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maflynn
08-19-2004, 06:29 PM
I've been using my sony DSC-P72 since last december. While it does take a nice picture, I've been noticing a few things that have hampered me.
Its a little slow - I press the button and sometimes a second or two before the image is captured.
Movement is blurry,
Flash recharging is slow (not sure if this is normal with other cameras).
Outside scenes are washed out. I've left the settings to automatic. The presets are limited for me to adjust the white balance and exposure.
Battery life - I do use the rechargeable AAs but with the flash on, they can get exhuasted pretty quickly

I'm looking into the idea of getting an digital SLR, I realize they can get pricey. I noticed that the preview on this website has the canon 20d.

I've heard good and bad about canon, so I'm not sure who to believe now.

Any recommendations - Mac compatible is a definite requirement.

Thanks

speaklightly
08-21-2004, 12:46 PM
Whenever you begin thinking about DSLR cameras, take a deep breath, and consider the facts.

(1) DSLR cameras produce wonderful digtal photo results. However, those results come at a price. Even the Canon Digital Rebel, which is one of the lowest priced DSLR's, with just the most basic lens (very little optical zoom)will cost $US 1150 to $US 1300. Naturally, you will want more optical zoom, well that means another lens, add $US 300 to $US 400. Because DSLR's are physically large cameras and you now need to carry one or two extra lenses, add $100 for a proper case that will protect your investment. The average DSLR outfit runs about $US 1500 to $1600.

(2) As mentioned above DSLR's are physically large cameras. These are not pocket size or even a size that could go into a small case you might carry on your belt.

(3) DSLR's are more technically complex digital cameras. They require a learning curve. Their digital photos are great, but getting those results require really knowing the camera.

Consurer digital cameras are much smaller, more point & shoot oriented, with many manual controls available, and they cost much less.

Here is a list of 5 and 6mp consumer digital cameras worth considering.

5mp digital cameras

Sony W-1
Sony V-1
Nikon 5700
HP R-707

6mp digital cameras

Fuji E-550
Casio P600
Olympus C-60

Thes digital cameras begin at $US 300 and top out at around $US 470. That is a lot LESS than $US 1500 to $US 1600.

Sarah Joyce

D70FAN
08-21-2004, 05:34 PM
Whenever you begin thinking about DSLR cameras, take a deep breath, and consider the facts.

(1) DSLR cameras produce wonderful digtal photo results. However, those results come at a price. Even the Canon Digital Rebel, which is one of the lowest priced DSLR's, with just the most basic lens (very little optical zoom)will cost $US 1150 to $US 1300. Naturally, you will want more optical zoom, well that means another lens, add $US 300 to $US 400. Because DSLR's are physically large cameras and you now need to carry one or two extra lenses, add $100 for a proper case that will protect your investment. The average DSLR outfit runs about $US 1500 to $1600.

(2) As mentioned above DSLR's are physically large cameras. These are not pocket size or even a size that could go into a small case you might carry on your belt.

(3) DSLR's are more technically complex digital cameras. They require a learning curve. Their digital photos are great, but getting those results require really knowing the camera.

Consurer digital cameras are much smaller, more point & shoot oriented, with many manual controls available, and they cost much less.

Here is a list of 5 and 6mp consumer digital cameras worth considering.

5mp digital cameras

Sony W-1
Sony V-1
Nikon 5700
HP R-707

6mp digital cameras

Fuji E-550
Casio P600
Olympus C-60

Thes digital cameras begin at $US 300 and top out at around $US 470. That is a lot LESS than $US 1500 to $US 1600.

Sarah Joyce

In my normal defense of Canon I would put the Canon A95 at the top of one of these lists.

maflynn
08-21-2004, 07:40 PM
Thank you for you insight and recommendations - I shall look into them for sure. So are other higher end camera's have faster actions and better white balance control and can they handle evening/dark shots as well as SLR's? I frequently have my camera and like to take some pictures of the cityscape at night. The sony really doesn't do this too well. I understand that I'll need to have a tripod for some of these as the shutter will stay open longer.

I purchased the sony knowing full well its a point and shoot camera. I've used it enough to know that I've out grown that and need somthing more power. Price was not an issue and a the idea of have full control of your pictures is somthing I would want. RAW format is is also something that I feel would be beneficial and it seems alot of non-slr camera's do not support this format.

Mike

speaklightly
08-21-2004, 08:04 PM
Mike-

Why not move up progressively. For $US 340 you can have a Fuji E-550. It is a 6mp, 4X optical zoom digital camera with a jpeg and raw image formats that is very capable of outstanding night shots.

Take note of the word, "progressively." $US 340 is a good deal less than the thousands of dollars spent on a DSLR kit and additional lenses, that you must haul around in a very large, and very expensive case. Learn digital photography one step and one technique at a time.

By spending thousands of dollars on a DSLR does not guarantee an instant knowledge store of basic, and very important digital photography principles. Why dot use a very compact and pocketable consumer digital camera such as the Fuji E-550 or other fine consumer digital cameras such as the Canon A-95. When you have your digital camera with you at all times, you take more digital photos and you accellerate the learning process.

In the final analysis, the choice is strictly up to you. Make the choice that is best for you. But, becoming a very experienced, and knowledgeable digital photographer is a progressive task. Building on many experiences, and by taking many digital photos is the way you learn.

Ask yourself this simple question: with which digital camera will I take the most digital photos and learn the most? Is it the shirt pocket digital camera or a DSLR kit that you haul around in a rather large case that will allow me to take many digital photos? You be the judge, Mike.

Sarah Joyce

D70FAN
08-21-2004, 09:30 PM
Thank you for you insight and recommendations - I shall look into them for sure. So are other higher end camera's have faster actions and better white balance control and can they handle evening/dark shots as well as SLR's? I frequently have my camera and like to take some pictures of the cityscape at night. The sony really doesn't do this too well. I understand that I'll need to have a tripod for some of these as the shutter will stay open longer.

I purchased the sony knowing full well its a point and shoot camera. I've used it enough to know that I've out grown that and need somthing more power. Price was not an issue and a the idea of have full control of your pictures is somthing I would want. RAW format is is also something that I feel would be beneficial and it seems alot of non-slr camera's do not support this format.

Mike

It sounds like you are ready for a dSLR. You can start with Auto and Program modes to familiarize yourself with functions. Figure on about a week to get used to all of the shortcut buttons. After that it's practice, and perfect.

As Sarah says, plan on spending about $1500 to start. After that it can get real expensive, real fast. My advice is to spend some quality time with a good camera store near you, and read, read, read.

If you have specific dSLR questions there are several members that can help on the dSLR pages.