable of without camera shake. Try at a variety of f-stops to find out which gives you the best quality image. Then, if you still can't get the shots you need, think about a second lens.
The differences between the confusing variety of Canon lenses has to do mostly with three things, so far as I can discern: 1) build quality; 2) brightness (maximum f-stop) and 3) whether the lens has IS or not.
YMMV

timmciglobal
04-16-2005, 01:52 AM
Well, a good rule and used pretty often is 1/focal length. So if your shooting at 600 mm you need 1/600th or better shutter speed atleast, that is probably what you want to be looking at as your primary cause of blur.

IS helps but it won't help as much as mirror lockup and really good tripod.

Tim

Geoff Chandler
04-16-2005, 02:44 AM
Well, a good rule and used pretty often is 1/focal length. So if your shooting at 600 mm you need 1/600th or better shutter speed atleast, that is probably what you want to be looking at as your primary cause of blur.

IS helps but it won't help as much as mirror lockup and really good tripod.

Tim
Tim has hit the nail on the head. Untill you have your image stable you can't judge the lens combination. That focal length rule is definately a good guide, but also at that length you may not have enough light and therefore the tripod suggestion from Norm is also relevent. Once you have stabilised - then you can decide if the lens is good enough or not with or without the doubler.

Bald Eagle
04-20-2005, 08:50 PM
I agree with everything stated above, and if i could, would like to add my two cents worth. Along with the tripod for stability, check to see if you have the option of adding a remote shutter release cable. When you are shooting with telephoto lenses, the slighest movement will cause blurring. I use a cable on mine and it works great. hope this helps.