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View Full Version : Cropped 4x6 photos when processed at store



huntnyc
03-13-2005, 06:43 PM
We (my wife mainly) use a Canon A80 camera and the thing tha tbothers me a lot is when we have our 4x6 prints processed, they are cropped. I have learned it is a mismatch between the 4x3 and 3x2 aspect ratios of the image sensor and the print processing, if I am understanding this correctly. I know next to nothing about digital cameras but am very familar with computers.

What can we do so that our images will be produced in the size we shoot them with the camera? At present, I am thinking of buying a d
SLr camera that has a 3x2 sensor just because of this annoyance? If you could help me in this problem, I would be most grateful.

Gary

timmciglobal
03-13-2005, 10:57 PM
Nothing can be done about that, 4X3 is going to have crop, if your using a kodak picture maker click Edits & Enlargements and Zoom and Crop and you can select whats being croped in your image (so heads arn't cut off)

Tim

ricjk
03-14-2005, 01:34 AM
Shooting in 1600x1200 will result in an image with a 3:2 ratio.

huntnyc
03-14-2005, 04:35 AM
Thanks and Rick I don't quite understand how that would work with 1600x1200 becoming 3x2 ratio image but I do know our camera supports this so I will give this a try now and test it out. Thanks for your help. i am glad I found this forum.

Gary

dwig
03-14-2005, 05:09 AM
We (my wife mainly)
What can we do so that our images will be produced in the size we shoot them with the camera?...
Gary

There is no way other than printing them yourself and printing them with borders. If you must have 4x6 final prints you would need to print them on larger paper so when the border is trimmed, the result it a 4x6 print.

_ALL_ borderless printing, whether its an inkjet or laser printer, or whether its a photochemical lab printer, requires that some of the image overflow the edge of the paper. The mechanical system that places the paper can't be perfect and the overflow allows for the alignment variations from one print to the next. This is a fact of life with both digital and film printing.

The secondary issue of whether your camera's format matches the aspect ratio of the print also can't be "fixed" other than to use a camera that shoots the same aspect ratio as the print you intend to make. Since 4x6, 5x7, and 8x10 are all different aspect ratios you would need different cameras for each size. Not practical, so good photographers learn to visualize the shape of the desired print and frame the picture to allow for the cropping that will occur during printing.

huntnyc
03-14-2005, 05:35 AM
Thanks a lot for that. Would it then be practical in light of what you mentioned to resize my photos down to 1600x1200 from 2272x1704? Sorry if my questions may be simple in nature but I know so little about this. Thanks again.

Gary

Ray Schnoor
03-14-2005, 06:11 AM
Shooting in 1600x1200 will result in an image with a 3:2 ratio.

Actually 1600x1200 is a 4:3 ratio. 1800x1200 would be a 3:2 ratio.

I'm not sure what image editing software you have, but if you change the size of your photos from 2272x1704 to 2556x1704 in the software, they would print out full frame in the lab with white stripes on the sides of the photo. In Photoshop, this would be done with the Image>Canvas Size command.

Ray.

dwig
03-14-2005, 07:01 AM
Thanks a lot for that. Would it then be practical in light of what you mentioned to resize my photos down to 1600x1200 from 2272x1704? Sorry if my questions may be simple in nature but I know so little about this. Thanks again.

Gary

Simple math shows that wouldn't work (1600x1200=4:3, 6x4=4:2.66) and would be more downsampling than necessary. The correct ratio for a 4x6 would be 2272x1514. This resizing should be done as "cropping", otherwise the image would be distorted (stretched or compressed in one dimension). This would still be cropped when printed as a borderless print at the lab, but at least the crop would be smaller and would be more uniform on all sides.

The other alternative, if your software offers the option, is to resize the "canvas" instead of the "image". Resizing the canvas to 3000x2000, leaving the image centered, would leave a 3:2 ratio image and when printed 4x6 would image the whole original image with a border. You might be successful with 2700x1800. It would leave a narrower border though it might be too narrow and could still result in some trimming.

huntnyc
03-14-2005, 08:33 AM
Yes, I see what you are saying and my program does allow for this. Might try a few set with different canvas sizes to see if they will work. Also, somebody mentioned to me that possibly some of the lowered priaaced point and shooots from Sony have the 3x2 ratio. Is that true? Also, I am used to Canon but I don't know of any option in their point and shoot that have 3x2 ratio seensors. Are there any point and shoot cameras that have this option that would be comparable in feature with the Canon A80?

Thanks for all your input.

Gary

Ray Schnoor
03-14-2005, 08:46 AM
Also, somebody mentioned to me that possibly some of the lowered priaaced point and shooots from Sony have the 3x2 ratio. Is that true? Also, I am used to Canon but I don't know of any option in their point and shoot that have 3x2 ratio seensors. Are there any point and shoot cameras that have this option that would be comparable in feature with the Canon A80?

The Nikon Coolpix 5400 offers a 3:2 image option. It is currently selling for ~$450 with a $200 rebate for a final cost of $250. You would also be able to use all of your CF cards.

Ray.

huntnyc
03-14-2005, 09:14 AM
Ray,

Thanks for the tip but do you know of a smilarly configured camera that has an LCD a little bit larger than the 1.5. My eyesight is not good at all. I think on our A80 it is 1.8 which is still small but if there is one at least that size or larger that would be great.

Thanks again.

Gary

jamison55
03-14-2005, 11:25 AM
My old Oly 5050 had a 1.8" LCD, a 3:2 mode (wich I left on full time - unless I was shoooting for 8x10's), and a nice f1.8 lens. I think a refurb'd 5050 can be had for around $300 on E*ay now.

ricjk
03-14-2005, 12:18 PM
Actually 1600x1200 is a 4:3 ratio. 1800x1200 would be a 3:2 ratio.



I just realized that I was thinking of the Postcard mode, which is supposed to create 3:2 images. At least, that's what the manual says. I've never used it myself.

Geoff Chandler
03-14-2005, 03:24 PM
Ray,

Thanks for the tip but do you know of a smilarly configured camera that has an LCD a little bit larger than the 1.5. My eyesight is not good at all. I think on our A80 it is 1.8 which is still small but if there is one at least that size or larger that would be great.

Thanks again.
Gary

The A80 has a 1.5" screen I believe. The A 75, 85 & 95 have a 1.8 screen which is a bit better doesn't sound a lot.But they are all variations of the same basic camera - which is why I mention them. My 2 cameras have the same difference and I can just about cope with the 1.8" but barely the 1.5". Of course a 2" screen would be even better!! The Fuji E-550 has a 2" screen - but hey - you can keep on like this...
many Cameras have the option to shoot in 3:2 - it's just the ratio between the length and the width - So 1600 x 1200 is 4:3 ~ 4x4=16, 3x4 =12 (That's 2mp resolution.) - the other option is to process your own pics and even to print them yourself. You could do your own cropping - or not as you choose.
Good luck & GBY

huntnyc
03-14-2005, 03:37 PM
Thanks for the correction and it is a 1.5 LCD on the A80. Any other suggestions about cameras similar to the A80 or a little better that have the 3x2 option. Thanks for all because it is helping me learn quickly.

Gary

huntnyc
03-14-2005, 08:46 PM
Am I understanidng the specs right when I think the Sony P200 will produce 3x2 JPEGs at the higher resoutions?

Could someone confirm this for me?

Thanks.

Gary

Geoff Chandler
03-15-2005, 10:54 AM
Thanks for the correction and it is a 1.5 LCD on the A80. Any other suggestions about cameras similar to the A80 or a little better that have the 3x2 option. Thanks for all because it is helping me learn quickly.

Gary
Well - take a look at the Olympus C-765 - bigger Zoom, lots of Manual controls and tweeks - excellent Macro - 1.8"screen (I think, not 2")
there are several Olympuses in that Range - check them out in the reviews.
Geoff

huntnyc
03-15-2005, 11:18 AM
Thanks but I do not see a 3x2 ratio that I could use for shots with the Olympus but maybe I am missing something. i just wanted the option to print in this format especially for 4x6 prints.

Thanks for all you help again.

Gary

Ray Schnoor
03-15-2005, 11:22 AM
From Jeff's review,

2288 x 1520 (3:2) in Tiff, SHQ and HQ

Ray.

huntnyc
03-15-2005, 12:15 PM
Yes I see it now. Sorry I was looking at the newer model of this but it seems like the 765 supports more formats and the 3x2 in TIFF and JPEG. Will have to check it along with previous information. If anyone else has any other suggestion for camera, would appreciate it but to Jess and all, this is wonderful information to help me make an informed decision. if anyone does have any comments relating to this topic about the Sony cameras I mentioned or others from Sony with this capability, would love to hear it.

Thanks.

Gary

huntnyc
03-15-2005, 01:12 PM
Looking at the Olympus 765 camera to shoot 4x6 shots, what does no RAW support mean and how would that affect me if at all. Thanks again for all.

Gary

Ray Schnoor
03-15-2005, 01:23 PM
Some cameras can save a photograph in the form of raw data as it comes from the image sensor. This is Raw format. In this format, you can then make changes if necessary to white balance/sharpening/saturation after taking the photo. If it says that there is no Raw support, this only means that the photo is saved as JPEG or maybe TIFF, but I believe that some cameras don't even offer TIFF anymore. I wouldn't worry that the camera doesn't have Raw support. JPEG should be just fine.

Ray.