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wingsley
04-10-2005, 10:24 PM
I currently own an Olympus C-3020Z. I am considering the purchase of a D-SLR (possibly a Canon Digital Rebel XT or an EOS 20D) and I have some questions:

Does anyone here have experience using D-SLR cameras in winter (snow, wind, cold) conditions? How do lenses hold up? How do camera batteries hold up? Is there any special protection available for these conditions?

It seems, when looking at the reviews, that Olympus digital cameras shooting in RAW mode consistently have larger file sizes (megapixel for megapixel) than Canon digital cameras shooting in RAW mode. This observation isn't just limited to SLRs. It holds true for fixed-lens digicams as well (compare the PowerShot G6 to the C-7070WZ) and this baffles me. Am I mistaken about this? Why is it this way?


I do some indoor shooting (personal/portrait, family gatherings, meeting halls) and alot of outdoor shooting (vistas/panoramas, wildlife, sled dog races, landmarks/construction projects) and have way exceeded the capabilities of the C-3020Z. Is there a sufficient offering of lenses for a Canon D-SLR to pick out a small lens collection to go with the camera? It seems like some people zealously stick to manufacturer-only lenses and no aftermarket. Why?

Ray Schnoor
04-11-2005, 06:27 AM
I can't speak for Canon dSLR cameras in particular, but with a Nikon D70, I have taken several skiing photos this past winter carrying the camera in a Tamrac digital zoom 4 bag between shots. I used this bag instead of my TLZ mini because the mini wouldn't hold the camera with a Sigma 70-300mm lens attached. This bag is just a little bigger than the mini. The photos in the following gallery were taken over several days in temperatures ranging from 5-35 degrees. Not once did I have to change batteries, and at the end, the battery still indicated that is was fully charged in the camera.

http://rschnoor.smugmug.com/gallery/415009

Ray.

speaklightly
04-11-2005, 09:49 AM
Ray-

Thank you very much for sharing these great winter photos with us.

Sarah Joyce

Ray Schnoor
04-11-2005, 10:06 AM
The trick is to not fall down while I am trying to keep up with my 9 year old daughter on the black diamond trails. Fortunately, I still have no problem with my 6 year old who graduated to the blue trails this winter.

Ray.

Norm in Fujino
04-11-2005, 11:01 AM
The trick is to not fall down while I am trying to keep up with my 9 year old daughter on the black diamond trails. Fortunately, I still have no problem with my 6 year old who graduated to the blue trails this winter.

Ray.

The general consensus I've usually heard is that batteries tend to lose power when very cold, so you should place an extra set against your body when out in the open. I haven't heard any specific notices about any of the cameras you mention, but I would guess they are all hard workers. And now, to plug the camera I just bought :D , there is a photographer in Finland who uses the Oly E-1 and E-300 out in the snow and he gets some amazing shots, so I assume there's no major problem:
http://homepage.mac.com/lsippu/.Pictures/Photo%20Album%20Pictures/2004-11-22%2013.00.58%20-0800/_B287691.jpg
(BTW, the E-300 is not guaranteed to be weatherproof, so I wouldn't treat mine like the one above!)

The rest of his shots are at: Lauri Sippu (http://homepage.mac.com/lsippu/PhotoAlbum43.html)

wingsley
04-12-2005, 08:41 AM
What kind of accessories are available to protect a Canon D-SLR from cold, wind and snow?

Rex914
04-12-2005, 09:32 PM
I don't know about particular accessories, but if you plan on bringing your DSLR into harsh environments, you better opt for a pro-series camera that has the proper weather sealing. You might get by with a nice bag, but chances are the camera will give in.

wingsley
04-12-2005, 09:53 PM
I am indeed keeping the Canon EOS 20D in mind. All this is contingent on the money availability, of course...

ktixx
04-12-2005, 10:29 PM
I have heard that pretty much the only thing you need to worry about is keeping your camera dry (Unless we are talking about exreme conditions). When you are outside just keep it away from moisture. The cold poses a different problem because you have to be careful with condensation when you bring the camer into a warmer enviroment. A tip is to bring a 1 gallon ziplock bag, when you are done shooting, and just before you go inside, put the camera into the bag, and squeeze as much air out as possible, then seal it up. the Camera will have time to adjust to the warmer air inside and the condensation will form on the bag and not on your camera. I don't have any personal experience with this, but I have heard it works. Good luck

Ken

speaklightly
04-13-2005, 05:57 AM
ktixx-

The ziplock bag procedure does indeed work very well and I have used it lots of times. The main threat, as you mentioned is moisture.

Sarah Joyce

gabester
04-13-2005, 08:10 AM
ktixx-

The ziplock bag procedure does indeed work very well and I have used it lots of times. The main threat, as you mentioned is moisture.

Sarah Joyce

Indeed moisture threatens the camera body, but don't forget about the lens! I have two lenses affected with fungi. Luckily only a very small fraction of the area of a couple of elements and doesn't affect photo quality as far as I can discern; they are detectable by looking through the rear of the lens, pointing the front at a bright background and bringing the patches in and out of focus using the focusing or zooming ring. The fungus patches often manifest themselves as a "spider" pattern. The previous owner did admit to me that he used it in a very humid environment. So keep those lenses dry too, as well as the body. The fungus is pretty much irreversible. Some preventive measures:

- keep a dessicant in your bag
- avoid those leather lens pouches; leather tends to retain water vapor
- "sun out" a lens for an hour or two after a humid shooting session

wingsley
04-14-2005, 09:24 PM
Has anyone here ever used Canon's CA-560 automotive/cigarette lighter adaptor kit for recharging a Canon camera battery? I take a CA-560 out with me onto a sled dog race course (far from plug-in power) and just plug the "ciggie" end into a charged Prestone JumpIt and the other end into a Canon ZR40 digital camrcorder.

I was just wondering if anyone had used a CA-560 to top-off a digital camera's battery before.